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OpenEd17: The 14th Annual Open Education Conference
October 11 – 13, 2017  ::  Anaheim, CA

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Tuesday, October 10
 

4:00pm

First Timers Session: Intro to Open Education
This preconference session is for people attending OpenEd for the first time or anyone else who would like a concise introduction (or refresher!) to the core ideas of open education.

Speakers
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Garden Room 1 and 2
 
Wednesday, October 11
 

8:30am

8:30am

Keynote Address: Ryan Merkley
Speakers
avatar for Ryan Merkley

Ryan Merkley

CEO, Creative Commons
Copyright, CC licenses, open government, data, education, and open access. Public domain, policy. Espresso. Bicycles. Why we can't have nice things.


Wednesday October 11, 2017 8:30am - 9:15am
Royal Ballroom

9:15am

Keynote Panel: Cherylee Kushida and Jodi Coffman
In this keynote panel, Cherylee Kushida and Jodi Coffman will facilitate a conversation with California college students about OER, textbooks, paying for college, and a range of other topics.

Speakers
JC

jodi coffman

Professor/Counselor, Santa Ana College
avatar for Cherylee Kushida

Cherylee Kushida

Distance Education Coordinator, Santa Ana College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Royal Ballroom

10:00am

Break
Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Royal Ballroom

10:30am

Scaling Up OERs in Louisiana: A Statewide Plan for Building a Sustainable Library Effort
In Louisiana, OERs have recently become a strategy used by the state legislature to address the rising cost of higher education. This process began with advocacy work led by LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network, the statewide consortium, and directed at the Board of Regents, the governmental body charged with planning, coordinating, and budgeting public higher education in the state. The Regents provided funds to LOUIS that have allowed the consortium to build capacity and infrastructure needed to support the development of OERs in the state.



LOUIS used funds to launch scalable programs and easily adaptable solutions. Using a train-the-trainer model, they quickly built capacity at universities and colleges in the state. Then, they created a structure to provide funds and support for individual academic libraries to begin developing the OER culture locally. Local institutions were able to apply this model to the degree to which they had the capacity and interest to support it. The legislature-to-library-consortium-to-university model has allowed multiple stakeholders take ownership of an element of the project and apply leadership at their level while working towards a shared success in the state.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Frank

Emily Frank

Research & Instruction Librarian, Louisiana State University
avatar for Teri Gallaway

Teri Gallaway

Associate Commissioner, Louisiana Library Network


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Terrace D - F

10:30am

Is a course fee a game changer for sustaining and scaling institutional textbook replacement initiatives?
The Kansas State University Open/Alternative Textbook Initiative has continually grown and evolved since it began in 2012. Initially administrators and the campus community were skeptical of the initiative, but after its demonstrated success and significant return on investment it gained administrative and faculty support. Despite a seemingly conducive environment for it to thrive, the initiative annually struggled to retain/find financial support and by the 2015-2016 academic year had even started to see a decline in applications. This led the initiative to adapt its incentive structure to provide a $10 course fee for courses that use/adapt/adopt and open/alternative resource starting in the 2016-2017 academic year in addition to the up to $5000 awards that have been provided to faculty. $9 of this fee goes back to department teaching the course to provide incentive to support, and continue to use, open/alternative resources. $1 from the fee comes back to the initiative to provide sustained funding that it has lacked throughout its history. Thus far, we are seeing signs that we may be beginning to scale in a way that we never have before as multiple large courses are in the pipeline as well as at least one Dean has been actively asking his departments and faculty to use/adapt/adopt open/alternative resources. At this stage, this would not be possible without support from the Kansas State University Foundation and its donors to provide.

This presentation will describe our experience creating the open/alternative textbook icon used to indicate courses that use an open/alternative resource and collect a fee. In addition, it would briefly describe what a textbook publisher offered to try to retain a large course using their textbooks. I hope to save 10 minutes for questions, discussion, and interaction so that attendees can hopefully find elements of our shared experience that give them hope to receive more gratitude for their efforts at their institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Lindshield

Brian Lindshield

Associate Professor, Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health, Kansas State University
Institutional textbook replacement programs/initiatives. OER and alternative educational resources (AER). Research on perceptions and efficacy of textbook replacement by OER and AER.


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Royal C - F

10:30am

Open Your Eyes to Open Education: 1-Day PD Offerings Introducing K-12 Educators to OER
As the state of Idaho moves toward the adoption of open education resources, one of the biggest challenges is getting the word out about OER to K-12 educators throughout the state. Idaho State Department of Education teamed up with University of Idaho's Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning to create a unique experience for educators with the following goals concerning OER: 1) increase understanding 2) promote use 3) demonstrate how to access 4) share technologies that support use 5) assist with creating collections for use. The outcome was a one-day professional development opportunity offered at three different locations in the state (Moscow, Boise, and Pocatello) to reach out to the majority of Idaho K-12 educators. The day included 12 sessions to create a more individualized experience including a general session to support understanding of OER, sessions on specific OER tools, sessions to support specific subject areas, sessions to introduce technologies that support the use of OER, etc. Teachers could earn one professional development credit with an additional assignment related to implementing OER. This session will share an overview of this pd opportunity and feedback from educators who attended the event. This feedback is being used to guide future OER professional development opportunities including the creation of an online OER professional development course.

Speakers
SC

Scott Cook

Director of Academic Services, Support, & PD, Idaho State Department of Education
avatar for Cassidy Hall

Cassidy Hall

Director, Doceo Center, University of Idaho
I assist university faculty, pre-service teachers at the university, and k12 teachers around the state with integrating technologies in their classrooms. For k12 teachers, this support is in the form of professional development and often pd credit. I also experiment with many t... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Barcelona

10:30am

Moving Beyond OER to OEP: Incorporating Learner-Generated Content into a Non-Traditional Textbook that Responds to the Learning Styles of Today's Students
Tired of using a traditional textbook in my Legal and Ethical Environment of Business course that some students did not purchase and more did not read, I began developing a digital textbook that I have now used in eight sections of the course in the past four semesters. In addition to some original content, the e-book currently has more than 700 links to online readings, videos, websites, and other free open-source web materials that appeal to the learning styles and preferences of today's college students and allows them to personalize their learning. The format and content of the book encourage students to be more self-directed, as it requires them to determine which links to review as they attempt to master the material. To add more interactive content to the book, I have assigned students to create study aids, exercises and assessment tools, as well as Infographics that visually summarize course content. With their permission, I have begun embedding this student work into the book for all users, transforming the initial OER project and moving to a format more aligned with Open Educational Practices. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the e-book and why we selected this format instead of simply adopting an existing OER textbook. While demonstrating the book, I will also show attendees assignments produced by students and embedded in the text, before sharing student feedback on how creating and using these course materials has enhanced their learning experience.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Salloom

Zoe Salloom

Instructional Design, Georgia State University
SW

Susan Willey

Georgia State University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Valencia

10:30am

International Student Engagement with Open Textbooks: A Canadian Perspective
Government funding for post-secondary education has fallen by over 20% in the province of British Columbia since 2001. International student recruitment has filled a pressing funding gap. However, international and domestic students alike are arriving on campus without the funds needed to live and study in Vancouver, one of North America's most expensive cities. Langara College Library has seen a dramatic spike in students seeking course reserves, while others report foregoing readings all together. Fischer, Hilton, Robinson, and Wiley (2015) found that course completion rates, "C-or better" grades, and enrollment intensity were higher among students using no-cost open textbooks versus commercial textbooks. What does adoption of open textbooks mean for international student recruitment, retention, success and engagement? Drawing on data collected through focus groups, the presenters will explore these important questions from the student perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Julian Prior

Julian Prior

Educational Technology Advisor, Langara College
I work as an Educational Technology Advisor with a specialism in multimedia at Langara College in Vancouver. My work involves supporting instructors in the use of video, screencasting and podcasting in teaching and learning. I am an advocate for open educational practices.



Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Terrace A - C

10:30am

Supporting Faculty in Learning, Adopting, and Embracing OERs
Minnesota State, a public system of 7 universities and 30 colleges serving nearly 400,000 students, has partnered with the Open Textbook Network (OTN) since 2014 to deliver training to nearly 300 faculty to OTN and the need, purpose, and possibilities of OER use in the classroom. Many of these faculty have gone on to peer review one or more texts housed in the Open Textbook Library. While there is still need for these basics, there is also growing interest in aiding faculty to move beyond reviewing existing OERs to adopting, redesigning courses, and even authoring their own open texts. To encourage faculty to adopt and embrace OERs in classroom instruction and design, to consider authoring texts, and to think more broadly about engaging in open education practices, the Minnesota State system has begun to coordinate and expand faculty development efforts and supports. In this session, campus faculty and system office presenters will highlight past and current efforts and successes in raising awareness and encouraging adoption, course re-design, and authoring of OERs. We'll share data collected from faculty about interests and needed supports and how this data has informed next steps in effective faculty development. Specifically, we will highlight ongoing and future plans to meet the needs of faculty across the system, including coordination of systemwide communications and scaling up of a successful campus-based initiative for our large, diverse, and complex system. Time will be included for discussion for all of us to learn and share faculty development successes from our many contexts, and participants will leave with ideas and tools for themselves and their faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Johnson

Kimberly Johnson

Director for Faculty and Instructional Development, Minnesota State System Office
avatar for Carrie Lewis Miller

Carrie Lewis Miller

Instructional Designer, Minnesota State University, Mankato
I am an instructional designer with IT Solutions at Minnesota State University, Mankato. I have a Ph.D. in Educational Technology from Arizona State University and have been an instructor in higher education for over 10 years, both in face-to-face and online classes. My research... Read More →
KP

Karen Pikula

Psychology Instructor/OER Coordinator, Central Lakes College



Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Imperial

10:30am

Secondary Students' Perceptions of Open Science Textbooks
In an attempt to align instructional resources with new state standards, and to increase teacher awareness of these standards, one large suburban public school district piloted the development and adoption of open secondary science textbooks. Open textbooks created by teachers in grades six through nine replaced conventional science textbooks provided by mainstream publishing companies. The school district provided students in grades six through eight online access and a print copy of the open textbook. At the end of the first quarter, middle school students (grades six through eight) who used the open textbooks were surveyed. Survey responses required respondents to consider their learning before and during the use of the open textbook. The survey included quality and presentation of content questions, as well as an opportunity for students to explain their responses. There were qualitative and quantitative indications that students' perceptions of an open textbook in place of a standard textbook are improving students' attitudes and behaviors toward learning.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Morales

Rebecca Morales

Secondary Science Instructional Specialist, Broken Arrow Public Schools


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Grenada

10:30am

Equity, bias and their relationship to OER
According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, equity is defined as the freedom from bias or favoritism. Achieving the Dream believes that higher education institutions have an obligation to work toward equity for their students. The development and use of non-biased open resources have the power to create equitable learning experiences for all students. One question this panel will tackle is whether or not the use of OER in higher education environments automatically ensures that issues of diversity and equity are addressed.

The open education movement is heavily rooted in the belief that teachers and faculty have the freedom to develop content that meets the needs of their students. This raises a few questions. Can the implementation of OER exacerbate bias? To what degree is OER content culturally relevant? Does the majority of OER content have a white American male slant? Are we remixing content that unintentionally alienates a particular group of students?

During this session, panelists from community colleges and four year institutions will tackle the tough questions related to the intersection of equity and OER while addressing the ways in which OER can challenge bias.

Session panelists will discuss strategies for creating more diversity in the OER space and exploring success and challenges in developing culturally relevant and relatable OER content. They will also address ways in which colleges can consider issues of equity when designing OER courses and degree programs.

Speakers
avatar for jean amaral

jean amaral

open knowledge librarian, Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY
avatar for Francesca Carpenter

Francesca Carpenter

Associate Director, Achieving the Dream
avatar for Daphnie Sicre

Daphnie Sicre

Assistant Professor, Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY
avatar for Brenda Vollman

Brenda Vollman

Assistant Professor, CUNY BMCC


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 11:25am
Madrid

10:30am

Invisible Allies: Academic Administrator Support for Front-Line Open Education Work
The proposed panel will consist of academic library and higher education administrators from campuses that have successful open education (OE) initiatives. Individuals considered for the panel include academic library managers, associate deans, and deans; directors of centers for teaching and learning; directors of distance education services; and provosts or assistant/vice-provosts. Efforts will be made to include administrators from a variety of campus types (research-intensive universities, smaller/private universities/colleges, and community colleges). Panelists will discuss how they are paving the way for front-line librarians and faculty as they break new ground in OE arenas. Possible discussion topics include the following:

- How do we make decisions about allotting staff time to OE? Who should have ownership of OE responsibilities (librarians, faculty members, instructional designers, others)? Should those responsibilities be shared across a number of individuals or spearheaded by one person?

- How do we open doors across campus for these front-line faculty/staff?

- How can we secure access to student data for librarians and faculty to ensure that they are investing time and resources in the right places on our campus?

- Where can we find funding for OE initiatives, such as grant programs to incentivize faculty to adopt, adapt, and create OER or to design and implement open pedagogy projects in their classrooms?

- How can we adjust faculty promotion and tenure expectations to include work they are doing to adapt/create OER or engage in open pedagogical practices?

Librarian and faculty attendees working on nascent OE initiatives and those whose work is more established will benefit from this panel by learning about novel, concrete ideas with which they can approach administrators to ask for support. Administrator attendees will also benefit from hearing the experiences and advice of their peers on diverse campuses where OE initiatives have been successful.

Speakers
avatar for Jody Bailey

Jody Bailey

Director of Publishing, University of Texas at Arlington
avatar for Gerry Hanley

Gerry Hanley

Assistant Vice-Chancellor, ATS, CSU Office of the Chancellor
Administrator for the California State University system of 23 campuses serving 479,000 students. Executive Director of MERLOT, a free and open educational library and service center for K-12 and higher education. Director of SkillsCommons, a free and open educational library... Read More →
avatar for Jason Pickavance

Jason Pickavance

Director of Faculty Development, Salt Lake Community College
I'm currently Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College. My lead initiative is promoting open educational resources. I'm working on creating individual and structural incentives for the adoption of open content by faculty. I'm also pushing the College to... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 11:25am
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

11:00am

Organizational Innovations to Open Pedagogy
Humboldt State University has developed several strategies to transform courses and promote the adoption of affordable & OERs. Humboldt State University eLearning and Library strategies for California State University Course Transformation and CSU Affordable Learning Solutions are undergoing a design change that coincides with the opening of a new Center for Teaching & Learning. Disparate experiences, skills, and initiatives are coming together to form a holistic strategy in a collaborative faculty development center. Hear what works, what we have learned so far, and how this effort is designed to improve student success. As we open a new Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) these strategies are being integrated and the key participants co-located. How is the CTL related to our Scholars Lab, Digital Media Lab, and HSU Press? How are faculty development efforts being integrated and open pedagogical practices shared and modeled? The panelists each have a unique perspective on the strategies implemented. They will explain the shape and impact of services under rapid evolution to meet the needs to improve student success and curricular innovations. Examples shared include useful approaches to faculty development including; Consultations between faculty, librarians, and instructional designers, Faculty led luncheons, Open Access publishing, Workshops for individual faculty and whole departments both in-person and online, and HSU's Unconference. Also discussed is the integration of strategies to address the challenge of instructional material accessibility.

Speakers
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Terrace D - F

11:00am

OEP Loading...: Considering Open Pedagogy in Practice
What does open pedagogy look like in practice? Using open pedagogy to frame the discussion, presenters will share how they have designed their courses, Introduction to Sociology and Introduction to Literature, to create meaningful, engaging open learning opportunities for their students. The presenters will share reflections and insights gained from their teaching experiences as well as examples of open practices enabled by Open Educational Resources.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Valencia

11:00am

Student Views of The Use of Open Textbooks at One Canadian University
This session will present results from a survey administered to students at a medical / doctoral university who were enrolled in four courses using open textbooks instead of commercial texts. An existing open textbook survey (Jhangiani, Dastur, Le Grand, & Penner, under review) was adapted and distributed electronically to all students in these courses. Students were asked to share their views on the specific textbook compared to "traditional" textbooks they had used in other courses, in what format they preferred to access the texts, how they had dealt with the cost of commercial resources required for other courses, and other factors that could inform the open educational resources initiative at the university.

Results from all four courses will be explored, with an emphasis on a first year sociology courses, which had a particularly high rate of response (n=129/343). In addition, data about course averages and completion rates were obtained for this offering and the two previous when a commercial text was used, to allow for a comparison.

References

Jhangiani, R. S., Dastur, F., N., Le Grand, R., & Penner, K. (under review). As good or better than commercial textbooks: Students' perceptions and outcomes from using open digital and open print textbooks.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Terrace A - C

11:00am

Collaborating with Students on OER Advocacy
For many student leaders, finding ways to make a post-secondary degree more affordable is a top priority. While student leaders may have heard about the benefits of OER, many may not be aware of the tactics needed to actually transition their efforts into increased awareness and adoption. Further many librarians, teaching and learning support staff and faculty members working to advance OER on campus have not yet collaborated with students. In recognition of this, this workshop will provide attendees with an overview of grassroots tactics, highlighting the benefits of involving students in OER advocacy. Through highlighting successful collaborative OER campaigns, this session will provide attendees with the opportunity to connect, learn from one another and commit to further action that can be taken on their campuses through grassroots organizing.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. I've devoted my career to advocating for open education to benefit students — starting back when I was an undergraduate student myself frustrated with expensive textbooks in the information-rich world we live in. My ex... Read More →
avatar for Katie Steen

Katie Steen

Open Education Fellow, SPARC
avatar for Kaitlyn Vitez

Kaitlyn Vitez

Higher Education Advocate, U.S. PIRG
avatar for Brady Yano

Brady Yano

Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC
Come chat with me about Connect OER, OpenCon, the OER Digest, libraries and student engagement!


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Grenada

11:00am

How the Sausage Gets Made: Building State-Wide Support for Open Education Initiatives
Over the last few years, we've seen increasing state-wide support for open education. But how does that support begin? Who's behind those initiatives and what are they doing to advance open education efforts at the state level? This panel presentation will share the experiences of initiators of state-wide programs across four states (Ohio, Virginia, Louisiana, and Wisconsin). While each panelist has gained state-wide support for open textbook adoption, they have done so in different ways and with different degrees of mandate. The panelists will have the opportunity to share their processes, their lessons learned, their successes, and the status of their efforts, helping attendees identify avenues for their own state-wide initiatives while also demonstrating there is not just one way to establish or implement support. One thing these panelists will certainly agree on though --it's worth the effort.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Butterfield

Robert Butterfield

Director, Instructional Resources, University of Wisconsin-Stout
I am the Director of Instructional Resources for the University of Wisconsin-Stout. Instructional Resources provides print textbook rentals, e-texts, access codes and other resources in support of our curriculum supported by student fees. We also operate the campus OER program... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Teri Gallaway

Teri Gallaway

Associate Commissioner, Louisiana Library Network
GT

Glenda Thornton

Director, Michael Schwartz Library
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Open Ed, Copyright & Scholarly Comm Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright, and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech. She works with faculty, administrators, and staff on local, state, national and international levels to inspire faculty to choose, adapt, and create learning resources which are m... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:55am
Royal C - F

11:00am

Reviewing K-12 OER Materials
Abstract: Emerging research shows the impact of quality instructional materials on student achievement to be as large as quality instruction, and almost 40 times more cost-effective than class size reduction. As Open Education Resources seek to bolster their credibility in the materials space, it is imperative that OERs meet expectations when it comes to alignment with CCSS, usability, and other quality criteria. EdReports.org is an independent nonprofit that publishes free reviews of instructional materials, using an educator-designed tool that measures these criteria. The reports help districts and educators make informed purchasing and instructional decisions that support improved student outcomes. EdReports.org has reviewed or is in the process of reviewing 6 OER series finding a mix of quality with some grade-level materials meeting expectations and others only partially meeting expectations. At this session, we'll discuss the landscape of education materials with our panel and walk through how collaboration can lead to excellent materials for all students.

Speakers
avatar for Liisa Moilanen Potts

Liisa Moilanen Potts

Director of ELA, EdReports.org
I've been working to support all students in literacy for 25 years as a teacher (in Iowa and California) and as a leadership and instructional coach in CA and Washington state. I served as Washington's Director of Literacy and Professional Learning before coming to EdReports, whe... Read More →



Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:55am
Barcelona

11:30am

Using Collaborative Learning Circles to Promote OER Review, Adoption, Course Redesign, and Authoring
This presenter will share the process that Central Lakes College has used to overcome many of the barriers associated with OER adoption, course redesign, and the authoring of new OER materials through faculty participation in OER Learning Circles and faculty access to a D2L Brightspace support course room. The presenter will outline the process she used to create and facilitate collaborative interdisciplinary faculty Learning Circles. She will provide suggestions for creating a D2L Brightspace support course room structured with weekly journal activities, weekly work plan update activities, optional weekly discussion activities, a repository of OER websites, websites and materials dedicated to ADA compliance, and support links and templates for writing and aligning assessments with learning objectives. She will share examples of the simple templates that she has created to guide faculty through the review, course redesign, and authoring pathways.

Speakers
KP

Karen Pikula

Psychology Instructor/OER Coordinator, Central Lakes College



Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Terrace D - F

11:30am

Giving All Students a Voice: Word Generation in Our Nation's Toughest Schools
This presentation will briefly introduce the Word Generation program, describe its design features, and share teachers' and students' experiences, with a focus on those that give us hope by better preparing our nation's students as informed citizenry.

At a time in which rhetoric that challenges the norms for civility in public discourse has become commonplace, students in middle schools across the country ”from New York City to Salt Lake City to rural North Carolina ”are reaching for a higher standard. The Word Generation program developed by the Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) offers freely available materials and web-based supports to bring evidence-based debate about important civic issues into the classroom, while at the same time promoting mastery of academic language.

Each Word Generation unit focuses on a challenging issue (e.g., What makes an American? Is the death penalty justified?) and culminates in a debate in which students use textual evidence to argue for their position. Design features such as discussion prompts and argument outlines guide students to develop and support positions and respond to each other's reasoning.

Engaging middle school students in civic debate is not an easy sell to time-strapped teachers. But the program is designed to develop academic vocabulary ”a high priority in middle grades. And teachers who initially doubt their students' capacity to discuss complex social issues at all ”let alone from multiple perspectives ”frequently express surprise at the depth of their students' thinking.

By using academic language as a vehicle, embedding supports for teachers and students, and offering the curriculum as an OER, students from disadvantaged backgrounds at the toughest schools are being given the opportunity to share and strengthen their voice, to respect and build on others' ideas, and to become expert in gathering and presenting evidence ”skills needed for the sustainability of a strong democracy.

Speakers
AH

Allie Huyghe

SERP Institute


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Madrid

11:30am

Beyond the Z-Degree: A New Model for OER in Higher Education
Thomas Edison State University, a pioneer in adult education, and Saylor Academy, a leader in the Open Education movement, have collaborated on the development of a brand new Associates of Arts in Liberal Studies degree program, which will be both competency based and openly licensed.

Using a framework developed by Thomas Edison, made up of 57 unique competencies, spread over 3 broad knowledge groups, and 16 competency domains, Saylor has been creating open learning modules aligned to each competency. The result of this effort, once paired with learning assessments designed and administered by TESU, will be a first of its kind, openly licensed CBE degree program.

Everything from the competency framework itself, the 57 individual learning modules, assessment rubrics, and the learning resources curated within the modules (to date, approximately 2,800 pieces of OER have been vetted by SMEs for inclusion), will be openly licensed, so that even students not pursuing this degree directly with TESU will be able to benefit from its creation. Likewise, other institutions looking to expand OER adoption, or pursue the offering of a CBE degree themselves, will have the opportunity to use what has been created, in part or in whole, to drastically speed up the time of development and innovation. Further, by providing the competency curriculum openly, TESU hopes to provide a foundation for discussions around unified CBE standards that will not only advance the field pedagogically, but also from a technological and regulatory standpoint.



During the presentation, TESU and Saylor will discuss the design of this unique program, as well as the motivations for investing in the creation of a degree program that not only uses OER to help reduce costs for students, but is itself an OER. The discussion will also focus on the important benefits that a CBE program can have for adult learners, and the ways that OER further help to meet the needs of adult and nontraditional learners.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Phillips

Steve Phillips

Associate Director, Thomas Edison State University
Steve Phillips serves as an Associate Director for Thomas Edison State University's Center for the Assessment of Learning (CAL). His primary responsibility is to develop programs that position the college as a leader in measuring learning outside of the classroom, or “untethere... Read More →
avatar for Devon Ritter

Devon Ritter

Director of Education, Saylor Academy


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

11:30am

Teaching Naked Behind Bars: Exploring the Empowerment of Needs-Based, Technologically Fluid, Open-Education Course Development in Prisons
Course development, teaching, and dissemination of academic materials is nothing if not unpredictable when it is executed in a College Prison Program. Around the country, each prison has different rules and every warden and state offer varying levels of support towards the idea of educating individuals who have been convicted of a felony. Lockdowns, funding controversies, access to textbooks outside of class, limited to no access to technology and micro-managing of time can all influence the type of education and assessment that is possible in the development of a college level course in a prison setting. This presentation explores the pedagogical process of building a college course in Sociology that is not only accessible to Prison Inmates but highly-relevant to their specific experiences and, works within the extremely regimented needs of the Prison. Based on the values of accessible education, a pedagogy of inclusivity and a theory of intersectionality, this author will explore ways in which we can compile an archive of sociological and educational materials pertinent to the realities of incarceration. By providing students materials that are relevant to their world and their needs we can create an educational experience that truly empowers students to cultivate their minds; even within a system when all other power in their lives has been muted.

Speakers
ZM

Zendina Mostert Mostert

Assistant Professor, Sociology, Salt Lake Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Valencia

11:30am

Launching an OER Degree: Interim Findings from ATD's OER Degree Initiative
Unlike individual OER courses, which can be developed independently by faculty, developing an OER degree program requires sustained institutional involvement and investment in course development and infrastructure. Launching an OER Degree program requires a coordinated planning process between academic departments and college administrative units, the modification of institutional systems to identify OER course sections and implement course fees, and the enlistment of non-instructional support and advising staff.

Achieving the Dream, a national, nonprofit organization that champions and supports evidence-based institutional improvement, launched the OER Degree Initiative to investigate, among other things, how community colleges successfully roll-out and sustain OER degree programs. Through this ambitious initiative, 38 community colleges across the country are creating and piloting fully OER-based degree programs and ATD research partners SRI International and rpkGROUP are evaluating the student outcomes, project costs, and effective implementation strategies of these new OER degree programs.

During this session you will learn about the early findings of the OER Degree Initiative evaluation, with a particular focus on what we have learned about effective OER degree implementation.

Speakers
RG

Rebecca Griffiths

Principal Education Researcher, SRI
Education researcher focused on evaluating technology-supported interventions aimed at improving student learning and success in K-12 and postsecondary settings. Enjoy investigating system-level and organizational facilitators and barriers to innovation. Lead large-scale researc... Read More →
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Iitiative, Achieving the Dream, Inc.
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources.Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technol... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Terrace A - C

11:30am

Building sustainable OER businesses in K-12
Open Up Resources has partnered with Illustrative Mathematics to develop an open middle school math curriculum and are working with school districts in the US with the goal of widespread adoption.

This session will focus on how each organization has developed a business model that features materials licensed using CC BY. We'll discuss the issues and opportunities inherent in selling related products, like print editions and materials kits, and services, like teacher professional development.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Grenada

11:30am

Opening Up in Brooklyn: The KCC OER Initiative and OERs in Higher Ed
Adopting OERs widely would help reduce the cost of attendance, while improving the quality of the educational experience students have by bringing better materials and digital literacy skill-building into every OER course. But getting faculty interested in adopting OERs can be challenging. Some fear the unknown, some are afraid of extra work, some are general technophobes, and some just need guidance to begin their own OER journey. This presentation will cover the work of the KCC OER Initiative, which began as an idea and runs on a shoestring budget, at Kingsborough Community College, an urban community college in the City University of New York. To increase adoption of OERs on campus, while maintaining the utmost respect for academic freedom and compassion for our more technologically challenged colleagues, we have focused on making the financial case to faculty and pointing out that as faculty, we all do the work of course design already. The presentation will also cover the different ways the Initiative tries to provide support to interested faculty to make it as easy as possible to open up to OERs using the SAMR approach, including OER Office Hours, Lib Guides, and grant and workshop opportunities. Finally, we are working on building a community and culture of open education. In tracing the OER Initiative at Kingsborough, this presentation will provide how-to resources for a variety of academic disciplines using the SAMR model, with examples of how OERs can be implemented with minimal initial efforts to improve teaching and learning and student engagement, while saving money.

Speakers
SB

Shawna Brandle

Shawna M. Brandle (@ProfBrandle) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Kingsborough Community College in CUNY. Her PhD is in international relations and comparative politics. She is the author of Television News Coverage of Human Rights: The Violations Will Not Be T... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Imperial

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday October 11, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Royal Ballroom

1:00pm

Collaboration is a Prelude to Open Education
In 2015 the Alberta Government provided funding for Open Educational Resource projects within the province in reaction to a growing global movement towards open and free educational materials to displace the publishing industry stranglehold on education. Our proposal was awarded funds in large part due to the fundamental collaborative component of the project which reached well beyond the borders of the University. In the world that is heading to more borders, more segregation, and more siloing, our project undertook to build relationships and break down the barriers that prevent large scale collaborative activities in the humanities.

During 18 months, our Spanish OER project engaged six universities, over 100 professors, graduate students, undergraduates, and members of the community to create, edit, and digitize a textbook for the 1st semester of Spanish at the post-secondary level.

The presentation will describe the logic behind the project, the scope of collaboration, and how it opened up the role of content expert, editor, professor, tutor, and student. We will discuss the rationale and successes of technological innovation and integration in the textbook and during the joint effort of creating resources. We examine these processes through the lens of collaborative creation, collaborative teaching, and collaborative learning, which are the essential elements of this project.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Dabrowski

Michael Dabrowski

Academic Coordinator, Spanish, Athabasca University
Michael Dabrowski is a Spanish Coordinator at Athabasca University. Michael's research interests include collaborative peer teaching, technology assisted language learning, cultural studies, border studies, peninsular golden age theatre, and contemporary Hispanic short story, theatre and film. Michael recently worked on a collaborative OER project funded by... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Terrace D - F

1:00pm

Serving Students: Updates on MCOpen and Montgomery College OER Degrees
Montgomery College's commitment to developing OER (z-degree) options is a desire to increase access, affordability, and success for Montgomery County's diverse population, particularly students who are marginalized or underrepresented. Montgomery College's mission and vision emphasize empowering students to change their lives and being an model of educational excellence, opportunity and success. Through a collegewide initiative MC Open, Montgomery College is providing students with the ability to save money on instructional materials while at the same time decreasing the time to degree completion. The first full semester of promoting z-courses through MC Open resulted in more than 3,400 enrollments in about 200 course sections. In concert with MC Open, Montgomery College is developing General Studies A. A. degree options with funding from Achieving the Dream. The initial General Studies OER degree options focus on two transfer paths with in the program, Psychology and English although students are not limited to those transfer options. The General Studies degree typically serves 9,000 students each semester, but courses within the z-degree impact over 25,000 students each semester because the majority of the selected courses meet General Education requirements for any student.The College hopes that the General Studies OER Degree project will help more students complete degrees by increasing access to affordable, quality material; by using open materials and instructional strategies which target a diverse range of learning styles and interests; by decreasing overall student costs, and by providing model paths for students to complete a General Studies A.A. degree.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Mills

Michael Mills

Vice President, Montgomery College
avatar for Samantha Veneruso

Samantha Veneruso

Montgomery College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Madrid

1:00pm

OER in First-Year Composition: Sharing, Implementation and Collaboration
In an effort to fulfill Pima Community College's OER course development goals for Achieving the Dream, the presenters and members of their Center for Learning Technology team recently created two first-year writing courses utilizing only OER content. This presentation will provide a practical guide for instructors seeking to transition to an OER-only or OER-supplemented first-year composition course within a four-month timeline. The presentation will cover sharing and brainstorming strategies, aligning outcomes, designing assignments, identifying relevant OER resources, evaluating OER content, and modifying OER content to support course learning outcomes. The presenters will also discuss benefits and best practices related to teaching first-year composition with OER content, as well as ways to work with instructional designers and share OER content with other faculty and throughout the college. This presentation relates directly to the follow conference themes: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in Higher Education, Open Pedagogy and Open Educational Practices, and The Role of Faculty in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Aldrich

Eric Aldrich

English Faculty, Pima Community College
Eric Aldrich teaches Writing and Literature at Pima Community College in Tucson, AZ.
JM

Josie Milliken

English Faculty, Pima Community College



Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

1:00pm

Sustaining an OER Degree: The Z Degree Turns 3
In 2013 Tidewater Community College created the first Associate of Science Z Degree when they replaced 100% of publisher content in 21 courses with Open Educational Resources. TCC's Chief Academic Officer, Daniel DeMarte and Faculty Lead, Linda Williams will share lessons learned and best practices from the Z Degree. Since 2013, TCC has operationalized the original Z Degree and expanded OER adoption to create 3 additional Z Degrees. Sustaining these efforts over time has been challenging, but through a combination of administrative support and faculty engagement over 5,000 students each semester now enroll in a z course. It is never too early or too late to plan for long term sustainability of OER initiatives. In this session topics will include institutional commitment, faculty engagement, resource allocation, data collection and student success.

Speakers
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda Williams

Linda Williams

Professor, Business Administration, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for te... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Royal C - F

1:00pm

The Enacted Curriculum: How States and Districts are Empowering PreK-12 Teachers to Use OER
In October of 2015, state and district leaders from around the country gathered at the White House to announce their intention to "Go Open." The districts in attendance pledged to replace at least one set of course materials with open educational resources, while state leaders committed to supporting district work and work to establish infrastructure for sharing OER.

Just two years later, this work has grown into a diverse movement of state and district education leaders across the country who are exploring OER as a potential solution to shortcomings in the marketplace for PreK-12 curricular materials. These leaders are identifying teachers who are already using OER in the classroom, integrating OER into existing processes for curriculum selection, and leveraging OER to fill existing gaps in resources.

Lindsey Tepe, senior policy analyst at New America, will provide an overview of state and district work, covered in a forthcoming policy paper to be released in summer 2017. Kristina Peters, K-12 Open Education Fellow with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Technology, will highlight implementation of PreK-12 OER at the district level. Erika Aparaka, OER Fellow with the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), will provide insight into future directions for state work and the potential for state collaboration around OER.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Aparaka

Erika Aparaka

Graduate Student, University of Maryland College Park
avatar for Kristina Ishmael-Peters

Kristina Ishmael-Peters

Public Interest Tech & Education Policy Fellow, New America
Kristina Peters is a fellow for Public Interest Technology at New America. She is collaborating with the Education Policy program to support states and districts using Open Educational Resources (OER) to transform teaching and learning. | | Before joining New America, Peters... Read More →
avatar for Lindsey Tepe

Lindsey Tepe

Senior Policy Analyst, New America
Lindsey Tepe is a policy analyst with New America’s Education Policy Program. Her work focuses primarily on innovation and new technologies in public schools. She researches and writes on a variety of topics, including open education resources, school broadband connectivity, pe... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Barcelona

1:00pm

Fake It Til You Make It: OER and Media Literacy in the Classroom
Today's fake news crisis and its connection to media literacy offers an opportunity to explore the concept of open pedagogy. In November 2016, at the height of the election season and in the midst of a national conversation on validity in media, the Stanford History Education Group released a report describing the capacity of students to appropriately interpret digital media. The results indicated an astounding lack of proficiency among students at all levels - far beyond what researchers anticipated. Overall, students in K-12 and higher education may be graduating without the capacity to properly evaluate digital sources of information.

With the rapid growth of digital media as an integral component of communication, students need explicit instruction in media literacy skills. However, institutions of higher education have not determined the means to provide this instruction, and the subject remains unattached to any specific discipline. At the same time, public faith in universities and colleges has dwindled, resulting in calls for educational reform. Students' difficulty in effectively navigating society's digital landscape may add to public concern that higher education isn't doing its job well.

In order to reinstill public faith, academia must embrace a focus on student learning and evidence-based pedagogical practice. An open approach to pedagogy may help the academy answer the public's call for reform. Openness has sustained innovations in the past such as the proliferation of innovations including scientific journals in the 16th century and the world wide web more recently.

Schmidt (2015) has recommended an interdisciplinary approach to media literacy instruction through the integration of brief media literacy tutorials embedded within the content lessons of various courses. In this brief session, three professors will discuss their pedagogical experiences integrating media literacy and OER into instruction.

Speakers
MG

Megan Gooding

Associate Professor of History, Odessa College
avatar for Mystic Jordan

Mystic Jordan

Chair of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Odessa College
DR

Daniel Regalado

History/Govt Faculty, Odessa College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Valencia

1:00pm

A Model Pilot OER Efficacy Study for Community Colleges
This study analyzed the effect enrollment in an OER course had on student academic achievement when controlling for prior academic achievement in an introductory online history course at a large community college. A correlation analysis and simple linear regression were conducted. The results of this research indicate a significant positive moderate correlation between OER and student achievement. The study also provides a springboard for discussion about the value of rigorous research at community colleges using readily available data through student information systems. This session may be interesting for community college leaders who want to begin to use data more effectively or who seek to take on more of researcher/practitioner role at their institutions. This session can motivate community college leaders to conduct research of their own using data available from their own institutions to make decisions about OER use, adoption, and policy.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Grewe

Kim Grewe

Chancellor's Faculty Fellow, Virginia Community College System
I am an educator, scholar, technology enthusiast, and champion of Open Education with over 25 years' teaching experience from middle school to community college. I am currently working on a PhD in Community College Leadership at Old Dominion University where I am conducting res... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Terrace A - C

1:00pm

The Open Textbook Network Vision
The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is an alliance of more than 380 colleges and universities committed to improving education through the use of open textbooks. The OTN was built on some basic faculty education and engagement strategies that were found to be effective in convincing faculty to adopt open textbooks. While the successful growth of the OTN has been primarily based on this effective faculty development, these tactics are grounded in a larger vision for open education in higher education.

Central to this model is the belief that open education is critical to the mission of colleges and universities - so critical that it merits the ongoing investment of institutional resources in the effort. These resources are used to embed the necessary work required for a sustainable open education ecosystem (e.g., adoption, editing, creation, pedagogy) within and across higher education institutions. The OTN's efforts are focused on motivating faculty, staff, and institutional leaders to enact this permanent change.

Many in the field of open education are only looking to for-profit ventures in their quest for the "business model" for open education (presumably because for-profit companies are primary players in course content today). In contrast, the OTN is working toward a vision where colleges and universities are primarily and collectively responsible for course content. As open education leader Hal Plotkin once said, "We have a business model for open education. It's called 'schools.'"

The presentation will describe this vision, the strategies that the OTN is using to move toward that vision, and measures of progress to date.

Speakers
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improv... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Grenada

1:30pm

Content Camp: Ohio State's Collaborative, Open Test Bank Pilot
In recent student focus groups, Ohio State's Affordable Learning Exchange team discovered that required textbooks were assigned not because the texts were referenced heavily in class, but primarily for access to test banks used to deliver quizzes throughout the semester. These test banks are a significant barrier to open textbook adoption in large enrollment courses at our institution, and the questions included are often of low quality. To address this barrier, we're piloting a process to bring faculty from across several institutions to collaboratively author and review large test banks in three disciplines: Macroeconomics, Biology and Sociology. In this pilot, we are examining the time, tools and resources required to create not only a test bank useful in one course with a specific textbook, but one that can be used and customized by many instructors in an iterative, sustainable process in many courses across institutions. The project began in March 17 and will produce test banks ready for use beginning in fall 17. Questions we will attempt to answer in this session include: How do authors approach development of learning objectives that can be applied across many courses, using differing course materials? How do we integrate a robust peer review process into this process, to create a higher-quality finished product? What process and support framework should be in place for each content area? How many contributors are needed to create a robust test bank, and how do needs change based on discipline? Which part of the workflow can be managed within an authoring tool? What is the best way to deliver question/answer sets for easy remix and reuse? We will share Content Camp project and process documentation and resources and report on our lessons learned and future plans. The audience will be actively engaged in the conversation, with plenty of time for questions and feedback that we'll take back home and incorporate as our Content Camp model grows beyond the pilot.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Miller

Ashley Miller

Program Manager, Affordability and Access, Ohio State University
Affordable Learning Exchange / The Ohio State University / Saving students $10M by 2020


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Grenada

1:30pm

A New Tool to Personalize Learning with OER: The Middletown Learning Path
The Middletown Learning Path is an innovative new OER tool for educators and students which solves for inefficiencies in the curriculum marketplace and fosters personalized learning. The OER player provides access to high-quality, standards aligned, vetted digital resources and assessments for educators and students. The player feeds data to educators, allowing them to create personalized playlists for students, enabling increased student agency and choice.

We are proposing an interactive discussion session in which we will provide a short presentation on OER and the Middletown Learning Path tool. The presenters will each have a few minutes to discuss their involvement in the development and use of the tool. We will conduct a poll to better understand the audience and use Google slides to facilitate a discussion around the implementation, vetting and development of OER to fill curriculum gaps and personalize learning for students.

The Middletown Learning Path is being developed in a partnership between the Enlarged School District of Middletown, New York and Education Elements. The Learning Accelerator is spotlighting examples of how OER can be used in blended and personalized classrooms to increase student agency and engagement. The panel members will include Ken Eastwood, Superintendent of Middletown School District, Ray Rozycki, Vice President of Education at Education Elements and Jennifer Wolfe, Partner at The Learning Accelerator.

Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Eastwood

Kenneth Eastwood

superintendent, Middletown City Schools, NY
avatar for Jennifer Wolfe

Jennifer Wolfe

Partner, The Learning Accelerator


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Barcelona

1:30pm

Utah Higher Ed: State-Wide Higher Ed Survey, the Impact of Texts on Students, and Faculty Willingness Toward Adoption
In 2015 - 2016, we surveyed students and teachers in post-secondary institutions across Utah to gauge their perceptions of textbook cost, selection, and OER. Responses were gathered from the majority of institutions in the state. This study was guided by the following research questions:

1. How do students perceive textbook costs influence their academic success?

2. What would students do with the money they saved if they didn't buy textbooks?

3. What are students' general feelings about textbook costs?

4. How do student responses on the above questions vary between two and four year institutions?

5. How do faculty members select their textbooks?

6. What percentage of faculty were willing to consider using and would like help finding open textbooks?

7. Are there any correlations between faculty perceived cost of textbooks (or the lack of knowledge about the cost) and their willingness to use OER?

8. Why do faculty members say they would or would not be willing to use an open textbook?

9. How do faculty responses on the above vary by institution?

In this presentation, we will present the findings of this survey. Notable findings on the student survey include that 2/3 of the students who participated in the study had to forego purchasing a textbook due to the high cost and more than 85% of students had to delay purchasing an expensive textbook which they felt negatively impacted academic performance. Students felt cost was burdensome, felt extremely negatively towards textbook costs, and would use potential savings from OER adoption back into their education and day-to-day expenses.

Faculty results include that adjunct professors are less often in a position to select their own textbooks, despite being willing to consider OER. Although there are no correlations between knowing the list price of text and being willing to adopt OER, over 90% of faculty were willing to consider adopting OER and their reasons for their willingness will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Olga Belikov

Olga Belikov

Student, Brigham Young University
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, BYU
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Open Education Group at Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
TM

Troy Martin

Enterprise Architect, Brigham Young University
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Terrace A - C

1:30pm

10 Tips for Getting Faculty to Open Up: Number 6 will shock you!
Openly sharing learning resources to create pathways for hope and opportunity is growing ever more important as ideological and physical borders become increasingly less porous. With materials from over 2,000 courses and 200 million visitors, unlocking knowledge and empowering minds is at the heart of what we do at MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW). In addition to sharing OER through OCW, many MIT faculty members also share their teaching experiences, ideas, and approaches in a special section of their OCW courses, called Instructor Insights. In this section, instructors discuss topics of interest to practicing teachers, such as course design, active learning, engaging learners, teaching with technology, and creating learning communities ”the types of things that help teachers use the resources more effectively with students, thus multiplying their impact.

MIT Instructors share their insights through the OCW Educator project, a faculty-inspired initiative designed to pull back the curtain on MIT teaching for their colleagues at the Institute and around the world. It's based on the idea that sharing the how behind the what of OER makes the materials more useful for educators, and thus, for learners. OCW Educator has been up and running for 3 years, and in that time, we've worked with MIT educators to share more than 130 sets of instructor insights. As the OCW Educator project manager, I've learned a lot about what works for encouraging faculty to openly share their teaching approaches along with their OER. In this presentation, I provide a brief tour of OCW Educator, including how it got started and what the site looks like today, and share 10 tips for getting faculty members to share their instructional approaches. The presentation, which aims to inspire and provide a framework for other institutions to do similar work, will conclude with an interactive conversation about how we can more systematically collect and share faculty insights to support OER use.

Speakers
SH

Sarah Hansen

OCW Educator Project Manager, MIT OpenCourseWare


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Imperial

1:30pm

Open Collaboration & Open Textbooks: Making It Work
The Rebus Community is an effort to build a collaborative model for open textbook publishing. As of January, 2017 we are working on a dozen Open Textbook projects, with faculty and staff from more than 30 institutions. We'll talk about where we're at, what we've learned, where we're going and how to get involved.

At the Rebus Community, we are building a community-driven, open textbook publishing process, and a global community of collaborators on Open Textbook creation, supported, where appropriate, with technology.

The Rebus Community was founded in August 2016 to address the following problems:

1. there is no standardized, cost-effective way to publish Open Textbooks

2. institutions or academics wishing to publish Open Textbooks must figure out how to do it themselves

3. there is no central community of Open Textbook creators, to enable sharing of knowhow and processes

4. there is no standard (web-based or otherwise) format for Open Textbooks to enable the kind of remixing open licenses are meant to afford.

Seven months in, we are working with 31 faculty, 17 librarians, 22 other collaborators from 51 institutions working on 12 open textbook projects. This work is feeding into development and enhancement of software to address pain points in Open Textbooks publishing.

We'll talk about what we've learned so far as we've begun to build a collaborative ecosystem around the process of creating open textbooks, what's next and how to get involved in the Rebus Community.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Terrace D - F

1:30pm

Aiming for Equity: Ensuring OER doesn’t exacerbate existing achievement gaps

Overview: In the US, there is desperate need to address inequity in our education system. High poverty-schools account for 25% of all public schools, and in every state, those students complete high school at a significantly lower rate than their peers. This trend continues straight into higher education, where economically disadvantaged students finish their degree programs at significantly lower rates than their peers.

OER has tremendous potential to bring equity to our schools and ensure that all students – regardless of their economic status, location, and background – have access to the same high quality learning materials. But as we push for greater OER adoption, are there ways that OER can exacerbate or entrench existing inequity?

This panel features two higher education experts and two K-12 experts, who will discuss this question and brainstorm how to best position OER as a solution to inequity in education moving forward.

 


Speakers
avatar for Erika Aparaka

Erika Aparaka

Graduate Student, University of Maryland College Park
avatar for Francesca Carpenter

Francesca Carpenter

Associate Director, Achieving the Dream
avatar for Manuela Ekowo

Manuela Ekowo

Policy Analyst, New America
Manuela Ekowo is a policy analyst with the Education Policy program at New America. She provides research and analysis on policies related to higher education including innovations in higher education delivery, the use of technology, open educational resources (OER), and ensuring... Read More →
TM

Teresa Mooney

Program Associate, Council of Chief State School Officers
avatar for Ethan Senack

Ethan Senack

Policy and Communications Manager, Creative Commons USA


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Madrid

1:30pm

Theoretical Frameworks: Higher Ed, OER, and Writing
At Salt Lake Community College we have a robust OER initiative which cuts across several disciplines and modalities of instruction. The English department has taken up the OER initiative and developed a flexible OER composition program grounded in theoretical frameworks within English studies and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. The open curricular design of the program actively promotes freedom and creativity in the delivery of our composition courses, while also building programmatic cohesiveness through a shared commitment to common student goals and outcomes.

Because of our institution's open access mission, diversity is both our greatest asset for teaching and learning and one of our primary challenges as teachers tasked with writing instruction. Threshold theory has been a generative framework for us to design and implement a composition program that uses OERs and open pedagogy to respond to local needs and values. Threshold concepts--particular concepts within a discipline that are viewed as central to understanding the subject (Meyer and Land)--have been our vehicle to draw attention to what matters most in the curriculum, thereby providing our faculty with a conceptual foundation from which to build our OERs through both curation and authorship. Threshold concepts have also encouraged us to practice open pedagogies that engage students in recursive, problem-based, and transformational learning.

In this panel, SLCC academic staff and English department faculty discuss the theoretical frameworks that guide their work and intersect with OER, including threshold concepts, open online instruction, studio models, writing center theory and theories of team teaching. We argue that successful OER initiatives must consider how the theoretical frameworks that already circulate within one's local context work with and against the larger goals of open pedagogy, especially in open access institutions such as SLCC.

Speakers
RC

Ron Christiansen

Associate Professor, Salt Lake Community College
JJ

Justin Jory

Associate Professor, Salt Lake Community College
avatar for Jason Pickavance

Jason Pickavance

Director of Faculty Development, Salt Lake Community College
I'm currently Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College. My lead initiative is promoting open educational resources. I'm working on creating individual and structural incentives for the adoption of open content by faculty. I'm also pushing the College to... Read More →
MS

Marlena Stanford

Assistant Professor, Salt Lake Community College
BS

Brittany Stephenson

Associate Professor, Salt Lake Community College



Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

1:30pm

Complementary and Necessarily Bundled: Leveraging Partnerships to Bring Open Pedagogy to Scale
Open pedagogy is the future of open education because of the potential for an educational community to engage in the creation of the next generation of content while improving student learning. However, building open pedagogy to scale at most institutions has proven difficult, partially because of customized learning experiences and partially because of lack of faculty knowledge about how to support open pedagogy assignments. One way to increase adoption of open pedagogy is to leverage the existing infrastructure and institutional awareness around information literacy. The similarities in goals between open pedagogy and information literacy work represents a natural partnership that open practitioners can draw upon to support the increased adoption of both information-rich and renewable assignments in the curriculum. Panelists in this session will discuss a librarian's perspective on building programmatic support for open pedagogical practice, similar to how libraries have built programmatic support for information literacy. With a focus on scholarship of teaching and learning and open educational practices, we'll demonstrate how the work of open education practitioners and librarians is both complementary and necessarily bundled. When our professional, ethical, and teaching practices are united, open pedagogy can be better organized to scale.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Amy Hofer

Amy Hofer

Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library, Open Oregon Educational Resources
avatar for Michelle Reed

Michelle Reed

Open Education Librarian, University of Texas at Arlington
I lead efforts to support the adoption, adaptation, and creation of OER and advocate for the creation of experiential learning opportunities that foster collaboration, increase engagement, and empower students as content creators. Additionally, I’m a 2017-18 OER Research Fello... Read More →
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Valencia

1:30pm

Advancing OER friendly policy in state legislatures

State government leaders can accelerate the adoption of OER in higher ed and k-12, but first they have to know about OER and understand its advantages. This panel will address the best ways you can inform legislators about OER and encourage OER friendly policies in your state. It will feature Hon. Donna Howard, currently serving her seventh term in the Texas House of Representatives, who led the passage of major OER legislation this spring.  Joining her will be Nicole Allen, an experienced grassroots organizer, and Daniel Williamson, an OER Producer. Together, we will discuss the best practices for communicating and working with legislators, explore the key components of OER friendly policies, and outline effective ways to organize and mobilize constituents. We will look at these principles in practice, using OpenStax's work in Texas over the past 3 years as an example of successful OER advocacy.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. I've devoted my career to advocating for open education to benefit students — starting back when I was an undergraduate student myself frustrated with expensive textbooks in the information-rich world we live in. My ex... Read More →
avatar for Scott Hochberg

Scott Hochberg

Policy Advisor, OpenStax
I served twenty years as a member of the Texas House of Representatives, specializing in education issues, and passed Texas first OER legislation, as well as other open government measures. Talk to me about effectively telling the OER story to policymakers.
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, OpenStax, Rice University
Daniel Williamson manages the day to day operations of OpenStax, using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination. A Rice University graduate, and passionate advocate of equity in educat... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Royal C - F

2:00pm

The Effect of Open Educational Resources (OER) Adoption on Learning in a Community College: A Multilevel Modeling Approach
With the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement, many institutions started to embed OER in their curriculum for both financial and pedagogical benefits. The current study examines the effect of OER on student learning in a systematic manner by incorporating both student-level and course-level characteristics in a multilevel modeling approach.

Data from 42 courses offered in a community college in Virginia in summer and fall 2016 semesters were collected and used in the current study. Among the 42 courses, there were 40 courses employed both traditional and OER-based curriculum in different sections. Those courses include a wide range of disciplines, such as business, mathematics, computer programming, biology, chemistry, history, music, and sports. OER adoption was considered as a treatment condition, and its effect on student learning was examined in this study. In addition to OER treatment, nine covariates at student-level were included in the model to control for individual differences. At the course-level, ten predictors which were calculated as aggregated variables from the student level were included in the model to explain the difference in OER adoption effect.

The results show that the effect varies across different courses with a majority of courses favoring OER, compared with non-OER. The variation in the effect can be partially explained by course-level characteristics.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, BYU
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Open Education Group at Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →
avatar for Linda Williams

Linda Williams

Professor, Business Administration, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for te... Read More →



Wednesday October 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Terrace A - C

2:00pm

Through the Valley of the Shadow of Creative Commons: Converting a Composition II Class to OER (Faculty & Librarian Collaboration)
Austin Community College (ACC) is the lead college in a Texas Consortium, a recipient of the Achieving the Dream OER Degree Initiative Grant. Faculty are involved in developing and reviewing courses to create an OER degree pathway in General Studies.

One of the courses in the degree pathway is Composition II. Composition II at ACC focuses on critical thinking skills through analyzing short stories and writing compositions. There are many, many short stories in the public domain. The main objective was finding stories that meet the course learning outcomes and the OER grant guidelines. Handouts and other instruction were necessary to develop to support analysis skills and replace textbook instruction.

Adjunct Professor Tina Buck and Head Librarian Carrie Gits worked together to create materials to meet the objective of both the Comp II curriculum and the OER AtD Grant guidelines.

The presenters will share their tips on the process and collaboration. Final comments from students who participated in two OER sections of the pilot class will also be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Gits

Carrie Gits

Head Librarian/Associate Professor, Austin Community College Library Services
I am a librarian at Austin Community College. ACC is one of the participating institutions in the AtD OER Degree Initiative Grant. I serve on the grant team and am involved in various aspects of the grant, at this point primarily faculty training and support.


Wednesday October 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Imperial

2:00pm

Empowering Faculty and Staff to Use OER at the University of Hawai'i
As a system, the University of Hawai'i faces unique barriers against and opportunities for the adoption of Open Educational Resources. As part of a larger advocacy strategy, the UH OER initiative is demystifying production workflows and visual/learning design principles, as well as beginning the process of skilling up staff to handle growing requests for expertise working with OER. This session will explain our process of empowering faculty and staff to take part in course and content design processes that put control back in the hands of instructional faculty, and provide a glimpse into the big picture plan for connecting our Open Education efforts with the rest of the globe.

Speakers
avatar for Billy Meinke

Billy Meinke

OER Technologist, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa



Wednesday October 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Barcelona

2:30pm

Break
Wednesday October 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Royal Ballroom

3:00pm

Small Steps to Equity through OER
At our suburban community college outside Seattle, a student population largely composed of refugee, immigrant, and international students forces equity issues to the surface. We believe OER offers hope for our students, making education more affordable and inclusive of their many cultures. We will discuss a set of small, practical strategies we use to enhance equity through OER, piggybacking on existing equity discussions happening at our college.

Since we don't have a single person coordinating OER on our campus and we lack a dedicated funding source for OER implementation, we will show what can be done using creative methods of evangelism and funding. Luckily, we have a strong collaboration between the library, instructional design, the bookstore, and the faculty at Highline College.

Because many of our students don't have reliable access to the internet when off campus, it's important that we also make inexpensive print versions of OER available to students. We will discuss a project in which we compared printing costs from various sources to identify the most affordable and adaptable method for our faculty and bookstore.

We will also discuss department projects, such as how the mathematics department uses a free textbook they provide to students to remove the cost, and how they use it to teach students to be effective and efficient learners. Students scribbling in the book inspired instructors to rethink the curriculum; in effect, blurring the line between OER and open education pedagogy.

OER projects on our campus encompass a wide variety of disciplines such as English, adult basic education, ESL, and philosophy, so all of our librarians are versed in OER and assist faculty with implementing OER. We'll talk about resources we've developed to help us with this de-centralized work.

Our goal is to provide session attendees with ideas they can implement on their own campuses, and we want to hear their ideas also.

Speakers
avatar for Hara Brook

Hara Brook

Reference Librarian, Highline College
avatar for Deborah Moore

Deborah Moore

Reference Librarian/Information Literacy Lead, Highline College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Madrid

3:00pm

Strategic Partnerships for Open Educational Resources at Scale
In 2015, the Provost charged an OER Task Force to plan for the sustainable and scalable adoption and creation of open and affordable course content in support of the Penn State strategic focus on access and affordability. This presentation will describe the partnership model that has emerged from the work of that Task Force. Central units including University Libraries and the Teaching and Learning with Technology unit within central IT emerged as leaders on open and affordable course content with a strategy for increased collaboration between the two and similarly aligned units throughout Penn State.

In addition to unit-level partnership, a model of embedding open and affordable course content support into strategically aligned initiatives has emerged as well. In particular, the placement of open and affordable course content support into the general education revision will be discussed. During the spring of 2017, proposals were sought for faculty who were interested in summer support to develop integrative studies course(s) in support of a new general education requirement. In addition to other support, faculty were able to select whether they wanted to make their course open or more affordable as part of the grant-funded support made available to them. This session will present the partnerships and alignment that lead to tis program and the results of that strategy.

Finally, open and affordable course content adoption and creation have emerged as a key strategies in support of Penn State's goal of Transforming Education. This session will situate these initiatives within the Penn State strategic plan framework.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Royal C - F

3:00pm

How Student Usage Patterns of Adaptive Courseware Affect Learning Outcomes
Previous research on OER efficacy has analyzed student outcomes by comparing courses employing open source textbooks with courses employing commercial textbooks. This research takes a more granular approach, not just looking at whether a course employs OER, but rather looking at how different patterns of student usage of adaptive courseware affect student learning.

For the courses analyzed, Lumen Learning's adaptive courseware platform ("Waymaker") was employed. Waymaker was designed to encourage student metacognition, but to what extent was this successful? That depends on how it was actually used by students.

Waymaker modules include a formative pretest, a number of short formative assessments within the module and an end-of module summative posttest. The pretest provides information to students about what parts of the module they already know well and which parts do they still need to learn. As the student works through the module, after interacting with each bit of content, he or she takes a one or two question quiz to give them immediate feedback about how well they learned the material. Finally, a comprehensive end of module quiz provides information about whether or not the student has mastered the material in the module.

This presentation will catalog the different patterns of student usage of Waymaker.

- Are students working through the Waymaker modules regularly and systematically (e.g. to match the pace & coverage of what occurs during class sessions), or are students waiting until just before exams to bunch/cram their work with Waymaker just before exams?

- Are students taking the different assessments?

- How are students responding to the formative information provided by the assessments (e.g, are they putting more effort into those areas Waymaker says they haven't mastered)?

Last, the presentation will report the results of statistical analyses to estimate the effects of different usage practices on student learning.

Speakers
avatar for Pablo Castillo-Vasquez

Pablo Castillo-Vasquez

Student of economics, University of Mary Washington
I am a student of economics and am working in collaboration with Dr. Greenlaw as his research assistant. Originally from Chile, missing the West coast and Pacific Ocean so much! Also, previous student of engineering at UTFSM in Valparaiso, Chile and business ad. at NOVA, Alexand... Read More →
avatar for Steven Greenlaw

Steven Greenlaw

Professor of Economics, University of Mary Washington


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Terrace A - C

3:00pm

Secrets of an OER Champion
Linda Williams, Faculty OER Lead at Tidewater Community College will share her experiences as an OER Champion for the Z Degrees at TCC. After leading TCC's OER initiatives since 2013, Professor Williams has gained insight into what it means to be an OER advocate. Whether you are the champion or trying to identify potential champions at your institution, this session will provide key characteristics and traits that make faculty advocates successful. Professor Williams will also share the successes and challenges of leading faculty driven OER adoption initiatives, including recruiting, managing and supporting faculty adopters. Participants will leave this session with information that can be immediately applied to their own OER initiatives, regardless of their scope or scale.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Williams

Linda Williams

Professor, Business Administration, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for te... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Valencia

3:00pm

The Critical Role of Faculty in Growing Your OER Initiative
In today's world of higher education, everyone is being asked to do much more with much less. So when members of Northern Essex Community College's Textbook Task Force decided to launch a pilot Open Educational Resources initiative, we knew having support at every level was critical to its success. In this presentation, we will share with you our process for a campus-wide acceptance of OER and the important role early adopters played in the fast growth of the OER movement at NECC.

A brief overview of NECC's OER project will be shared, which outlines a significant return on investment with student savings of more than $815,000 in a few short years. The focus of the presentation will be on the faculty role in securing funding, motivating other faculty to get involved, creating partnerships and sharing resources. The mindset change that occurred in most cases will also be discussed because what started as a way to save students money has truly changed the way many of our faculty are teaching and more importantly, how our students are learning.

Speakers
avatar for Jody Carson

Jody Carson

Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, Northern Essex Community College
avatar for Sue Tashjian

Sue Tashjian

Coordinator of Instructional Technolgoy, Northern Essex Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Imperial

3:00pm

Students' View about the Adoption of Open Educational Resources to Reduce Statistics Anxiety
This presentation will include three parts. First, we will report the instructional strategies, identified from former studies, used to reduce statistics anxiety caused by 1) worth of statistics, 2) interpretation anxiety, 3) test and class anxiety, 4) computation self-concept, 5) fear of asking for help, and 6) fear of statistics teachers. Second, we will share the experience how we assist three instructors in introductory statistics/quantitative research methodology courses to select and customize OERs through reuse, redistribution, revision, and remix. The customization of OER closely aligned with instructional strategies we proposed to reduce statistics anxiety. All OERs we adopted in this study were collected from 12 OER repository websites. The OERs used in this study included scholarly articles, datasets, simulations, video/screencast tutorials, comics or cartoons, and lesson plans Third, we will present students' perception toward the use of OER to reduce statistics anxiety. The participants in this study were students who enrolled in 5 introductory statistics/ quantitative research methodology courses at a university located in the southeastern United States. These participants came from different programs or departments. There were 113 participants in total. All participants in this study were pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree at the time this study was being conducted. The presentation will benefit both OER development and curriculum design.

Speakers
avatar for Yu-Ju Lin

Yu-Ju Lin

Instructional Designer, Georgia State University
avatar for Hengtao Tang

Hengtao Tang

The Pennsylvania State University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Barcelona

3:00pm

Rebellions are Built on Hope: Joining Forces to Support OER in a Restrictive Institutional Environment
Librarians and instructional designers (IDs) from a university in the U.S. will describe the partnership formed to promote no-cost textbook solutions (OER, library-sourced) in the face of a restrictive environment. The institution is divided in two tiers: the President's Office, which oversees non-academic functions such as Business Services, and the Provost's Office, which is responsible for teaching and learning. This creates an inherent tension concerning course materials and revenue, troubling the conception of education as a fundamentally shared practice. Our group aimed to promote change at the university level, while also collaborating to facilitate the efforts of faculty.

Typically, the group meets with faculty to discuss objectives, and open or library-sourced materials are located. Copyright permissions are reviewed by a librarian, and materials are created and integrated into the course by IDs. Simply put, the resources could not be created without the collaboration of librarians and IDs. Highlighted will be one scenario in which the group collaborated with a faculty member to adopt existing resources, overcome issues such as copyright and licensing, and create an open text in ePub format to replace the traditional text. This scenario prompted some challenges with regards to time and scalability; however, the end product proved valuable for both students and faculty. Students expressed gratitude with the faculty's effort of providing free materials. In turn, the product was shared with other instructors, ensuring further equitable access for students.

We will identify future directions and touch on areas of interest such as playing an active role in the campus bookstore contract negotiations, securing grant funding for OER opportunities, and participating in Faculty Senate. We hope that our efforts will result in institutional change and a stronger OER effort, and hope that this panel will help others identify action points in their own contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Penny Beile

Penny Beile

Associate Director, Univ of Central Florida Libraries
AD

Aimee deNoyelles

Instructional Designer, UCF Center for Distributed Learning
JR

John Raible

Instructional Designer, UCF Center for Distributed Learning


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Terrace D - F

3:00pm

Collaborate and divide 2: A second year of cross-country sharing
Since the 12th Annual Open Education Conference, staff members at Boise State University and Clemson University have sought to establish and grow institution-wide initiatives around open educational resources (OER). Despite holding a shared identity as public universities, these two institutions –one located in the Northwestern and one in the Southeastern United States –harbor distinct cultures, climates, and agendas as they relate to the sustainable implementation and support of OER. Simply stated, staff from Boise State and Clemson somehow continue to find common solutions for supporting OER despite their differences.

Over the last two years, librarians, researchers, technologists, and instructional designers of both universities have consulted each other, joined interinstitutional networks, launched pilot programs, rallied student groups, cultivated faculty learning communities, modified digital infrastructure, and shared a few resources under the notion that open access to education complements the missions of their respective institutions. And while projects have been implemented at the institutional level, certain variables remain that help and hinder proliferation of OER at each university.

If vague support from senior administrators, limited resources for sharing and modifying texts, inconsistent faculty awareness and availability, varying priorities between campus stakeholders, and uncertainty about recurring funding can be considered common threats to long-lasting OER programs in higher ed., the members of this panel (having faced these issues firsthand) continue to claim that the best approach toward tackling such problems is one that transparently spans disciplines, departments, and institutions.

Through much sharing, gratitude, and hopefulness, panel members will discuss their recent experiences in driving, supporting, and sustaining OER together from opposite corners of the U.S.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Casper

Bob Casper

Instructional Design Specialist, Boise State University - IDEA Shop
Bob Casper has been at Boise State University, in Idaho's capital, for over a decade. He currently serves a unit of the University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) called Instructional Design and Educational Assessment (IDEA Shop) as an Instructional Design Specialist wo... Read More →
KD

Kirsten Dean

Instruction & OER Librarian, Clemson University Libraries
Information literacy instruction
avatar for Jonathan Lashley

Jonathan Lashley

Senior Instructional Technologist, Boise State University
avatar for Rob Nyland

Rob Nyland

eCampus Research & Innovation Team Manager, Boise State University
avatar for Amber Sherman

Amber Sherman

Assistant Professor/Librarian, Boise State University
Amber Sherman is an Assistant Professor/ Librarian at Boise State University. She works with faculty and students to showcase their scholarly output, primarily through making their work available via the ScholarWorks website.
avatar for Andrew Wesolek

Andrew Wesolek

Head of Digital Scholarship, Clemson University
Andrew Wesolek serves as Head of Digital Scholarship at Clemson University. In this role, he captures the intellectual output of Clemson University and works to make it openly available to any researcher with an internet connection. He also works closely with Clemson University P... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

3:00pm

UnCommon Women - the women in the commons
UnCommon Women sits at the intersection of Open, Social Change and Tech. To celebrate the work and opportunities for women and to push for equal representation. To support the women in the field of open, we need clear paths to advancement, mentorship opportunities and ensure individuals identifying as female have a visible presence in leadership. We will announce survey results of women in the movement on the panel. Pulling together women across levels of experience working OpenEd, this panel is convened to discuss experiences, challenges and successes, and to show the strength of women working in the open.

Speakers
avatar for Francesca Carpenter

Francesca Carpenter

Associate Director, Achieving the Dream
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
avatar for Kelsey Merkley

Kelsey Merkley

Public Lead, Creative Commons Canada
I've been working in The Open for 5 years and across two continents. I've been extremely fortunate to hold the role of CC Public Lead in South Africa and Canada. I am no longer trying to make CC-BRAAI-SA pun a thing but searching for a good Canada Open pun.


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Grenada

3:30pm

Perceived Effects of Open Textbook Usage on Secondary Science Classroom Practice
Open Educational Resources (OER) provide openly licensed alternatives to commercial instructional materials. Proponents of K-12 OER suggest that their benefits include cost savings, increased access, improved quality, and increased teacher professionalism or empowerment. While the small body of K-12 OER research is growing, perceived benefits of K-12 OER usage have not yet been thoroughly proven. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand whether certain potential benefits were being realized by a group of secondary teachers using open science textbooks. In surveys and interviews, teachers were asked to describe their classroom practice before and after adopting an open textbook, including practices relating to openness. Teachers were also asked to rate the quality of the open textbooks they were using and textbooks used previously. Early analysis suggests that while teachers appreciated the flexibility and low cost of their open textbooks, adoption of open textbooks did not greatly impact classroom practice, nor promote open practice. The researcher will present findings from the study and lead a discussion about the implications for educators, researchers, and the future of open textbooks.

Speakers
SM

Stacie Mason

Brigham Young University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Valencia

3:30pm

Is the price still right? A continued evaluation of open vs traditional textbooks on student performance
The increasing cost of textbooks pose a financial burden for students, with some researchers hypothesizing that the high price of course materials may result in students opting to not purchase the text and being under-prepared for the course or taking fewer classes per semester, both resulting in a delay to graduation (Florida Virtual Campus, 2012). On the other hand, the adoption of Open textbooks have been associated with improved student grades, lower withdrawal rates, and higher concurrent and subsequent enrollments (Fischer, Hilton, Robinson, & Wiley 2015; Hilton & Laman, 2012).

Continuing the evaluation of Endes & Howard (2016), the goal of this study was to determine whether student performance at a large open-enrollment Alaska university would differ when using traditional publisher materials compared to open educational resources. Comparing additional data collected over four semesters (one using traditional textbook materials, three using Open educational resources), there appear to be no statistically significant differences in student performance on unit exams. Student feedback slightly favors the use of Open resources, with students specifically citing the free Open textbook as a factor associated with their success. Considerations for adoption and implementation will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Howard

Veronica Howard

Assistant Professor, University of Alaska Anchorage



Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Terrace A - C

3:30pm

World Religions in Greater Indianapolis: An OER Pilgrimage
With great gratitude to the NEH we propose to share a new OER learning resource obtained for our community college during a two year …Bridging Cultures' NEH grant. Fifteen Ivy Tech teachers from 8 disciplines created 150 one-page Teaching Modules (TM) on five world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism & Buddhism. These TM are publically archived by IUPUI, our four-year partner school on this grant. Thus, this OER resource is readily available for community college teachers across Indiana and (may we propose) across the USA.

We will report the measured response and interpret the results we get in a six month campaign of advocacy for these TM as an OER actively used by teachers at Ivy Tech campuses across the state. We will recruit selected teachers at the Central Indiana Region (the largest in the state) and engage them in adopting and using at least one TM in one of their classes for summer and fall terms. Simultaneously, we will recruit teachers in three other Ivy Tech regions who will also …adopt and use' the TM during the same period. Our findings will give us data to report on the practical aspects of OER advocacy and support when we present a splendid new OER resource. We will set metrics to report on teacher and student interest and engagement, metrics on student learning results, metrics to measure the ease of use for this set of new OER materials. We will interpret our findings to permit judging of the enthusiasm for and even skepticism about the adoption and use of OER resources.

As part of our presentation we will propose to actively recruit teachers from our audience who we hope will be inspired by our advocacy such that we can continue our conversation and possibly plan to use the TM at their school during the next year. We will propose that our findings for this …national' roll out of our TM would be a wonderful …adoptions and use' story we can report findings on at the 2018 OER conference.

Speakers
MA

Milan Andrejevich

Professor of History/Political Science,, Ivy Tech Community College
JJ

John (Jack) Cooney

Assoc Prof/Prog Chair, Liberal Arts, Ivy Tech Community College
SS

Sarah Shepler

Prof/Program Chair, Bus Admin, Ivy Tech Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Imperial

3:30pm

From Seeds to Flowers: Growing our garden of OER courses to fulfill the ATD grant
Until summer 2016, there was no organized effort at PCC for the adoption and utilization of open education resources. Seeds of interest existed as individual faculty members developed some OER courses, but their work was not widely shared or recognized. However, those involved in the individual efforts understood how Pima's students could reap tremendous benefits from OER courses, and it was that thought that spurred our application for and eventual award of the Achieving the Dream grant. Now, as we attempt to create the courses for a fully online OER pathway to the AA Liberal Arts, we have one year of experience and insight into what it takes to grow OER courses in sustainable and collaborative ways. Join a team of PCC instructional designers as they share their experiences and best practices for developing a design team, defining the framework for the project, navigating successful partnerships with faculty, and addressing specific challenges finding and utilizing open resources.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Hauser

Christopher Hauser

Instructional Designer, Pima Community College
avatar for Eugene Jars

Eugene Jars

Instruction Designer, Pima Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Barcelona

3:30pm

New York State's Major Funding for Open Educational Resources
This panel will discuss the recently announced $8M funding from the NY legislature for OER and what it means for OER in the state of New York.

Speakers
avatar for Alexis Clifton

Alexis Clifton

Executive Director, SUNY OER Services
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Director of Libraries, Monroe Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 4:25pm
Royal C - F

4:00pm

Openness Promotes Academic Non-Monogamy: The Case of the OERu-KPU Open Marriage
The Open Educational Resources Universitas (OERu) is an international network of +30 tertiary institutions from six world regions that have created a parallel universe to improve higher education accessibility. Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) partnered with the OERu to help manifest its commitments to Quality, Relevance, and Reputation. The OERu-KPU open marriage is in its 4th year and has produced the WikiEducator-based, open online course: Introduction to Psychology. This presentation will explain the nature of this partnership with special reference to the role of faculty, administrators, and learning technologists. Interestingly, the same faculty who developed KPU's OERu course also created an OERu-Thompson Rivers University course on Research Methods. Is it time we acknowledge that openness promotes academic non-monogamy?

Speakers
avatar for Farhad Dastur

Farhad Dastur

Faculty Member, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where I teach evolutionary psychology, perception, and cognitive ergonomics. My research interests include sensory perception in pregnant women, the determinants of intersection collisions between motorcycles and cars, the... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Terrace D - F

4:00pm

Being True To The 5Rs: Publishing OER That Are Easy To Reuse And Remix
The open education community is faithful to making resources easily reused, redistributed, and retained. However, the open education community stands to improve the ways in which it makes content available for revision or to be remixed. To remain true to the 5Rs put forth in the Open Content Definition, it is not enough to apply an open license to content. There are technical considerations that must be given careful attention to achieve maximum openness and be true to the open philosophy.



In this presentation, Cody Taylor, an Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Oklahoma Libraries, will discuss why only publishing open content in consumable formats, PDF for example, is an impediment to the aim of the open movement. Also introduced will be a tool developed at OU Libraries to ensure that open content created there is shared to its maximum potential. In its fourth year, the open educational resources team at OU Libraries has iterated several open publishing approaches. Experiences gleaned from those iterations will be shared as well as the motivations for our current trajectory.

Speakers
avatar for Cody Taylor

Cody Taylor

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Oklahoma Libraries



Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Madrid

4:00pm

Community + a plan = 18,000+ new students impacted in one year
Eleven schools from across the United States began the OpenStax Institutional Partner program in July 2017 and have already increased the number students impacted by over 18,000 per year, saving an additional $1.7 million per year! This presentation will cover the basic structure used in the program, including the emphasis on a support community, to ensure success and use the data from the program to highlight the top strategies that work to greatly increase adoptions in a short period of time.

Speakers
avatar for Jody Carson

Jody Carson

Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, Northern Essex Community College
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, OpenStax, Rice University
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college re... Read More →
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER Project Manager, Lansing Community College
I'm a librarian and the OER Project Manager at Lansing Community College. I would love to talk to you about your OER projects and how it has impacted student learning and faculty's teaching in your campuses. I'm also one of the Open Education Group Research Fellow for 2017-2018... Read More →
avatar for Kathy Labadorf

Kathy Labadorf

Info Literacy, Open Ed Resources&Social Sci Lib, UConn Library
Leading a burgeoning OER Initiative at UConn. Excited about the Social Justice elements of Open and Creative Commons licenses. Talk to me about Open Pedagogy and how to grow that initiative at a Research 1 University!
avatar for Sue Tashjian

Sue Tashjian

Coordinator of Instructional Technolgoy, Northern Essex Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

4:00pm

Yes We Can! OER Science Labs with Regional Flare
Developers of OER courses in the sciences are challenged by how to provide relevant, open laboratory content to students. The presenter will share how he overcame that challenge by creating a fully online OER version of BIO 100IN- Biological Concepts. He will share how he first altered an Open Stax textbook to include regional content, and how he created a series of open labs where students utilize common household items and processes to conduct in-home experiments. BIO 100IN is one course in the online, OER AA Liberal Arts degree pathway PCC faculty and staff are completing as an Achieving the Dream grantee.

Speakers
JK

Janice Kempster

Dean of Distance Education, Pima Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Valencia

4:00pm

What Did Jane Think? Faculty Perceptions of the Strengths and Weaknesses of Open Textbooks & Implications for Authors & Publishers
The Open Textbook Network's Open Textbook Library is a searchable catalog of more than 350 open textbooks. Since April 2012, faculty and instructors at the Open Textbook Network's more than 370 member campuses nationwide have authored more than 900 reviews of these open textbooks, concurrent with their participation in professional development workshops and with the incentive of a small stipend. In the same spirit of sharing that is highlighted by the OpenEd17 conference theme, these CC-BY-licensed reviews are available in the Open Textbook Library for consultation and reference by faculty and instructors everywhere who are exploring open textbooks for adoption in their course instruction.

In 2017 we have undertaken a qualitative analysis of all open textbook reviews that were published in the Open Textbook Library before April 2017. Our research asked, what do faculty consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of open textbooks, and how can these perceptions inform the work of open textbook authors and publishers? In this presentation, we will share findings from our qualitative analysis of reviews; highlight additional research studies that have considered faculty perceptions of open textbook/OER strengths and weaknesses; suggest how the work of open textbook authors and publishers may be informed by faculty perceptions; and suggest research questions for further study.

Merinda McLure is the Health & Human Sciences Librarian at the University of Colorado Boulder and a 2016-2018 OER Research Fellow.

Olga Belikov is a graduate student at Brigham Young University and a 2016-2018 OER Research Fellow.

David Ernst is founder and executive director of the Open Textbook Network.

Speakers
avatar for Olga Belikov

Olga Belikov

Student, Brigham Young University
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improv... Read More →
MM

Merinda McLure

Health & Human Sciences Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Terrace A - C

4:00pm

Around the World with OER: Sharing Meaning Cross-Culturally
OERs represent examples of a global phenomenon in an innovative approach that promote unrestricted access as a possible solution for bridging the knowledge divide in education. A large number of OERs initiatives are currently distributed globally and are seen as a way to meet educational needs. Given the purported importance of OERs in the international arena, it is critical to examine the global understanding of OERs.

Although OERs have successfully captured researchers and practitioner's attention in promoting the knowledge as a public good, expanding understanding, awareness, utilization, and adoption from individual and institutions to publish is another challenge. It is our argument that addressing these challenge must involve examining the global understanding of OERs.

This study is driven by the following three questions:

1. What are global understandings of OERs?

2. What are the awareness, perceived benefits and challenges of OER and how do they differ cross-culturally?

3. What are the current utilization and adoption of OERs in participating countries?

This study employs in-depth survey research and interviews to investigate the understanding of OER at universities in Botswana, China, Namibia, Taiwan, and Thailand. Using a survey approach and interview, the authors developed a set of questionnaires and interview questions, with the intention of understanding the global perspective of open educational resources from participant countries.



Data collection for the present study is on going and will be completed in July 2017. Completed data from Taiwan and Thailand indicate that there is a varied understating of what OERs and MOOCs are. Although the acronyms have become the terms dujor in academic discourses and international education it appear that there are varied definitions of the concepts which educators and researchers alike would be well served to be aware of and consider.

Speakers
TI

Tutaleni I. Asino

Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Grenada

4:00pm

Sharing 21 Years of Experience in Authoring and Using Open Educational Resources
In 1995, long before Open Educational Resources were called OERS, I began developing my first online open resource materials for use by my own microbiology students as well as any students having Internet access. This eventually evolved into an entire microbiology course, taken mainly by students entering the allied health professions, consisting of interconnected and mostly self-authored OERs. Both lecture and laboratory OERs are openly available on my faculty website (http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html) while all of my lecture OERs are available on SoftChalk Cloud (http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/SoftChalk%20BIOL%20230/Softchalk_index.html). This includes 138 SoftChalk lessons, 250 original Flash animations, over a thousand original illustrations, photographs, and photomicrographs, 38 YouTube videos on laboratory techniques, and many concept maps and self quizzes.

This presentation will provide practical tips on including a variety of best practices and technologies in authoring OERs as well as developing a complete 4 credit course consisting entirely of OERs. Some of my experiences in using OERs to help fulfill the mission of large multi-campus community college will also be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Gary Kaiser

Gary Kaiser

Professor, Microbiology, The Community College of Baltimore County
I received my Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Maryland, College park in 1975 after completing undergraduate and graduate work at Northern Illinois University. This is my 48th year teaching microbiology at the Community College of Baltimore County and I can't imagine... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Imperial

4:00pm

OER and what IDEA shop is doing at Boise State University
Boise State University is a relatively new entrant to the area of OER in higher education. However, it has already developed a faculty professional development model. This model is characterized by a graduated progression, wherein faculty have the opportunity of experiencing professional development on OER through various short and long term programs like hour long workshops, single day institutes, semester long faculty learning communities, faculty mentorships, and grant projects. It is facilitated by Instructional designers and technologists from the IDEA (Instructional Design and Educational Assessment) shop in collaboration with LTS (Learning Technology Solutions). Challenges faced and lessons learned will be discussed, which might be useful for faculty professional developers looking to implement a similar program in their organizations.

This presentation will provide a brief overview of the OER professional development model at Boise State University. We will present background/timeline information on why and how OER professional development started at Boise State. We will talk about each of the components of the model, elaborating on the process of call for applications, participant selection, learning content and method. We will look at outside factors, Student Government involvement, and dealings with the school's administration. We will also talk about challenges faced and lessons learned which might be useful for faculty professional developers looking to implement a similar program in their organizations. The participants will engage in active discussions (think-pair-share) and share how OER is being implemented in their institutions as well as discuss ideas on how the current Boise State model can be improved.

Speakers
avatar for Devshikha Bose

Devshikha Bose

Instructional Design Consultant, Boise State University
I earned my Ph.D. in Instructional Design from Idaho State University. My background includes Masters degrees in Secondary Education and English. Before joining the team at Instructional Design and Academic Assessment (IDEA shop), I worked as an Instructional Designer at Brenau U... Read More →
avatar for Bob Casper

Bob Casper

Instructional Design Specialist, Boise State University - IDEA Shop
Bob Casper has been at Boise State University, in Idaho's capital, for over a decade. He currently serves a unit of the University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) called Instructional Design and Educational Assessment (IDEA Shop) as an Instructional Design Specialist wo... Read More →



Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Barcelona

5:00pm

Evening Reception
This evening's reception is sponsored by Follett.

Wednesday October 11, 2017 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Grand Ballroom A
 
Thursday, October 12
 

8:30am

CVCC's Continuing Quest for OER Degrees
Our goal at Central Virginia Community College (CVCC) is to help our current and future students earn their degrees with efficiency and affordability. We will describe the challenges and rewards of developing OER courses that support the Associate in Arts and Sciences transfer degree programs. CVCC has embraced the Guided Pathways Initiative in order to streamline the curricula and enable students to complete their degree programs within a reasonable length of time. To make this goal attainable, we are focusing on cost-cutting strategies while maintaining quality standards and rigors of the educational environment. We are meeting the challenges of providing a well-rounded general educational experience during the first two years of the student's academic journey, by re-designing the existing required and elective curricular offerings as OER or low-cost courses. We are focusing on re-designing or developing several elective courses in the Natural Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences to provide students with a variety of choices as they explore their individual interests, while still within the bounds of the Guided Pathways model. We will describe some of the strategies we have implemented as we move forward towards our goal of having OER or low-cost degree programs at our college that serve the needs of our students and meet the requirements of the four-year institutions where most of these students will eventually transfer to complete their baccalaureate degrees.

Speakers
JD

Juville Dario-Becker

Professor of Biology, Central Virginia Community College
CL

Cynthia Lofaso

Central Virginia Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 8:55am
Imperial

8:30am

Excelsior's Open Online Writing Lab: a community college collaboration to improve students' basic writing skills
Writing, critical thinking, and reading comprehension are essential for academic and career success. Yet, adults in the U.S. score below average on these basic literacy skills. Excelsior's open multimedia Online Writing Lab (owl.excelsior.edu), developed in partnership with 8 community colleges, is a tool designed to address this issue.

The OWL applies best practices in education technology and instructional design to deliver students an immersive user experience. Over the past seven years, the OWL has secured over $2 million in grant funds and garnered 12 national awards for educational innovation. These innovations are based on a wealth of research indicating that greater engagement, scaffolding, and immediate feedback lead to increased student learning.

Two multi-campus, controlled pilot studies demonstrate the OWL's effectiveness. The OWL increased final grades by 6.62 points, improved student writing in 3 of 5 areas on the AAC&U writing VALUE rubric, and strengthened argumentative essay writing.

Designed to be easily incorporated into traditional, online, or blended courses, the OWL offers a free and easy-to-use textbook alternative. According to a 2014 report by U.S. PIRG, textbook costs are a major obstacle to student success. The free OWL replaces textbooks in English 101 and 201 at Excelsior, for a total savings of $153,000 in student costs annually.

OWL modules include: The Writing Process, Research & Citations, Rhetorical Styles, Argument & Critical Thinking, Online Writing & Presentations, Grammar Essentials, Avoiding Plagiarism, ESL Writing, Educator Resources, and writing process game – Paper Capers.

Presenters will review these modules, as well as demonstrate how to create Owlets (customized versions of OWL) and embed interactive writing activities into course materials. They will also debut the new open Online Reading Comprehension Lab, set to pilot in spring 2017. Come learn how to transform your approach to writing and reading instruction.

Speakers
MA

Michelle Abeyta

Project Coordinator, Excelsior College
CA

Christie Allred

Professor, English Puente Co-Coordinator, San Diego Mesa College


Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 8:55am
Terrace A - C

8:30am

Assessing the Impact of Open Pedagogy on Student Skills Mastery and Perception of Relevance
Open educational resources (OER) tear down the barriers of access and cost that are most harmful to underprivileged students, but how OER permit us to transform our classrooms has often been overlooked. With adaptable, interactive "open pedagogy," we may discover powerful ways to empower students to learn based on their unique skills and goals.

This session will share the results of a 2016-7 classroom research study (in progress at the time of writing this proposal) assessing the impact of open pedagogy and resources on student skills mastery and perception across modalities. Approximately 200 students in English 101 and 102 participated. All sections used the same free OER, but about half were given traditional assignments (i.e. formal essays and grammar exercises) and the other half were given "open" assignments that involved designing and remixing open resources. Assignment results and other course metrics were used to investigate the impact on student skills mastery and anonymous surveys were used to investigate the impact on the students' perception of the relevance of English class to their lives outside of school. Because of the study's design, we can also evaluate the effects of this treatment on subsets of participants by their course participation (in-class or online) and modality (traditional or flex/hybrid).

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Bloom

Matthew Bloom

English Faculty, Scottsdale Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 8:55am
Terrace D - F

8:30am

Leveraging Open Environments and Individual Passion to Make Progress Outside of Institutions
Until more traditional educational institutions decide to address the many issues related to open education, we must organize beyond our org charts and work outside of standard institutional infrastructures. Affinity groups organized around shared interests in open education can provide the structure to address pressing but daunting issues that our institutions may not.

In this presentation, we will focus on two such groups. Both groups are addressing needs that are not currently being addressed by traditional educational institutions.

The UW-Madison Open Meetup began when a few individuals noticed activities related to open access, open data, and open educational resources cropping up independently in across campus. Using widely-available resources, they convened a community to share information, interests and energy around openness and the academy. Among this group's successes has been the creation of a related community of practice -- a local users group of faculty and support staff who are all using Pressbooks, an openly licensed authoring and publishing tool.

The Rebus Community for Open Textbook Creation is a collaboration intended to build a global, connected network of Open Textbook creators, develop an open textbook publishing process, and create software and tools to support that process. While this community has some dedicated staff support and institutional partners, it leverages the energy and experiences of members from around the world to work toward ambitious goals.

In addition to sharing our experiences with these communities, the presenters will discuss how these experiences can inform creation, development, and sustenance of similar groups.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Nelson

Carrie Nelson

Dir. of Scholarly Communication, UW-Madison



Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 8:55am
Madrid

8:30am

Why We Share: Tapping Into Faculty's Stories of Going Open
When a large public university set out to offer an alternative textbook grant program, they weren't sure who would apply, and for what reasons. What they weren't expecting was such a varied response for why people felt compelled to join this call to action. For instance, USU's Professional and Technical Writing program has a demonstrated commitment to social justice. Using an OER not only fulfills programmatic commitments to social justice through open access, but would enable this professor to integrate supplemental readings without students feeling as though they are investing in a textbook that goes unused part of the term. A professor teaching a broadcast journalism course was seeking to create a video integrated text to push the boundaries of a traditional textbook, more in line with such a video dependent subject. A third was interested in creating a book on social media case studies. The link between all of these disparate courses is that the professors reveled in the idea of sharing and opening up their courses or having their books being published with an open license so that further elaboration and collaboration could occur, thus increasing the quality of each resource. What's the key to furthering these types of initiatives at other college campuses? Tapping into the stories of the faculty members and hearing from them about whether these newly created resources have enabled innovation in the classroom and opened the doors to learning.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Davis

Erin Davis

Library Coordinator of Regional Campuses and E-Learning, Utah State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 8:55am
Valencia

8:30am

Multiply K-12 OER
The panel presentation on the Multiply K-12 OER media project explore what OER means for K-12 education. Through a series of interviews with OER scholars and practicing K-12 teachers, the podcasts and videos cover the strengths and challenges of the awareness, use and advocacy of OER for K-12 within Canada and beyond. The 17 podcasts and 3 videos are housed on the Blended and Online Learning and Teaching (BOLT) blog that shares out pedagogical views, research in practice, and professional insights from in-service teachers who work in blended and online environments.The podcasts use interviewee commentary on the following OER topics: a history of OER; the current landscape; benefits to K-12 learning; acceptance; learning with OER; teaching with OER; openness and the open mindset in learning; 8 attributes of Open Pedagogy; the Open Pedagogy model; creating OER policy in Canada; and Canadian copyright and user rights, including K-12 scenarios. The 3 videos cover the following areas: Attributes of Open Community; Attributes of Open Practice; and Albertan Perspectives on OER in K-12 Learning.Due to participatory technologies, K-12 educators are already engaging with OER without being fully aware that they are involved to some degree in OER and a philosophy of openness. Through the Multiply K-12 OER media, all levels of K-12 educators can examine their current understanding and see the future of OER wherever they teach. The sharing out of the media and having teachers elsewhere in the world access these media will be part of the multiplying effect of these podcasts and videos and highlights the changing nature of professional learning in the era of OER. This panel presentation will discuss the media project and the response by educators regarding this OER professional learning for in-service teachers. Funded by the Alberta Open Educational Resources (ABOER) Initiative, the project was made possible through an investment from the Alberta government.

Speakers
avatar for Beatriz de los Arcos

Beatriz de los Arcos

The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Dr Beatriz de los Arcos is a Research Associate in the Institute of Educational Technology at The Open University, UK and Academic Lead for the Global OER Graduate Ne... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Connie Blomgren

Dr. Connie Blomgren

Assistant Professo, Centre for Distance Education - Athabasca University
Dr. Connie Blomgren is an Assistant Professor at the Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University. Dr. Blomgren, in partnership with the Alberta Distance Learning Centre, developed an innovative professional learning offering of graduate level modules (Blended and Online Learning and Teaching -... Read More →
avatar for Royce Kimmons

Royce Kimmons

Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University
avatar for Verena Roberts

Verena Roberts

Learning Specialist - Technology, Rocky View School Division No. 41
I am currently a Technology for Learning Specialist at Rocky View Schools, a K-12 school district in Alberta, Canada. I am also a Leanring Sciences doctoral student with UoC Werkland School of Education. My research focus is on Open Educational Practice (OEP) in K-12 Learning Env... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 9:25am
Barcelona

8:30am

Challenges and Opportunities for Delivering and Using Open Access Materials in Developing Countries
Arizona State University has a number of global education initiatives that deliver educational content to developing areas: the SolarSPELL project, a portable, solar-powered digital library designed to provide educational resources to people without reliable internet or electricity; and the MasterCard Foundation Scholars Community platform, creating a social learning network connecting scholars with tools and resources that can be used to contribute to their local communities. Additionally, the Center for Education through eXploration, focused on science learning through explorative digital experiences, is interested in partnering to develop OERs. The ASU Library supports these initiatives, assisting them with finding OERs, content curation, and consulting about licensing and intellectual property rights.

Using open content is critical to the success of these initiative. These programs require content that is freely available for people everywhere to view, and local teachers and learners need to be able to reuse and repurpose resources for their own needs. Trying to teach about copyright, intellectual property, and licensing on a global scale would make these projects impossible.

Our panelists will discuss their hopes for contributing to a healthier and more informed global society, and share ideas about how to overcome the challenges they face, such as:

How to partner with local educators and curate content for communities with different cultures and contexts? Can we augment their curricula and optimize materials, tools, and interfaces to reflect life in those locations?

How to build capacity in underdeveloped areas to sustain digital educational programs, including: teaching with technology, leveraging content for the curricula, developing information literacy skills, and developing local content?

How to create platforms that are easy to use for a wide variety of teachers and learners that incorporate many ways of understanding, knowing and navigating?

Speakers
LM

Lorrie McAllister

Associate University Librarian for Collections & Strategy, Arizona State University
avatar for Anali Perry

Anali Perry

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Arizona State University Library



Thursday October 12, 2017 8:30am - 9:25am
Grenada

9:00am

Maintaining OER Momentum: What Works in Adult Basic Education
Between 2013 and 2016, the American Institutes for Research led two projects funded by the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) that focused on introducing OER to adult educators of math, science, and ESL. Within each project, teachers received targeted training to learn about OER and how OER can be used, created, evaluated, and shared. Some of these adult educators also engaged in a six month training of trainers. In an attempt to understand what happens after targeted PD ends, we followed-up with participants through an online survey and telephone interviews. This presentation will share the continued practice of adult educators as well as barriers they faced to sustain their use of OER. We will highlight participants' use of OER after the projects ended as well as their successes, the types of supports they need to continue using OER, and what, if any, student impact they have seen. We will also identify and discuss reasons why adult educators stopped using OER after participation in the projects and seek to understand what additional supports can be provided to educators to ensure continued use, development, and sharing of OER. This presentation will also include reference to tools and resources developed by the project for adult educators and OER developed by teachers for their adult learners.

Speakers
DB

Delphinia Brown

Distance Learning Product Manager, American Institutes for Research
AD

Amanda Duffy

Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
Imperial

9:00am

Confessions of a d(OER): Thinking strategically to make OER a vibrant, sustainable part of a campus affordability program.
Open educational resources are a direct path to student savings at almost every institution. This is not strictly the case at the University of Wisconsin-Stout.

UW-Stout has a long tradition of providing its students with low-cost textbooks. For over one hundred years, that program has been delivered through different variations of a print textbook rental system provided through a student fee funded model. UW-Stout's students pay about $360 per year for course materials.

In 2012, digital textbooks and adaptive learning platform access codes were included with textbook rental to provide a broader range of classroom tools for faculty and students. The move to digital course content has complicated the landscape of providing a student fee funded textbook program at a low cost. Digital content often costs twice as much to provide to students than in the traditional print rental system. UW-Stout has implemented several strategies to combat the increase in cost. One of these strategies is the inclusion of a vibrant open educational resource program.

OERs offer an excellent opportunity to include quality, low-cost resources to the Stout curriculum and stabilize cost. The decision to utilize OERs has resulted in the Stout Open for Learning and Value in Education (SOLVE) program. The SOLVE Program has been developed to make OERs a critical component of a three-pronged approach to ensuring course content affordability at UW-Stout.

This session will share insight and techniques of how UW-Stout is utilizing strategic vision and a century of institutional knowledge about providing low-cost content to provide a comprehensive, sustainable approach to making OERs an integral part of their affordability approach for the next one hundred years.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Butterfield

Robert Butterfield

Director, Instructional Resources, University of Wisconsin-Stout
I am the Director of Instructional Resources for the University of Wisconsin-Stout. Instructional Resources provides print textbook rentals, e-texts, access codes and other resources in support of our curriculum supported by student fees. We also operate the campus OER program... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
Terrace A - C

9:00am

How Does OER Adoption Impact Classroom Teaching and Learning?
The Affordable Learning Exchange (ALX) at The Ohio State University offers grants to support faculty in replacing traditional textbooks with high-quality open educational resources (OER) and library materials. Through this affordability program, colleagues in the University Libraries, Office of Distance Education and eLearning, and other teaching-oriented units combine their resources to help faculty successfully create or adopt no-cost or low-cost course materials. The faculty in the first cohort adopted OER for 12 courses in Fall 2016, and a second cohort is working on a similar number this year. The first two cohorts are projected to save students nearly $1.3 million annually. Through supporting faculty in the creation and adoption of OER, the team also noticed many faculty were re-thinking their course design, learning objectives, activities, and assessments in ways that seemed more strongly aligned with best pedagogical practices. Our mixed-methods study explores this observation in a more critical and rigorous way through interviews with faculty who adopt ALX-funded OER. The interview protocol includes questions about if and how the adoption of OER encouraged changes in the course's breadth or depth of coverage, proportion of time spent on different activities (e.g., lecture versus group work versus discussion), and number or types of assessments. In addition, faculty discussed whether and how student learning changed in terms of students' level of motivation and engagement, quality of participation, quality of collaboration with fellow students, and performance on assessments. This paper will present preliminary results based on qualitative analysis of the 16 interviews conducted with Cohort One faculty adopters to investigate under which conditions OER creation/adoption seemed to encourage changes in course design, how and why design changes occurred, and how those changes impacted the instructor's perception of students' engagement and quality of learning.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Folk

Amanda Folk

Head, Teaching & Learning, The Ohio State University Libraries
MR

Marcos Rivera

Graduate Research Associate, The Ohio State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
Terrace D - F

9:00am

OER and Learning Research -- a unique capability

While many efforts and funders in the open space continue to focus on the role that OER can play in expanding access and reducing cost, far too few practitioners are taking advantage of the unique potential of open resources and practice for fundamentally improving instruction and advancing our scientific understanding of human learning. However, open education – both in licensing of materials and in transparency of practice – has unique capabilities for promoting, identifying and advancing more effective approaches in supporting and educating learners. Learning science continues to identify a bewildering array of potential instructional choices that are unlikely to be usefully explored using traditional RCT studies.  A/B testing and in vivo experimentation offer one path for investigating such instructional complexity, but the variations in materials and interventions necessary for these methods demand open resources. But an open practice is equally necessary: the transparency that is at the heart of open instruction and pedagogy is absolutely required for an authentic consideration of what materials and approaches are best demonstrating evidence of effectively supporting learners. This session posits a unique capability of open education to advance a science-based investigation of effective instructional materials, approaches and pedagogies. The session will facilitate a larger discussion of our capabilities and responsibilities as open educators in identifying, promoting and advancing a science-based agenda in serve of improved outcomes for all learners. Participants will co-develop models for combining open- and evidence-based approaches in service of discovery, and will be positioned to better enact science-based research and innovative instructional practice using open resources and practices. Science demands a transparency that only open is positioned to provide.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
Madrid

9:00am

OER, Copyright, & Faculty: Are Academic Librarians Qualified to Support this Triptych?
As a profession, academic librarians are accustomed to collaborating with faculty and assisting them with locating quality content for their courses and their own scholarly endeavors. Librarians have also been leaders in the open access movement, advocating for faculty to publish in green or gold standard academic journals, which foster the open sharing of scholarly information. It is logical, therefore, that this group of professions is being called upon to assist in the navigation of these new(ish) open waters of locating, evaluating and creating OER. A significant challenge exists, however; how are librarians being educated and supported (or not) to successfully lead faculty through the creation and use of OER with respect to copyright?

Copyright infringement is a serious crime, and many academics have a distorted misconception that all educational use is fair use, when in fact, it is not. While academic librarians are taking on additional responsibilities to support and endorse its faculty as consumers and creators of OER, are they actually qualified to do so without formal copyright training and support? Many universities lack institutional copyright policies, which further leaves librarians in the dark with no clear guidelines other than their own interpretation of the law. Even for the few individuals of whom have had some level of training in copyright, navigating and applying the law when assisting faculty with OER can be a daunting, stressful, and labor-intensive task.

This presentation will touch on the limited literature, discuss real examples of librarians struggling to navigate copyright law when working with faculty, and offer some suggestions for academic librarians to consider and take back to their own institutions. Most importantly, I hope to spark dialogue amongst participants to raise awareness of this lack of support and training academic librarians receive from their institutions who are starting to heavily promote the use of OER.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsey Gumb

Lindsey Gumb

Instructional Technology Librarian, Roger Williams University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
Valencia

9:45am

Table 1 - Collaborating with Your Campus Bookstore
At the University of Arizona, we're frequently asked how the Libraries and campus-owned BookStores collaborate effectively on OER initiatives and other textbook cost-reduction projects. Cheryl Cuillier, the UA Libraries' OER Coordinator, and Cindy Hawk, Assistant Director of the UA BookStores, will share the secrets of our success, which can be replicated at other institutions. In this session, we'll cover data sharing, joint presentations to campus, our campus-wide OER Action Committee, how we've leveraged the Faculty Senate and Provost's involvement, how we notify students of free textbooks on the BookStores' website, and other strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Cuillier

Cheryl Cuillier

OER Coordinator, University of Arizona Libraries
I lead the Libraries' open educational resource (OER) initiatives.
CH

Cindy Hawk

Assistant Director Course Materials and Books, University of Arizona BookStores


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 2 - Stop, Collaborate, and Listen
This session will allow discussion and collaboration between the different, but necessary individuals needed to develop OER courses. Join us to identify tasks, set goals for a current or yet-to-be-defined project, and get contact information for fellow collaborators. The presenters will model how to work together to develop effective learning opportunities around open education resources. Participants will take advantage of the collective knowledge in the room, work together, find common goals, and share our resources and ideas with each other.



At the end of this session you will receive:

1. Contact information of at least one person (bring your business cards)

2. Project that you can begin to develop or continue

3. Clearly defined short-term tasks for that project

4. Clearly defined long-term goals for that project

5. A cookie



Agenda:

1. Presenters will briefly share their networking and collaboration story (2-3 min).

2. Break into groups based on subject types to find development projects in common (5 min)

3. Each team will make a minimum of two specific tasks and a maximum of two goals for the project. (5-10 min)

4. Take-away message(s) and follow-up activities. (2-3 min)

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Hauser

Christopher Hauser

Instructional Designer, Pima Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 4 - Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration between Fashion & World Language Programs in Support of Open Education
Building on research showing cross-disciplinary pedagogy can increase creativity and success rates, the Fashion and World Language programs decided to create a dynamic learning environment to improve student success and bolster their programs' institutional profiles. Both programs received funding to create program OERs, but they also developed cross-disciplinary materials. The session presenters will share the results of this collaboration, how it came together, and what they learned that could be applied elsewhere. There will also be time for questions during this interactive session. Participants in this session will learn about the challenges and rewards of cross-disciplinary programs and how these types of interactions can improve student engagement. They will also gain a better understanding of the benefits of cross-disciplinary relationships and how these are tools to develop a comprehensive learning environment. Finally, participants will become familiar with the process of creating cross-disciplinary programs with OER materials that support specific learning objectives. The session leaders will share how they successfully created OERs that provided students with a real-world application of the communication skills and cultural understanding needed to navigate an industry with supply chains that stretch around the world. These concrete examples helped students more deeply relate to and engage with the material. In addition to student engagement, crafting these cross-disciplinary materials also fostered a more collaborative faculty environment. The presenters will share this story, the challenges they encountered in developing these materials in a program with high numbers of adjunct faculty, and some of the things they learned along the way that can be used to customize OER materials to suit participants' program needs. The final point of discussion will be the impact of OERs on student retention and success rates, and lessons participants can draw upon.

Speakers
avatar for James Boldman

James Boldman

Assoc Prof/Prog Chair, Englis, Ivy Tech Community College
KR

Kari Richards

Foreign Language Program Faculty Chair, Lansing Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 5 - Achieving ADA Compliance in OER Math Content
In developing open source textbooks and resources for college algebra and trigonometry courses, the greatest challenge has been making these materials available to students with disabilities. Salt Lake Community College has solved this problem through frequent ongoing meetings of a Math Accessibility Working Group, comprised of math faculty and disability resource experts. The presenters will share the plan developed through this group, along with its implementation. Several features, such as text reading and alt-tagging, will be demonstrated. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions. All textbooks and resources developed through this collaboration are available and will be shared with interested attendees.

Speakers
CS

Clint Stoker

Coordinator III, Salt Lake Community College
RT

Ruth Trygstad

Full Time Faculty, Salt Lake Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 6 - Continuously improving content, assessments, and outcome alignment in OER courses
The goal of this presentation is to report the results of three separate but complimentary continuous course improvement analyses.



The first analysis used the RISE Framework, an OER learning analytics methodology, to identify resource pages in an OER course that merited additional evaluation. This type of analysis has previously been conducted at the course level, and we expand on that analysis by conducting the analysis at the student level.



The second analysis used exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (EFA/CFA) to identify how well the assessment items for each outcome in the course actually measure the same outcome. CFA was used first to find excellent, good, and poor fitting models. Then, we used EFA to assess the poor fitting models to determine if any changes should be made to improve the model fit for each outcome.



The third analysis used item response theory (IRT) within each outcome to compare item difficulties. Items that were too easy or too hard could be removed from the assessment so the assessment better measures student content mastery. These items could also be flagged for review to be improved for future course iterations.



These three analyses provide examples of the continuous course improvement work possible in OER courses. These analyses are particularly helpful in OER contexts because the content licenses allow changes to be made that would not be possible in copyrighted content found in traditional courses.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Bodily

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
My research focuses on xAPI and CALIPER enabled learning analytics dashboards. I am a co-founder of an open assessment company called Prendus with the purpose of increasing OER adoption.
RS

Ross Strader

Director of Learning Engineering, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 8 - The Vision of Open Embeddable Assessments
We'll discuss a little bit of the history of Open Embeddable Assessments and then discuss how it is currently being used by various organization. We'll share a little bit of information about the various Open Source versions of the project for those who want to dig into code. We'll then discuss the future of Open Embeddable Assessments and how we can still achieve the vision of sharing assessments as OER.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 9 - A model and platform to facilitate open assessments
There are a few repositories that have been created to provide increased access to open educational resources (OER) such as OpenStax (openstax.org), FlatworldKnowledge (flatworldknowledge.com), or LibreText (chem.libretexts.org). There are a few tools doing similar things in the assessment space, such as MyOpenMath (myopenmath.com), Oppia (oppia.org), H5P (h5p.org), or Open Assessments (openassessments.org). These tools provide platforms to facilitate the creation of resources. However, discoverability, reuse, moderation, and remixing of existing content could be improved in these tools. In addition, these tools do not address the issue of high stakes open assessment. For open assessment items, one of the challenges to overcome is student cheating. If assessments are open, students will have access to the questions in an online format (online quizzes or online homework assignments using open questions) which encourages student cheating.



Our proposed model and solution for open assessments is as follows:

1. There are two communities of openness, a public community and a teacher-only community.

a. The public community is open to everyone. This community contains formative assessment items that can be used anywhere as practice questions.

b. The teacher-only community is tightly restricted to teachers. This community contains summative assessment items that can be used in homework system problems, quizzes, or exams.

2. Interoperability standards are used

a. Quizzes can be imported using the quizzing and testing interoperability (QTI) standard

b. Quizzes can be taken from an LMS using learning tools interoperability (LTI)

c. Data is tracked using the Experience API (xAPI) data format

d. Practice questions can be embedded as an HTML5 object in textbooks, blog posts, webpages, etc.

3. Formative questions, quizzes, homework system sets, and exams can easily be shared, modified, and incorporated into existing courses within either community

Speakers
avatar for Robert Bodily

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
My research focuses on xAPI and CALIPER enabled learning analytics dashboards. I am a co-founder of an open assessment company called Prendus with the purpose of increasing OER adoption.
BM

Benjamin Mackley

Brigham Young University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 7 - Can I get data with that? Serving up open educational resources with a side of learning analytics by using xAPI
ADDIE, SAM, Gagne's Nine Events, Agile: No matter which model an instructional designer (ID) chooses to follow, one thing is for certain: quality instructional design thrives on data. Learning analytics not only provide the ID with data about if and how individuals are using their created learning event, but also whether or not the learning event is achieving the intended objective. E-Learning standards such as AICC and SCORM provide opportunities to share student usage data through a learning management system (LMS), so that the ID can adjust the learning event as needed and allow for the continuous improvement of effectiveness and best possible learning scenario for the student.



One major drawback of e-Learning standards is that the learning event must be housed in a location, such as an LMS, that requires a student login. When learning events are created and openly shared as open educational resources (OER), the content is typically no longer housed in an LMS, rendering these e-Learning standards useless. Google Analytics can usually provide some information, but not enough to fully gauge student participation in the learning event.



Enter xAPI, or the Experience API. xAPI, informally known as Tin Can, is an e-Learning standard that was created with the recognition that learning takes place everywhere and not just within an online classroom. xAPI allows the ID to collect specific data about how learners are using their learning event, whether it is hosted on a wiki, is a game within an app, or an interactive e-book, all while honoring the free and open principles of OER.



In this session, participants will become aware of the capabilities of the e-Learning standard of xAPI and walk away with tangible steps for investigating it for their own OER projects. Not familiar with coding? That's okay! Participants will explore a broad overview of xAPI's capabilities without an abundance of technical jargon.

Speakers
avatar for Cristina Colquhoun

Cristina Colquhoun

Instructional Designer, The Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University
Hi there! I am the Instructional Designer for the Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University. I am passionate about creating instructional resources, particularly eLearning, that honor the principles of OER. Need to know more about learning analytics and eLearning (particular... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 11 - New frontiers: How OER can reshape adult math education
Has adult education been left behind by OER? Adult learners stand to benefit more than most from low-cost resources; federal and state funding for adult education lags behind K-12 and Higher Ed by a factor of 10. The team behind Power in Numbers, the ongoing initiative from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education presents the findings from their research report on the demand and unmet needs of the adult market for OER. Focusing on mathematics, and teaming up with a series of experts across adult learning theory, mathematics, and OER, the team has explored why the gap exists and how we can bridge it.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Harper

Christopher Harper

Senior Analyst, Luminary Labs
Working with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education to enhance the teaching and learning of adult mathematics through OER. | Check out the Power in Numbers project: https://lincs.ed.gov/professional-development/federal-initiatives/p... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 12 - Open Support for Open Textbooks: From self-doubt to self-reliance
During the past two years, the B.C. Open Textbook Project has moved from an advocacy and building phase to that of operationalization. This evolution has required a re-examination of the support offered to faculty, staff, students and others using open textbooks.



This session will illustrate how B.C. Open Textbook Project incorporates a multi-tier system of self-serve resources, educational workshops and webinars, and helpdesk services to build and maintain an Open Support structure based on user's questions, feedback, and comments. Open Support, a dynamic and iterative system, is an example of how the tenets of "open" are applied to supporting, educating, and ultimately creating self-reliance for those adopting, adapting, and creating open textbooks and other open educational resources and practices.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design suppo... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 13 - Personalizing Instructions to Promote Student Success in an OER Math Course
MTH 151 is one of our high-enrollment courses. The students in this course are liberal arts students who need 3 math credits for their degree.Š—À Almost all of our online courses use a Š—“one size fits allŠ— approach. All of the students in the same course receive the same instruction. Many of the students tend to have an aversion to math and MTH 151 has become a road block for many liberal arts students. As we know, students have different background, different learning styles, and different interests. Research has shown interest-based instruction can help students conceptualize tasks and make connections between their prior knowledge and abstract concepts. To promote student success and academic achievement, we created interest-based instruction based on the open educational resources adopted in the Math course. In this session we will show you how we used the open educational resources in the course, how we identified four most popular interest areas among the students, and how we created personalized interactive learning modules for each interest areas. Attendees will walk away with the interactive lectures we created and can incorporate them into their own Math courses.

Speakers
SC

Shaoyu Chi

Instructional Designer, Northern Virginia Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 15 - You Oughta Know: Faculty Strategies for Growing OER
The presentation describes a pathway for faculty to adopt OER materials and redesign courses. Methods and tools for identifying and evaluating OER including a framework for adopting, modifying, and authoring materials to compliment instructional approaches and student audiences are shared. A summary of the institutional journey including policy development, governance structure, and financial support to foster OER growth and development are also provided.

Speakers
avatar for Vera Kennedy

Vera Kennedy

Sociology Instructor, West Hills College Lemoore
Sociology Instructor, WHCL and CSU Fresno | Sociology Editorial Board, Merlot | OER Co-chair, WHCL | | Experience with OER adoption, curriculum design, instruction, Canvas/Blackboard course shell creation, student evaluations, and peer review.



Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 16 - Learn First: OER, the College's Strategic Plan, and Community
Strategically, content and completion is a trap for both OER advocates and colleges institutionally. A primary focus on connections and community in strategies, however, can break the content trap and drive both college success and OER success. This session provides background concepts, analysis of typical higher ed strategic plans, current strategies for OER adoption, and introduces new ideas/suggestions for both OER adoption and institutional success.



David Wiley has written how OER is threatened strategically as publishers move to closed platform-based competition. At the same time increasing numbers of colleges face strategic threats themselves as evidenced by declining enrollments and pressures to raise completion/success rates. Despite widespread belief that MOOCs (the commercial variety) have failed, there is actually growing evidence that in many ways higher education is indeed being Š—“disruptedŠ— by other learning alternatives. While these two strategic battles, OER vs publishers and colleges' survival, may seem unrelated, they may have a common strategy that will help both OER and their institutions to Š—“winŠ—.



A new successful strategy for both requires moving beyond content, curriculum, and credential as our primary focus. I will argue that a Š—“Learn FirstŠ— strategy that builds on creating community and connections will be successful for both OER adoption and colleges. We need to focus on building OEC's, Open Educational Communities/Connections first. Quality content is still required, but it's a trap to make it primary.



This session pulls together my experiences:

Š—¢ As creator of the LCC Open Learning Lab

Š—¢ 7 years as leader of LCC's strategic planning process and faculty representative for accreditation

Š—¢ 25 years of experience as a business strategist/consultant prior to becoming professor

Š—¢ My understandings of the latest research such as Š—“The Content TrapŠ—



The session will involve significant discussion and sharing, not just presentati

Speakers
avatar for Robin DeRosa

Robin DeRosa

Interested in Open Pedagogy, interdisciplinarity, and learner-centered futures for public higher education. Find me on Twitter @actualham.
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Prof. Economics / Open Learning Lab, Lansing Community College
Open Learning, Domains projects, Community Colleges, Higher Ed strategy


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 17 - eLangdell Press: a model for sutainable OER in legal education
The cost of textbooks continues to rise and traditional textbooks are locked into proprietary systems. As an alternative, CALI(R) began producing no-cost eBooks for law students under the eLangdell Press imprint. Our titles are written by teaching law faculty, peer reviewed, and made available freely in multiple formats with a Creative Commons license.



The development of open educational resources with minimal staff is an exciting project. It allows interested faculty to create affordable and innovative course materials. This session will address CALI's model for creating legal casebooks. Topics discussed will include an overview of the 180 point checklist used for this project, author selection, selection of the Creative Commons' license, peer review, creating print and eBooks versions, including the use the Pressbooks platform for remixing materials, and the common tools that CALI uses. This is a model for creating OER textbooks that other organizations can replicate.



This presentation is a followup to 2013 and 2014 OpenEd sessions on eLangdell Press, http://cca.li/14A and http://cca.li/14C .

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Internet Development, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years ex... Read More →
avatar for Deb Quentel

Deb Quentel

Director of Curriculum Development & Assoc. Couns, CALI
Distance education | CALI content including lessons and elangdell casebooks | online learning | making content


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 18 - Using OER in Political Science
Many faculty have highly relevant experience in this dynamic field. OER offers the unique ability to provide up-to-date information to students and improve on the out-of-date information often provided by the textbook publishers.



I will discuss and demonstrate how faculty can build upon available OER materials and provide additional insight (E.g., Enlightenment philosophy's influence on the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and Technological and Regional Security Challenges) in their teaching materials. Since many publishers are now providing engagement, testing and presentation materials, I will also discuss the need for faculty committed to OER to develop (or identify) engagement, testing, and presentation materials to encourage widespread adoption of OER materials.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Tuite

Jim Tuite

Associate Instructor, Central Virginia Community College
Creating OER political science courses. | | Background | Prior to joining the faculty at Central Virginia Community College (CVCC), he was the National Security Advisor to the President pro Tempore of the U.S. Senate and the majority staff director of the U.S. Senate Natio... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Taking AIM at OER: Recruiting Campus Leadership in Supporting Affordable Learning
At San Francisco State, instructional materials adoptions are controlled by the faculty as an expression of academic freedom and intellectual property rights and practices. In our Affordable Instructional Materials and OER Adoption programs, we encourage appropriate adoption decisions, influencing faculty whenever and however we find opportunities. One important channel of influence we have recently found to be effective is through campus leadership, including the President, President's Cabinet (VPs), College Deans, and Student Leadership. In our initial three years, we have gathered and reported statistics about the impact of high-cost instructional materials on students and reported those to the campus in various ways. We have gathered data about how much our local efforts are saving students in instructional materials costs and we publish this success in multiple channels. We have analyzed student grades and retention to ensure that lower-cost materials were not contributing to declining student success, and in some cases may be direct contributors to improving performance in certain courses. We have publicly recognized faculty participation in our campus efforts to lower the cost of learning and we make their stories available for others to read and find encouragement. Our efforts have had an impact on faculty awareness, interest in considering OER, and ultimately making decisions to adopt low cost or free instructional materials, though our overall reach into the faculty has been limited. (Less than 100 faculty in three years have been actively involved in recognized projects.) Recently we launched a new effort to communicate more effectively to the leadership of administration, faculty, and student constituents in an attempt to leverage substantial initial success and raise the level of interest and discourse in all areas. This presentation explains our approach to campus leadership (President/Cabinet), academic leadership (Deans) and student leadership.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Beatty

Brian Beatty

AVP, Academic Affairs Operations, San Francisco State University
avatar for Heidi Fridriksson

Heidi Fridriksson

Instructional Designer, San Francisco State University
Heidi is an instructional designer with Academic Technology at San Francisco State University. She is also one of the OER coordinators working with faculty to drive OER adoption at SF State.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Terrace A - C

9:45am

OER Passport - Designing for Enhanced Faculty Investment in OER
Mountain Heights Academy is renewing its commitment to OER by involving all faculty members in a race to learn, create, and invite students to design OER with them. Teachers will be given an OER Passport at the beginning of the year with a list of tasks, resources, and courses to complete in whichever order they choose. Upon completion of each one, their OER Passport will be stamped and by the end of the school year each teacher will be even more of an OER expert than they were to begin with.

Speakers
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula. I'm passionate about digital learning, OER, students as instructional designers, and secondary ed. David Wiley g... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Barcelona

9:45am

Table 19 - Learning by Doing: Minimizing Resources Without Minimizing Outcomes through Strategic Design
This presentation will focus on how to address barriers to scaling while not compromising quality. AlgebraByExample will be presented as an example.



There are two primary barriers that can prevent scaling: cost and complexity. Open education resources minimize costs to use materials, but if OERs require considerable up-front investment in professional learning, or significant adaptation to fit within a teacher's practice, cost and complexity once again become a barrier. But simplifying materials to minimize other required resources can compromise quality and outcomes.



The Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) has addressed this challenge by designing for learning by doing. Knowledge required for using materials is kept to a minimum. But as teachers engage with the materials, they become attuned to the benefits of targeted evidence-based practices. This results in similar yet more authentic learning than one might expect from PD, and without the associated costs.



We present, for example, AlgebraByExample. Created through a SERP partnership with a set of districts and Temple University, this set of 42 strategically-designed algebra assignments were developed with cost and complexity in mind. AlgebraByExample assignments are designed to focus on common misconceptions and errors that students make through the incorporation of worked examples and question promptsäóîproven strategies in cognitive science research to improve learning. There's no associated training, and the assignments fit naturally a teacher's daily routine (every math teacher uses assignments), so it's no surprise that there's little hesitance to adopt the materials. Beyond impacts directly on students, teachers have reported that using AlgebraByExample has led to incorporating worked examples and student explanation into their general practiceäóîall without being explicitly trained, coached, or even told to do so.

Speakers
AH

Allie Huyghe

SERP Institute


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 20 - Scaling OER in K-12
Open Up Resources is working with school districts in the US with the goal of widespread adoption of comprehensive OER. We've partnered with Illustrative Mathematics to develop a middle school math curriculum and are working with EL Education to distribute their K-5 English Language Arts materials. The approach we've taken differs from some earlier OER efforts. This session will describe the approach and results to date.



In developing the materials, we focused on creating comprehensive curriculum for entire grade bands rather than creating smaller lessons and units. And, we've added in supports for English language learners as well.



The draft materials underwent a rigorous review process, and were pilot tested in school districts. In addition, we focused on creating an engaging design for the materials.



The materials are available in both print and digital with an eye towards meeting districts where they are in terms of technology.



Finally, unlike many OER projects, this project included dedicated sales and marketing staff to help these materials compete directly with commercial products.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 21 - Open Education in Developing Countries: Cases from Namibia and Uganda
The flow of research is often unidirectional, flowing from the global North to the global South (Kanwar, Kodhandaraman, & Umar, 2010) and to this, OER is no exception. It is argued that Š—“The African continent generates only 0.4% of global online content and this drops to 0.02% if South Africa is excludedŠ— (Gray, 2007, p. 35). The impression is that Afrika is largely absent in the OER discourse. Cases from South Africa are very common, however, for most of the other countries the questions is if OER movement non-existent in most of Afrika or if the activities occurring there are not being shared.

There are different entries through which one can enter the open education discourse. The three main gates are: 1) textbook affordability, 2) open pedagogy, 3) equity and 4) access. These conversations can be different by geographical areas, depending on the needs or priorities of the community. Little information exist on what gate(s) is used most in Afrikan countries. This is in large part because the voice from Afrika, either through Afrikan researchers themselves or researchers examining the phenomenon within Afrikan contexts are often missing. In this presentation we present two cases aimed at contributing Afrikan voices to the discourse on open education. Our presentation will be based on research in Namibia and Uganda, aimed at answering the following questions:

1. What does open education look like in Namibia and Uganda?

2. What are the values of openness from teachers in Namibia and Uganda?

3. What are the projects around open education taking place in Namibia and Uganda?



Our study uses a comparative and international education method (Asino, 2015), which is effective in conducting cross-cultural research. Through a combination of data from teachers and document analysis from the two countries, we aim to contribute a voice from Namibia and Uganda to the conference theme of Sharing, Gratitude, and Hope.

Speakers
TI

Tutaleni I. Asino

Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 22 - Teacher Professional Development using OER in Uganda
The difficulties of a village school in East Africa, which has no running water, few resources, and no internet access, add to existing impediments to teacher professional development. However, the innovations of OER and Content Access Point (CAP) provide opportunities for success in teacher professional development outcomes.



This presentation is a research-rich and human-captivating story of the partnership between people, technology, innovation, and educational passion. Pictures of dirt roads, bikes, and goats introduce the location of one of humanity's great struggles, educating children for a future with the limitations of today. The people behind the research have the real Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_value. The families and communities changed by the research have even greater value. This presentation will balance the discussion of research with the real application and outcomes of Open Education Resources (OER) on an educationally at-risk population in a context of extreme barriers to information, technology, and teacher professional development.



It is difficult to report the quantitative, non-parametric study using pre and post tests and analysis using the Mann-Whitney U without telling the stories of the faculty in an East African village school squatting in the Š—“bushŠ— accessing information from a passive satellite receiver or the story of the student running across a surrounded field to engage a pedagogically sound classroom experience. Therefore, we will tell both.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 23 - Bootstrapping an English as Second Language MOOC: What Works and What Doesn't
In the summer of 2016 I taught ENG 099: an English as a Second Language (ESL) Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) using Open Educational Resources for the third time. The first two times under 30 students registered and I taught live video lessons, but last year over 100 students from the Ivory Coast signed up. As a result I changed my approach to more of a self-serve model using Wikiversity as the course home. Each week I published Listening, Reading, Grammar, and/or Mechanics assignments on the course page with Writing and/or speaking homework to be submitted directly to me via e-mail. By the end of the six week course, seven students completed all the assignments and received certificates of completion. All three sequences of the course used only OER for the learning materials.



Following the course I collaboarted with another student at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) to analyze data from the course to understand what were the statistically signficant predictors of student success. Success here was measured as whether or not students finished all the assignments to complete the course. Using a multilevel Bayes Binary Probit Model we found that eagerness (defined as how quick they were to register), whether or not each week's lesson included specific vocabulary words to study, whether or not each week had optional work and the learning period (how much time passed since registartion opened [i.e., how long students had to study]) were the signifcant predictors of student success.



In my presentation I will detail how I created and administered the course as well as the results of the statistical analysis. It will be useful for:

* English as a Second Language teachers looking for examples of how to use OER in their classes,

* Educators hoping to run a MOOC on their own,

* Educators already running MOOCs wanting to learn what determines successful student completion, and

* Educators hoping to reach students in a developing country.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 24 - Degrees of social inclusion: Emerging insights from the ROER4D project
This presentation explores whether, why, and how Open Educational Practices and Resources (OEP&R) contribute to the social inclusion of underserved communities in the Global South by widening access to education, encouraging educational participation, and fostering empowerment of educators and learners. It does so by highlighting emerging insights from the Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) in the Global South project. ROER4D research focuses on OEP&R activities in three regions: South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. It consists of 18 sub-projects with more than 100 participating researchers and research associates in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. The central question posed is: For whom and under what circumstances can engagement with Open educational Practices and Resources promote social inclusion?



The presentation adopts and develops a conceptual framework advanced by Gidley et al. (2010) which suggests that there are Š—“degreesŠ— of social inclusion characterised by notions of access, participation, and empowerment. This means that inclusion should not be understood as a simple binary yes/no outcome. They argue: Š—“Social inclusion can be understood as pertaining to a nested schema regarding degrees of inclusion. The narrowest interpretation pertains to the neoliberal notion of social inclusion as access; a broader interpretation regards the social justice idea of social inclusion as participation; whilst the widest interpretation involves the human potential lens of social inclusion as empowermentŠ— (Gidley et al., 2010). The framework is used to examine the types of social inclusion emergent in a selection of ROER4D studies and concludes that degrees of social inclusion are discernable in the OEP&R adopted by educators, and to a lesser extent by learners.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Research on OER in the Global South (ROER4D) project | Open Research | Open Data
avatar for Henry Trotter

Henry Trotter

Editorial Manager & Researcher, Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)
I'm a researcher and editorial manager for the ROER4D project, based at the University of Cape Town. I work on OER in the Global South.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 25 - Sharing Open Educational Resources in Ethiopia
Ethiopia is one of the world's oldest and poorest countries. Yet the economy has been booming over the past decade, with annual economic growth around 10% in the past two years. With its goal to become a middle-income country, the Ethiopian government is investing heavily in higher education; from 20,000 students on two campuses in the late 1990s to more than 780,000 students on dozens of campuses today, higher education in Ethiopia is growing at a dizzying rate. With this growth, however, comes significant challenges, including accessing appropriate learning materials. The academic publishing industry in Ethiopia is small, and, with English the language of instruction in Ethiopian higher education, most textbooks are sourced from outside the country, from India, the UK, and the US, among other countries. However, due to a bureaucratic ordering process and prohibitive international shipping, academic libraries in Ethiopia routinely expect to wait two to three years for books to arrive. In this context, open educational resources seem an ideal solution. Yet, in Ethiopia as in many other less economically developed countries, infrastructure can be a significant barrier; in particular, internet bandwidth is limited and power outages common. The presenter spent the 2016-17 academic year in Ethiopia as a Fulbright Scholar, where she incorporated OER into her teaching, gave lectures to Ethiopian faculty on OER, and conducted research on the feasibility of OER in Ethiopian higher education. In her research, she asked this question: Are infrastructure limitations significant enough to off-set the potential usefulness of OER for higher education in East Africa? This presentation shares the results of that researchŠ—”including some surprising concerns of facultyŠ—”as well as the challenges and successes of implementing OER in Ethiopia, with implications for East Africa as well as developing countries around the world.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Petit

Joan Petit

Communications & Outreach Librarian, Portland State University
I served as a Fulbright Scholar at Jimma University in Ethiopia during the 2016-17 academic year. My presentation focuses on my research there on the feasibility of open textbooks in Ethiopian higher education.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Table 26 - OER Adoption in India
OERs have emerged as one of the key teaching-learning practices that have enhanced the quality of education. In 2008, Indian Government's National Knowledge Commission called for a Š—“National e-content and curriculum initiativeŠ— to enhance and promote OER creation and adoption. The National Mission on Education using ICT also stressed on creation of OER under the scheme. Since then India has undertaken several major projects through national level repositories that create content at every level of education, from primary to higher education. Despite the fact that the OER movement aimsξfor reducing time and cost of technology-enhanced learning environment, its accomplishment and sustainability rely on large-scale participation by educators. This demands consciousness and awareness about the concept of OER among educators and policy adoption of OER by institutions. Our earlier studies have shown that though several faculty of various Indian Universities possess a positive attitude towards OER and are willing to create, adapt and share their content; a larger percentage of educators and academicians often do not believe in sharing their knowledge. Various reasons, such as substantial lack of technical skills, minimal understanding of copyright and licensing, and lack of institutional policy have been recognised. We believe that with more ICT skills and knowledge of OER, the localised needs of academicians can be met which could assist in the promotion of OER. The present paper discusses these reasons along with the current status of OER in India. Various aspects, such as adoption of OER in India, the extent of awareness among educators about OER, various barriers and constraints faced by content creators in creating/adopting OER, the status of strategies adopted at the institutional level, will be discussed. We will also discuss means that could lead to successful implementation of OER and making OER mainstream in Indian higher education.

Speakers
avatar for SAVITHRI SINGH

SAVITHRI SINGH

Principal (Head of organization), Acharya Narendra Dev College (University of Delhi)
Creative Commons Affiliate from India. Have played an advocacy role. Passionate about OER. | | Am also passionate about bird-watching and taking bird photographs - aim to submit more of my images for the commons.


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Royal Ballroom

9:45am

Toward an Integrated Open Textbook and Free Software Platform in Science Education
Open source software can be used to greatly enhance the learning experience of students in STEM courses. The challenge of its effective deployment and its course integration are substantial, however, even with an open textbook. Integrating a science textbook within a controlled open source software environment provides students and educators the advantage of access to a common set of mathematics, science, simulation, and multimedia software, as well as software development and teaching tools. Avenues for this integration range from the production of custom open source software distributions to the configuration of dedicated inexpensive computers to accompany textbooks. The former approach includes the production of a live free software distribution with the desired software, teaching resources and open textbooks already integrated to run on existing student and institutional hardware. The open source tools available to facilitate this creation along with the limitations of this approach are explored. An alternate approach, based on the advent of inexpensive system on a chip (SOC) computers having sufficient computational power at low cost puts distribution of an integrated open textbook/software educational platform within reach for students and institutions. This modality of textbook and software distribution presents its own advantages and challenges that are considered.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Petry

Robert Petry

Instructor, Campion College at the University of Regina



Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Madrid

9:45am

The 'Opening' of the Library
Critical information literacy, the metaliteracy movement, and trends toward curating open access content all point to the ways in which The Library is "opening." Librarians are moving beyond the building, beyond the corporate-dominated information industrial complex, and beyond teaching to the CRAP test. Despite this shift, librarians often receive requests for instruction sessions and materials that reflect old, outdated approaches to what librarians should do and what libraries should "own." Furthermore, the focus on teaching students how to find "academic articles," while relevant for disciplinary research, ignores the economic and social inequalities outside the ivory tower. In this session, learn about the paradigm shift in librarianship and information studies and what it means for how you work with librarians at your institution, and teach your students.

Speakers
avatar for Irene McGarrity

Irene McGarrity

Assistant Professor/Faculty Librarian, Keene State College


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:10am
Valencia

9:45am

Closing the Digital Educational Divide: Using Low Cost Technology to Share OER with Libraries, Schools, and Public Health Facilities in Africa and the World
Nearly 5 billion people around the world lack basic internet access, putting them at a severe disadvantage in terms of economic, educational, health, and social opportunity. While a number of providers are attempting to address this global digital divide, our panel will explore a collaborative effort to bridge this divide using several low-cost technological solutions, offering enormous potential for reaching the developing world. We will discuss our experiences using Outernet, Keepod, and RACHEL (Remote Area Community Hotspot for Education & Learning). These technologies allow our team to distribute open content to information-poor communities in a cost-effective and efficient way.



In partnership with Outernet, a global broadcast data startup, an IT nonprofit in Malawi called ShiftIT, Salesforce/Heroku, and World Possible, University of Massachusetts Amherst librarians, students, and faculty are transmitting sought-after, openly licensed information to libraries and schools that have no, or very limited, internet access. Under the leadership of the UMass Amherst Libraries a student World Librarians group is providing residents of the developing nation of Malawi with access to information that would otherwise be out of reach. Sites in Malawi request information they want via Twitter and tag the UMass Amherst account. The advantage of Twitter being the reduced cost to cellular data plans. Tweets are then organized and managed within the Salesforce & Heroku Apps, allowing searchers to easily fulfill requests. The preliminary success of this pilot suggests that there is potential for it to be replicated on a much larger scale as well as expanded into other fields such as public health.

Speakers
JS

Jeremy Schwartz

Executive Director, World Possible
avatar for Jeremy Smith

Jeremy Smith

Digital Projects Manager, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Manage the Open Education program at UMass Amherst. Former archivist, resident of Holyoke, MA, member of the Flywheel Arts Collective in Easthampton, MA a volunteer-run community arts space.



Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:40am
Grenada

9:45am

Creating No-textbook Courses in Information Technology
One of the largest expenses for university students is the cost of textbooks. This is particularly true in the STEM areas. Data shows that course textbooks cost more and more every year. Textbook costs have risen 812% since 1978 and 73% since 2006 – which is four times the rate of inflation. The College Board recommends that students budget at least $1200 per year for textbook costs. Over 1/3 of students use their financial aid for textbook costs. The average computer science textbook costs $180. USA Today published that "out of more than 2,000 students surveyed, 65% said they did not buy a textbook at some point during college because of the cost. Of those, 94% said this choice made them concerned about their grade."

http://college.usatoday.com/2014/01/29/cost-of-textbooks-affects-student-grades-study-shows/

In order to help alleviate some of these textbook costs, the State of Georgia has been offering to faculty Affordable Learning Grants across all majors. Several faculty in the Information Technology Department of Kennesaw State University were awarded an ALG grant during the 2015-16 academic year for redevelopment of four database courses using no textbook. In 2016-17 several IT faculty members were again awarded an ALG grant for redevelopment of information security courses and an ethics course. One of the positive things for faculty developing a no textbook course is that once the course has been developed, any changes can be done incrementally to keep it up-to-date. For a course that gets a new textbook, the faculty member has to make extensive changes to the course, and repeats that process with every new textbook. The results from student surveys concerning the database no-textbook courses were very positive.

Speakers
BR

Becky Rutherfoord

Department Chair Information Technology, Kennesaw State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:40am
Terrace D - F

10:15am

Table 1 - Collaborating with Your Campus Bookstore
At the University of Arizona, we're frequently asked how the Libraries and campus-owned BookStores collaborate effectively on OER initiatives and other textbook cost-reduction projects. Cheryl Cuillier, the UA Libraries' OER Coordinator, and Cindy Hawk, Assistant Director of the UA BookStores, will share the secrets of our success, which can be replicated at other institutions. In this session, we'll cover data sharing, joint presentations to campus, our campus-wide OER Action Committee, how we've leveraged the Faculty Senate and Provost's involvement, how we notify students of free textbooks on the BookStores' website, and other strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Cuillier

Cheryl Cuillier

OER Coordinator, University of Arizona Libraries
I lead the Libraries' open educational resource (OER) initiatives.
CH

Cindy Hawk

Assistant Director Course Materials and Books, University of Arizona BookStores


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 2 - Stop, Collaborate, and Listen
This session will allow discussion and collaboration between the different, but necessary individuals needed to develop OER courses. Join us to identify tasks, set goals for a current or yet-to-be-defined project, and get contact information for fellow collaborators. The presenters will model how to work together to develop effective learning opportunities around open education resources. Participants will take advantage of the collective knowledge in the room, work together, find common goals, and share our resources and ideas with each other.



At the end of this session you will receive:

1. Contact information of at least one person (bring your business cards)

2. Project that you can begin to develop or continue

3. Clearly defined short-term tasks for that project

4. Clearly defined long-term goals for that project

5. A cookie



Agenda:

1. Presenters will briefly share their networking and collaboration story (2-3 min).

2. Break into groups based on subject types to find development projects in common (5 min)

3. Each team will make a minimum of two specific tasks and a maximum of two goals for the project. (5-10 min)

4. Take-away message(s) and follow-up activities. (2-3 min)

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Hauser

Christopher Hauser

Instructional Designer, Pima Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 4 - Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration between Fashion & World Language Programs in Support of Open Education
Building on research showing cross-disciplinary pedagogy can increase creativity and success rates, the Fashion and World Language programs decided to create a dynamic learning environment to improve student success and bolster their programs' institutional profiles. Both programs received funding to create program OERs, but they also developed cross-disciplinary materials. The session presenters will share the results of this collaboration, how it came together, and what they learned that could be applied elsewhere. There will also be time for questions during this interactive session. Participants in this session will learn about the challenges and rewards of cross-disciplinary programs and how these types of interactions can improve student engagement. They will also gain a better understanding of the benefits of cross-disciplinary relationships and how these are tools to develop a comprehensive learning environment. Finally, participants will become familiar with the process of creating cross-disciplinary programs with OER materials that support specific learning objectives. The session leaders will share how they successfully created OERs that provided students with a real-world application of the communication skills and cultural understanding needed to navigate an industry with supply chains that stretch around the world. These concrete examples helped students more deeply relate to and engage with the material. In addition to student engagement, crafting these cross-disciplinary materials also fostered a more collaborative faculty environment. The presenters will share this story, the challenges they encountered in developing these materials in a program with high numbers of adjunct faculty, and some of the things they learned along the way that can be used to customize OER materials to suit participants' program needs. The final point of discussion will be the impact of OERs on student retention and success rates, and lessons participants can draw upon.

Speakers
avatar for James Boldman

James Boldman

Assoc Prof/Prog Chair, Englis, Ivy Tech Community College
KR

Kari Richards

Foreign Language Program Faculty Chair, Lansing Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 5 - Achieving ADA Compliance in OER Math Content
In developing open source textbooks and resources for college algebra and trigonometry courses, the greatest challenge has been making these materials available to students with disabilities. Salt Lake Community College has solved this problem through frequent ongoing meetings of a Math Accessibility Working Group, comprised of math faculty and disability resource experts. The presenters will share the plan developed through this group, along with its implementation. Several features, such as text reading and alt-tagging, will be demonstrated. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions. All textbooks and resources developed through this collaboration are available and will be shared with interested attendees.

Speakers
CS

Clint Stoker

Coordinator III, Salt Lake Community College
RT

Ruth Trygstad

Full Time Faculty, Salt Lake Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 6 - Continuously improving content, assessments, and outcome alignment in OER courses
The goal of this presentation is to report the results of three separate but complimentary continuous course improvement analyses.



The first analysis used the RISE Framework, an OER learning analytics methodology, to identify resource pages in an OER course that merited additional evaluation. This type of analysis has previously been conducted at the course level, and we expand on that analysis by conducting the analysis at the student level.



The second analysis used exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (EFA/CFA) to identify how well the assessment items for each outcome in the course actually measure the same outcome. CFA was used first to find excellent, good, and poor fitting models. Then, we used EFA to assess the poor fitting models to determine if any changes should be made to improve the model fit for each outcome.



The third analysis used item response theory (IRT) within each outcome to compare item difficulties. Items that were too easy or too hard could be removed from the assessment so the assessment better measures student content mastery. These items could also be flagged for review to be improved for future course iterations.



These three analyses provide examples of the continuous course improvement work possible in OER courses. These analyses are particularly helpful in OER contexts because the content licenses allow changes to be made that would not be possible in copyrighted content found in traditional courses.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Bodily

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
My research focuses on xAPI and CALIPER enabled learning analytics dashboards. I am a co-founder of an open assessment company called Prendus with the purpose of increasing OER adoption.
RS

Ross Strader

Director of Learning Engineering, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 8 - The Vision of Open Embeddable Assessments
We'll discuss a little bit of the history of Open Embeddable Assessments and then discuss how it is currently being used by various organization. We'll share a little bit of information about the various Open Source versions of the project for those who want to dig into code. We'll then discuss the future of Open Embeddable Assessments and how we can still achieve the vision of sharing assessments as OER.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 9 - A model and platform to facilitate open assessments
There are a few repositories that have been created to provide increased access to open educational resources (OER) such as OpenStax (openstax.org), FlatworldKnowledge (flatworldknowledge.com), or LibreText (chem.libretexts.org). There are a few tools doing similar things in the assessment space, such as MyOpenMath (myopenmath.com), Oppia (oppia.org), H5P (h5p.org), or Open Assessments (openassessments.org). These tools provide platforms to facilitate the creation of resources. However, discoverability, reuse, moderation, and remixing of existing content could be improved in these tools. In addition, these tools do not address the issue of high stakes open assessment. For open assessment items, one of the challenges to overcome is student cheating. If assessments are open, students will have access to the questions in an online format (online quizzes or online homework assignments using open questions) which encourages student cheating.



Our proposed model and solution for open assessments is as follows:

1. There are two communities of openness, a public community and a teacher-only community.

a. The public community is open to everyone. This community contains formative assessment items that can be used anywhere as practice questions.

b. The teacher-only community is tightly restricted to teachers. This community contains summative assessment items that can be used in homework system problems, quizzes, or exams.

2. Interoperability standards are used

a. Quizzes can be imported using the quizzing and testing interoperability (QTI) standard

b. Quizzes can be taken from an LMS using learning tools interoperability (LTI)

c. Data is tracked using the Experience API (xAPI) data format

d. Practice questions can be embedded as an HTML5 object in textbooks, blog posts, webpages, etc.

3. Formative questions, quizzes, homework system sets, and exams can easily be shared, modified, and incorporated into existing courses within either community

Speakers
avatar for Robert Bodily

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
My research focuses on xAPI and CALIPER enabled learning analytics dashboards. I am a co-founder of an open assessment company called Prendus with the purpose of increasing OER adoption.
BM

Benjamin Mackley

Brigham Young University


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 7 - Can I get data with that? Serving up open educational resources with a side of learning analytics by using xAPI
ADDIE, SAM, Gagne's Nine Events, Agile: No matter which model an instructional designer (ID) chooses to follow, one thing is for certain: quality instructional design thrives on data. Learning analytics not only provide the ID with data about if and how individuals are using their created learning event, but also whether or not the learning event is achieving the intended objective. E-Learning standards such as AICC and SCORM provide opportunities to share student usage data through a learning management system (LMS), so that the ID can adjust the learning event as needed and allow for the continuous improvement of effectiveness and best possible learning scenario for the student.



One major drawback of e-Learning standards is that the learning event must be housed in a location, such as an LMS, that requires a student login. When learning events are created and openly shared as open educational resources (OER), the content is typically no longer housed in an LMS, rendering these e-Learning standards useless. Google Analytics can usually provide some information, but not enough to fully gauge student participation in the learning event.



Enter xAPI, or the Experience API. xAPI, informally known as Tin Can, is an e-Learning standard that was created with the recognition that learning takes place everywhere and not just within an online classroom. xAPI allows the ID to collect specific data about how learners are using their learning event, whether it is hosted on a wiki, is a game within an app, or an interactive e-book, all while honoring the free and open principles of OER.



In this session, participants will become aware of the capabilities of the e-Learning standard of xAPI and walk away with tangible steps for investigating it for their own OER projects. Not familiar with coding? That's okay! Participants will explore a broad overview of xAPI's capabilities without an abundance of technical jargon.

Speakers
avatar for Cristina Colquhoun

Cristina Colquhoun

Instructional Designer, The Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University
Hi there! I am the Instructional Designer for the Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University. I am passionate about creating instructional resources, particularly eLearning, that honor the principles of OER. Need to know more about learning analytics and eLearning (particular... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 11 - New frontiers: How OER can reshape adult math education
Has adult education been left behind by OER? Adult learners stand to benefit more than most from low-cost resources; federal and state funding for adult education lags behind K-12 and Higher Ed by a factor of 10. The team behind Power in Numbers, the ongoing initiative from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education presents the findings from their research report on the demand and unmet needs of the adult market for OER. Focusing on mathematics, and teaming up with a series of experts across adult learning theory, mathematics, and OER, the team has explored why the gap exists and how we can bridge it.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Harper

Christopher Harper

Senior Analyst, Luminary Labs
Working with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education to enhance the teaching and learning of adult mathematics through OER. | Check out the Power in Numbers project: https://lincs.ed.gov/professional-development/federal-initiatives/p... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 12 - Open Support for Open Textbooks: From self-doubt to self-reliance
During the past two years, the B.C. Open Textbook Project has moved from an advocacy and building phase to that of operationalization. This evolution has required a re-examination of the support offered to faculty, staff, students and others using open textbooks.



This session will illustrate how B.C. Open Textbook Project incorporates a multi-tier system of self-serve resources, educational workshops and webinars, and helpdesk services to build and maintain an Open Support structure based on user's questions, feedback, and comments. Open Support, a dynamic and iterative system, is an example of how the tenets of "open" are applied to supporting, educating, and ultimately creating self-reliance for those adopting, adapting, and creating open textbooks and other open educational resources and practices.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design suppo... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 13 - Personalizing Instructions to Promote Student Success in an OER Math Course
MTH 151 is one of our high-enrollment courses. The students in this course are liberal arts students who need 3 math credits for their degree.Š—À Almost all of our online courses use a Š—“one size fits allŠ— approach. All of the students in the same course receive the same instruction. Many of the students tend to have an aversion to math and MTH 151 has become a road block for many liberal arts students. As we know, students have different background, different learning styles, and different interests. Research has shown interest-based instruction can help students conceptualize tasks and make connections between their prior knowledge and abstract concepts. To promote student success and academic achievement, we created interest-based instruction based on the open educational resources adopted in the Math course. In this session we will show you how we used the open educational resources in the course, how we identified four most popular interest areas among the students, and how we created personalized interactive learning modules for each interest areas. Attendees will walk away with the interactive lectures we created and can incorporate them into their own Math courses.

Speakers
SC

Shaoyu Chi

Instructional Designer, Northern Virginia Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 15 - You Oughta Know: Faculty Strategies for Growing OER
The presentation describes a pathway for faculty to adopt OER materials and redesign courses. Methods and tools for identifying and evaluating OER including a framework for adopting, modifying, and authoring materials to compliment instructional approaches and student audiences are shared. A summary of the institutional journey including policy development, governance structure, and financial support to foster OER growth and development are also provided.

Speakers
avatar for Vera Kennedy

Vera Kennedy

Sociology Instructor, West Hills College Lemoore
Sociology Instructor, WHCL and CSU Fresno | Sociology Editorial Board, Merlot | OER Co-chair, WHCL | | Experience with OER adoption, curriculum design, instruction, Canvas/Blackboard course shell creation, student evaluations, and peer review.



Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 16 - Learn First: OER, the College's Strategic Plan, and Community
Strategically, content and completion is a trap for both OER advocates and colleges institutionally. A primary focus on connections and community in strategies, however, can break the content trap and drive both college success and OER success. This session provides background concepts, analysis of typical higher ed strategic plans, current strategies for OER adoption, and introduces new ideas/suggestions for both OER adoption and institutional success.



David Wiley has written how OER is threatened strategically as publishers move to closed platform-based competition. At the same time increasing numbers of colleges face strategic threats themselves as evidenced by declining enrollments and pressures to raise completion/success rates. Despite widespread belief that MOOCs (the commercial variety) have failed, there is actually growing evidence that in many ways higher education is indeed being Š—“disruptedŠ— by other learning alternatives. While these two strategic battles, OER vs publishers and colleges' survival, may seem unrelated, they may have a common strategy that will help both OER and their institutions to Š—“winŠ—.



A new successful strategy for both requires moving beyond content, curriculum, and credential as our primary focus. I will argue that a Š—“Learn FirstŠ— strategy that builds on creating community and connections will be successful for both OER adoption and colleges. We need to focus on building OEC's, Open Educational Communities/Connections first. Quality content is still required, but it's a trap to make it primary.



This session pulls together my experiences:

Š—¢ As creator of the LCC Open Learning Lab

Š—¢ 7 years as leader of LCC's strategic planning process and faculty representative for accreditation

Š—¢ 25 years of experience as a business strategist/consultant prior to becoming professor

Š—¢ My understandings of the latest research such as Š—“The Content TrapŠ—



The session will involve significant discussion and sharing, not just presentati

Speakers
avatar for Robin DeRosa

Robin DeRosa

Interested in Open Pedagogy, interdisciplinarity, and learner-centered futures for public higher education. Find me on Twitter @actualham.
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Prof. Economics / Open Learning Lab, Lansing Community College
Open Learning, Domains projects, Community Colleges, Higher Ed strategy


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 17 - eLangdell Press: a model for sutainable OER in legal education
The cost of textbooks continues to rise and traditional textbooks are locked into proprietary systems. As an alternative, CALI(R) began producing no-cost eBooks for law students under the eLangdell Press imprint. Our titles are written by teaching law faculty, peer reviewed, and made available freely in multiple formats with a Creative Commons license.



The development of open educational resources with minimal staff is an exciting project. It allows interested faculty to create affordable and innovative course materials. This session will address CALI's model for creating legal casebooks. Topics discussed will include an overview of the 180 point checklist used for this project, author selection, selection of the Creative Commons' license, peer review, creating print and eBooks versions, including the use the Pressbooks platform for remixing materials, and the common tools that CALI uses. This is a model for creating OER textbooks that other organizations can replicate.



This presentation is a followup to 2013 and 2014 OpenEd sessions on eLangdell Press, http://cca.li/14A and http://cca.li/14C .

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Internet Development, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years ex... Read More →
avatar for Deb Quentel

Deb Quentel

Director of Curriculum Development & Assoc. Couns, CALI
Distance education | CALI content including lessons and elangdell casebooks | online learning | making content


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 18 - Using OER in Political Science
Many faculty have highly relevant experience in this dynamic field. OER offers the unique ability to provide up-to-date information to students and improve on the out-of-date information often provided by the textbook publishers.



I will discuss and demonstrate how faculty can build upon available OER materials and provide additional insight (E.g., Enlightenment philosophy's influence on the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and Technological and Regional Security Challenges) in their teaching materials. Since many publishers are now providing engagement, testing and presentation materials, I will also discuss the need for faculty committed to OER to develop (or identify) engagement, testing, and presentation materials to encourage widespread adoption of OER materials.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Tuite

Jim Tuite

Associate Instructor, Central Virginia Community College
Creating OER political science courses. | | Background | Prior to joining the faculty at Central Virginia Community College (CVCC), he was the National Security Advisor to the President pro Tempore of the U.S. Senate and the majority staff director of the U.S. Senate Natio... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Tackling the Transition to Open Education: Increasing Z-degrees within Guided Pathways
This presentation focuses on the collaborative efforts and support necessary to develop sustainable Z-degrees through Guided Pathways. Lansing Community College (LCC) is a Guided Pathways school and has created clear Program of Study (degree) maps that define the courses students take and the order in which they are taken with the goal of increasing timely completion of degrees/certificates. Another main initiative at LCC is Operation 100%, in which the goal is nothing less than 100% completion for the students in degree, certificate, and/or transfer pathways. Both of these initiatives have been strengthened through the adoption of Open materials because research shows that students who are in OER-based classes are able to complete more coursework. The presenters therefore believe by creating Z-degrees within Guided Pathways, LCC is able to better support its students. This session will discuss the implementation of these programs so that participants will gain an understanding of the early stages of developing sustainable Z-degrees within Guided Pathways that could be implemented at their own institutions to increase student success rates. Additional discussion will show how to combine these degrees with available open educational materials to maximize student success. The presenters will share their experiences in managing the collaboration between the Guided Pathways Coordinator and world language faculty to develop sustainable Z-degrees within Guided Pathways. They will also discuss the challenges faced in advocating for these programs and those associated with the beginning stages of creating Z-degrees; strategies to overcome these difficulties will be addressed. The presenters of this session envision the Guided Pathway Z-degrees will rapidly take off at their institution and make LCC a national leader in this area. This session is going to be both educational and interactive and will allow participants to jump in and ask questions when necessary.

Speakers
CC

Christine Conner

Guided Pathways Coordinator, Lansing Community College
KR

Kari Richards

Foreign Language Program Faculty Chair, Lansing Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Terrace A - C

10:15am

OER in K-12: Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned (and Learning)
In 2012, Washington passed legislation directing the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to create a library of OER and promote awareness and adoption. Over the past five years, the K-12 OER Project has evolved in response to stakeholder needs, experiencing many successes and challenges to share with the OER community.

Successful strategies

- Evaluating OER quality led to an OER Library reviewed using the same procedure as traditional materials and generated a cadre of teacher OER advocates.

- Grants to groups implementing OER provided legitimacy to the work and encouraged districts to look closely at OER options as viable choices.

- On the policy front, work with the Washington State School Directors' Association created model Instructional Material Adoption policy that recognized OER as an option for core instructional material consideration. In addition, OSPI adopted an agency wide Copyright and Open Licensing Policy that acts as a model for school districts.

- Joining the #GoOpen initiative provided access to a large community of OER champions across the US willing to share critical expertise and resources

Challenges

- Many school boards struggle with the adoption of adaptable resources that could impact fidelity of implementation district wide.

- Addressing misconceptions about what OER is and is not remains an issue.

- Encouraging a culture of document sharing beyond the district LMS can be difficult -- OER shines light on copyright issues that have been ignored when resources are kept in-house

Washington has advocated district consideration of OER. This message has been amplified by a similar push from the U.S. Department of Education. Having a dedicated program at the state level is critical to provide ongoing guidance about the inclusion of OER as an important part of the instructional materials ecosystem. However, to scale the work partners and collaborators are needed at the district, state, and national level.

Speakers
avatar for Layla Bonnot

Layla Bonnot

Senior Program Associate, CCSSO
I lead the OER work at CCSSO. We serve state superintendents of K-12 education in the U.S. Talk to me about #GoOpen, the Learning Registry, K-12 OER education, and Federal and state policies.
avatar for Meredith Jacob

Meredith Jacob

Public Lead, Creative Commons USA
I work at American University Washington College of Law - at the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property - pijip.org. We're also the home of Creative Commons United States - the US Creative Commons Affiliate. I'm interested in public interest intellectual prope... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

Open Educational Resources Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She... Read More →



Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Barcelona

10:15am

Table 19 - Learning by Doing: Minimizing Resources Without Minimizing Outcomes through Strategic Design
This presentation will focus on how to address barriers to scaling while not compromising quality. AlgebraByExample will be presented as an example.



There are two primary barriers that can prevent scaling: cost and complexity. Open education resources minimize costs to use materials, but if OERs require considerable up-front investment in professional learning, or significant adaptation to fit within a teacher's practice, cost and complexity once again become a barrier. But simplifying materials to minimize other required resources can compromise quality and outcomes.



The Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) has addressed this challenge by designing for learning by doing. Knowledge required for using materials is kept to a minimum. But as teachers engage with the materials, they become attuned to the benefits of targeted evidence-based practices. This results in similar yet more authentic learning than one might expect from PD, and without the associated costs.



We present, for example, AlgebraByExample. Created through a SERP partnership with a set of districts and Temple University, this set of 42 strategically-designed algebra assignments were developed with cost and complexity in mind. AlgebraByExample assignments are designed to focus on common misconceptions and errors that students make through the incorporation of worked examples and question promptsäóîproven strategies in cognitive science research to improve learning. There's no associated training, and the assignments fit naturally a teacher's daily routine (every math teacher uses assignments), so it's no surprise that there's little hesitance to adopt the materials. Beyond impacts directly on students, teachers have reported that using AlgebraByExample has led to incorporating worked examples and student explanation into their general practiceäóîall without being explicitly trained, coached, or even told to do so.

Speakers
AH

Allie Huyghe

SERP Institute


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 20 - Scaling OER in K-12
Open Up Resources is working with school districts in the US with the goal of widespread adoption of comprehensive OER. We've partnered with Illustrative Mathematics to develop a middle school math curriculum and are working with EL Education to distribute their K-5 English Language Arts materials. The approach we've taken differs from some earlier OER efforts. This session will describe the approach and results to date.



In developing the materials, we focused on creating comprehensive curriculum for entire grade bands rather than creating smaller lessons and units. And, we've added in supports for English language learners as well.



The draft materials underwent a rigorous review process, and were pilot tested in school districts. In addition, we focused on creating an engaging design for the materials.



The materials are available in both print and digital with an eye towards meeting districts where they are in terms of technology.



Finally, unlike many OER projects, this project included dedicated sales and marketing staff to help these materials compete directly with commercial products.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 21 - Open Education in Developing Countries: Cases from Namibia and Uganda
The flow of research is often unidirectional, flowing from the global North to the global South (Kanwar, Kodhandaraman, & Umar, 2010) and to this, OER is no exception. It is argued that Š—“The African continent generates only 0.4% of global online content and this drops to 0.02% if South Africa is excludedŠ— (Gray, 2007, p. 35). The impression is that Afrika is largely absent in the OER discourse. Cases from South Africa are very common, however, for most of the other countries the questions is if OER movement non-existent in most of Afrika or if the activities occurring there are not being shared.

There are different entries through which one can enter the open education discourse. The three main gates are: 1) textbook affordability, 2) open pedagogy, 3) equity and 4) access. These conversations can be different by geographical areas, depending on the needs or priorities of the community. Little information exist on what gate(s) is used most in Afrikan countries. This is in large part because the voice from Afrika, either through Afrikan researchers themselves or researchers examining the phenomenon within Afrikan contexts are often missing. In this presentation we present two cases aimed at contributing Afrikan voices to the discourse on open education. Our presentation will be based on research in Namibia and Uganda, aimed at answering the following questions:

1. What does open education look like in Namibia and Uganda?

2. What are the values of openness from teachers in Namibia and Uganda?

3. What are the projects around open education taking place in Namibia and Uganda?



Our study uses a comparative and international education method (Asino, 2015), which is effective in conducting cross-cultural research. Through a combination of data from teachers and document analysis from the two countries, we aim to contribute a voice from Namibia and Uganda to the conference theme of Sharing, Gratitude, and Hope.

Speakers
TI

Tutaleni I. Asino

Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 22 - Teacher Professional Development using OER in Uganda
The difficulties of a village school in East Africa, which has no running water, few resources, and no internet access, add to existing impediments to teacher professional development. However, the innovations of OER and Content Access Point (CAP) provide opportunities for success in teacher professional development outcomes.



This presentation is a research-rich and human-captivating story of the partnership between people, technology, innovation, and educational passion. Pictures of dirt roads, bikes, and goats introduce the location of one of humanity's great struggles, educating children for a future with the limitations of today. The people behind the research have the real Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_Î_value. The families and communities changed by the research have even greater value. This presentation will balance the discussion of research with the real application and outcomes of Open Education Resources (OER) on an educationally at-risk population in a context of extreme barriers to information, technology, and teacher professional development.



It is difficult to report the quantitative, non-parametric study using pre and post tests and analysis using the Mann-Whitney U without telling the stories of the faculty in an East African village school squatting in the Š—“bushŠ— accessing information from a passive satellite receiver or the story of the student running across a surrounded field to engage a pedagogically sound classroom experience. Therefore, we will tell both.


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 23 - Bootstrapping an English as Second Language MOOC: What Works and What Doesn't
In the summer of 2016 I taught ENG 099: an English as a Second Language (ESL) Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) using Open Educational Resources for the third time. The first two times under 30 students registered and I taught live video lessons, but last year over 100 students from the Ivory Coast signed up. As a result I changed my approach to more of a self-serve model using Wikiversity as the course home. Each week I published Listening, Reading, Grammar, and/or Mechanics assignments on the course page with Writing and/or speaking homework to be submitted directly to me via e-mail. By the end of the six week course, seven students completed all the assignments and received certificates of completion. All three sequences of the course used only OER for the learning materials.



Following the course I collaboarted with another student at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) to analyze data from the course to understand what were the statistically signficant predictors of student success. Success here was measured as whether or not students finished all the assignments to complete the course. Using a multilevel Bayes Binary Probit Model we found that eagerness (defined as how quick they were to register), whether or not each week's lesson included specific vocabulary words to study, whether or not each week had optional work and the learning period (how much time passed since registartion opened [i.e., how long students had to study]) were the signifcant predictors of student success.



In my presentation I will detail how I created and administered the course as well as the results of the statistical analysis. It will be useful for:

* English as a Second Language teachers looking for examples of how to use OER in their classes,

* Educators hoping to run a MOOC on their own,

* Educators already running MOOCs wanting to learn what determines successful student completion, and

* Educators hoping to reach students in a developing country.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 24 - Degrees of social inclusion: Emerging insights from the ROER4D project
This presentation explores whether, why, and how Open Educational Practices and Resources (OEP&R) contribute to the social inclusion of underserved communities in the Global South by widening access to education, encouraging educational participation, and fostering empowerment of educators and learners. It does so by highlighting emerging insights from the Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) in the Global South project. ROER4D research focuses on OEP&R activities in three regions: South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. It consists of 18 sub-projects with more than 100 participating researchers and research associates in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. The central question posed is: For whom and under what circumstances can engagement with Open educational Practices and Resources promote social inclusion?



The presentation adopts and develops a conceptual framework advanced by Gidley et al. (2010) which suggests that there are Š—“degreesŠ— of social inclusion characterised by notions of access, participation, and empowerment. This means that inclusion should not be understood as a simple binary yes/no outcome. They argue: Š—“Social inclusion can be understood as pertaining to a nested schema regarding degrees of inclusion. The narrowest interpretation pertains to the neoliberal notion of social inclusion as access; a broader interpretation regards the social justice idea of social inclusion as participation; whilst the widest interpretation involves the human potential lens of social inclusion as empowermentŠ— (Gidley et al., 2010). The framework is used to examine the types of social inclusion emergent in a selection of ROER4D studies and concludes that degrees of social inclusion are discernable in the OEP&R adopted by educators, and to a lesser extent by learners.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Research on OER in the Global South (ROER4D) project | Open Research | Open Data
avatar for Henry Trotter

Henry Trotter

Editorial Manager & Researcher, Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)
I'm a researcher and editorial manager for the ROER4D project, based at the University of Cape Town. I work on OER in the Global South.


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 25 - Sharing Open Educational Resources in Ethiopia
Ethiopia is one of the world's oldest and poorest countries. Yet the economy has been booming over the past decade, with annual economic growth around 10% in the past two years. With its goal to become a middle-income country, the Ethiopian government is investing heavily in higher education; from 20,000 students on two campuses in the late 1990s to more than 780,000 students on dozens of campuses today, higher education in Ethiopia is growing at a dizzying rate. With this growth, however, comes significant challenges, including accessing appropriate learning materials. The academic publishing industry in Ethiopia is small, and, with English the language of instruction in Ethiopian higher education, most textbooks are sourced from outside the country, from India, the UK, and the US, among other countries. However, due to a bureaucratic ordering process and prohibitive international shipping, academic libraries in Ethiopia routinely expect to wait two to three years for books to arrive. In this context, open educational resources seem an ideal solution. Yet, in Ethiopia as in many other less economically developed countries, infrastructure can be a significant barrier; in particular, internet bandwidth is limited and power outages common. The presenter spent the 2016-17 academic year in Ethiopia as a Fulbright Scholar, where she incorporated OER into her teaching, gave lectures to Ethiopian faculty on OER, and conducted research on the feasibility of OER in Ethiopian higher education. In her research, she asked this question: Are infrastructure limitations significant enough to off-set the potential usefulness of OER for higher education in East Africa? This presentation shares the results of that researchŠ—”including some surprising concerns of facultyŠ—”as well as the challenges and successes of implementing OER in Ethiopia, with implications for East Africa as well as developing countries around the world.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Petit

Joan Petit

Communications & Outreach Librarian, Portland State University
I served as a Fulbright Scholar at Jimma University in Ethiopia during the 2016-17 academic year. My presentation focuses on my research there on the feasibility of open textbooks in Ethiopian higher education.


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Table 26 - OER Adoption in India
OERs have emerged as one of the key teaching-learning practices that have enhanced the quality of education. In 2008, Indian Government's National Knowledge Commission called for a Š—“National e-content and curriculum initiativeŠ— to enhance and promote OER creation and adoption. The National Mission on Education using ICT also stressed on creation of OER under the scheme. Since then India has undertaken several major projects through national level repositories that create content at every level of education, from primary to higher education. Despite the fact that the OER movement aimsξfor reducing time and cost of technology-enhanced learning environment, its accomplishment and sustainability rely on large-scale participation by educators. This demands consciousness and awareness about the concept of OER among educators and policy adoption of OER by institutions. Our earlier studies have shown that though several faculty of various Indian Universities possess a positive attitude towards OER and are willing to create, adapt and share their content; a larger percentage of educators and academicians often do not believe in sharing their knowledge. Various reasons, such as substantial lack of technical skills, minimal understanding of copyright and licensing, and lack of institutional policy have been recognised. We believe that with more ICT skills and knowledge of OER, the localised needs of academicians can be met which could assist in the promotion of OER. The present paper discusses these reasons along with the current status of OER in India. Various aspects, such as adoption of OER in India, the extent of awareness among educators about OER, various barriers and constraints faced by content creators in creating/adopting OER, the status of strategies adopted at the institutional level, will be discussed. We will also discuss means that could lead to successful implementation of OER and making OER mainstream in Indian higher education.

Speakers
avatar for SAVITHRI SINGH

SAVITHRI SINGH

Principal (Head of organization), Acharya Narendra Dev College (University of Delhi)
Creative Commons Affiliate from India. Have played an advocacy role. Passionate about OER. | | Am also passionate about bird-watching and taking bird photographs - aim to submit more of my images for the commons.


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Royal Ballroom

10:15am

Collaboration and Contrast: How University of Hawaii librarians collaborate to promote OER across contrasting campuses and cultures
Reducing textbook costs and adopting OER became one of the strategic objectives for the 2015-2021 University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan. The System is comprised of 7 community colleges and 3 universities. Librarians were instrumental in bringing the OER conversation to the grassroots level. Librarians leveraged contacts throughout the University of Hawaii System to create a system-wide volunteer UH OER Team that includes librarians, instructional designers, and instructors. The team serves as an advocacy and information-sharing group for all campuses. The tradition of collaboration and information-sharing inherent in the library profession provided a foundation from which OER could take hold in the university system.

Librarians and instructional designers at the two largest community college campuses, Kapiolani and Leeward, established independent OER initiatives on their respective campuses. In summer 2015, these two campuses together received a joint sum of $100K in innovation funding to develop OER on their respective campuses. The two-campus team of three librarians and one instructional designer focused on professional development as the key strategy for increasing faculty awareness of OER and for encouraging adoption. Differences in campus infrastructure and culture resulted in differences in how OER adoption took place. We will highlight the unique challenges that community college librarians experience in their effort to promote OER on their individual campuses. We will also discuss the role of the librarians across this system to make OER a priority across all campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Wayde Oshiro

Wayde Oshiro

Head Librarian, Leeward Community College Library



Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Valencia

10:15am

The Growing Impact of the Web on Open Education
Providing world-class management education in today's global environment is an ongoing challenge. Web- based Learning Management Systems (LMS) embrace many options for presenting content and interacting with students in both individual and collaborative setting, which thus becomes an important OER asset. LMS based hybrid and online programs are well-suited to meet the changing landscape of management education since they provide instructional content at a time, location and pace convenient to the student. The challenge of student learning assurance represents a key success factor in both hybrid and online programs especially in an open educational context. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight how Web-based systems like LMSs can support the goals and objectives of open education with a special emphasis on sharing, gratitude, and hope.

Speakers
avatar for John Buckingham

John Buckingham

Marketing Professor, Pepperdine University
OH

Owen Hall Jr

Professor of Decision Sciences, Pepperdine University


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Imperial

10:15am

Influences from the Year of Open
During 2017, the Year of Open moved quickly from simply being an avenue to recognize significant milestones for open education to becoming a year-long event to bring awareness to all things open.

The Year of Open became a global focus on open processes, systems, and tools, created through collaborative approaches, that enhance our education, businesses, governments, and organizations. At its core, open is a mindset about the way we should meet collective needs and address challenges. It means taking a participative and engaging approach, whether to education, government, business or other areas of daily life. In its practical applications, open is about shared efforts and values to enhance people's opportunities, understanding and experiences.

During the Year of Open, we have captured and displayed efforts to increase participation and understanding of how open contributes to making things better for everyone. In this session, I will discuss the results and share what's next for the Year of Open.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Huggins

Susan Huggins

Director, Communications, Open Education Consortium


Thursday October 12, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
Madrid

11:00am

From Grassroots to Statewide and Everything in Between
The OER movement is growing in Massachusetts! A statewide initiative, funded by the federal TAACCCT grant, kicked off last year for the Massachusetts community colleges. While many of the 15 community colleges had an existing OER project, this new initiative has created a truly collaborative process where faculty work together to adopt, adapt and if necessary, build, high quality OER materials for courses that are common across the state.

Led by Sue and Jody of Northern Essex Community College, this project began with the development of an OER council that included representatives from each of the community college. The council's focus is to promote an open philosophy and to encourage collaboration on OER adoption and development across the state. Go Open mini-grants are the council's main project, scaled from NECC's Adopt Open initiative. These mini-grants solicit proposals from faculty seeking to "Go Open" in their courses. The council also supports statewide events which promote and provide training on OER pedagogy.

Sue and Jody will share the model of the initiative including their role as consultants to the other colleges, the Go Open mini-grant proposal written by the council, the materials created and updates on the project. The presentation will also include information on the benefits and challenges to working with 15 very different and independent community colleges and share some of the unique ideas developed through the collaboration. And, of course, all the materials that go with this work!

Speakers
avatar for Jody Carson

Jody Carson

Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, Northern Essex Community College
avatar for Chelsea Delnero

Chelsea Delnero

Outreach & OER Librarian, Springfield Tech Comm College
avatar for Donna Maturi

Donna Maturi

Coordinator of Library Services, Middlesex Community College
We have had a successful year with our MASS Go Open Initiative at MCC- now we need to sustain and grow our efforts. I am interested in the role of librarians in advocating and assisting faculty in the use of OER; outreach efforts that work; quality control and assessment; and b... Read More →
avatar for Robert Rezendes

Robert Rezendes

Associate Dean, Bristol Community College
PS

Peter Shea

Director of Professional Instructional Development, Middlesex Community College
avatar for Sue Tashjian

Sue Tashjian

Coordinator of Instructional Technolgoy, Northern Essex Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Terrace A - C

11:00am

OER STEM for K12
The Stone Arch Bridge Initiative for Education Resources, SABIER, takes the goals in the five phases of OER-implementation identified in the #GoOpen launch packet and combines them into a custom professional development and curriculum implementation program for grade level teams in a district or teams coming together from smaller districts. SABIER provides the professional development to support teachers in their open teaching practices and in the use of OER curriculum with web devices like iPads and Chromebooks.

SABIER also assists the districts in acquiring funds to pay for the initial transition.

This presentation demonstrates the collaboration of SABIER and the Concord Consortium to provide STEM courses delivered via an LMS that includes outcomes reporting.

Speakers
avatar for Dan McGuire

Dan McGuire

Executive Director, SABIER
Dan McGuire is the Executive Director of the Stone Arch Bridge Initiative for Education Resources which is a non-profit that provides professional development for faculty to increase skill in using Open Educational Resources.  Dan has more than 30 years of experience innovating... Read More →



Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Barcelona

11:00am

Table 1 - Sharing Hope A Million Miles from Home: A Fulbright Specialist in Krygyzstan
In April 2017 I will serve as a Fulbright Specialist on Open Education and Open Educational Resources at the University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. While I cannot say exactly what will happen, I can summarize my understanding of the context, my goals for the trip and hopes for its outcomes.

Nearly every indicator of education (literacy, enrollment, teacher wages, school building infrastructure, etc.) have declined in post-Soviet and newly democratic countries. Rigorous higher education is spoken about on administrative levels but remains out of reach for many students and most people. I hope in my short weeks at UCA to listen and serve well as outside expert, consultant, and advocate. Unlike the program I run here in the U.S. (because I didn't know any better) II hope to begin with open pedagogy as a foundational philosophy. Given the comparative lack of funds available and dearth of non-Soviet learning materials, I also anticipate training library staff and faculty regarding designing/building/attributing culturally relevant open course materials and in exploring tools for assessing campus-level opportunities for engagement in open educational practices.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Open Ed, Copyright & Scholarly Comm Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright, and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech. She works with faculty, administrators, and staff on local, state, national and international levels to inspire faculty to choose, adapt, and create learning resources which are m... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 2 - Embracing a Continuum of Openness: Faculty Perspectives Designing and Delivering a Graduate Program with Openness as Core Value
This presentation will share findings from a research study being conducted on the experience of faculty as they redesign a graduate program in Learning and Technology that has openness as a key design principle. Openness was adopted as a program goal predicated on the philosophical stance that openness and open educational practices facilitate collaboration and cultivate networked learning in its many forms as necessitated by the digital age. The graduate program under study prepares students to design, create, implement and evaluate contemporary digital learning environments that many may not have experienced themselves. By adopting openness as a key design principle, the program presents a model of a contemporary digital learning environment in the context of post-secondary education.

This research examines the faculty experience designing a graduate program along a continuum of openness at a post-secondary institution defined by a blended learning delivery model that to date has no formal institutional open education strategy or open policy in place. Initial findings of how embodying this view of openness impacted the experience of faculty in designing for, and facilitating in, these more open learning spaces will be shared. Research themes such as: the complexity of defining openness within the bounds of a graduate program; alignment between openness and an institutional learning and teaching model; faculty level of risk and comfort and, the impact on course design and delivery will be discussed. Examples of ways in which the 5 R's of openness: retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute (Wiley, 2014) have been applied at program and course level will be shared. Ways in which faculty perceive the digital learning environments they have created with respect to the spectrum of networked and open practices outlined by Paskevicius & Forssman (2017) will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Associate Professor, Director School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 3 - Walking the Walk for Open Pedagogy: Community Design of a Shared Open Educational Resource about Scholarly Communication for Librarians and Learners
Librarians have become a major stakeholder in the open education movement. However, many of the courses in which we are taught our craft are still bound by traditional commercial texts. The open, collaborative nature of OER lends them a unique ability to support community-driven learning and sharing, making them an ideal venue for introducing new learners to a dynamic, aspirational field like scholarly communication. Librarians from three institutions - Kansas, Illinois, and NC State - are developing an OER for training librarians and other learners about what scholarly communication librarianship is and what it has the potential to be.



This presentation describes our work developing a collaborative, community-driven, dynamic OER for introducing students and practitioners to scholarly communication. An open resource is critical to this approach because scholarly communication has a multiplicity of contexts and meanings so institutions, instructors, and learner need to be able tell their own stories. Openness creates a space in which voices historically excluded from presumed Š—“authorityŠ— can influence and even own the narrative, contributing stories which are inspirational and grounded in experiences often left out of traditional textbooks. Join us for an overview of a dynamic new OER project and an exploration of the transformative potential of open pedagogy in librarianship and scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education at KU. I recently became a presenter for the Open Textbook Network, about which I'm very excited. I'm deeply engaged in planning for an upcoming symposium at KU to explore the potential for an open p... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, UIUC
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointme... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, NCSU Libraries
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 4 - Six Key Design Considerations for Leveraging Open in Public Safety Education
The Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) is Canada's leading public safety educator. With 3 schools, 13 divisions and 45 programs, JIBC educates and trains public safety officials ranging from frontline social workers to police officers. Our students are lifelong learners who have numerous points of entry or return to our institution. Learners may enter our programs before employment, as part of their training once employed in the public safety sector or for continuing education and further professional accreditation. Our programs are truly integrated with our frontline worker and first responder communities where we work closely with them to design, develop and delivery our learning. For over five years, JIBC has used our unique student trajectory to design and implement open solutions for course delivery and life-long learning resources.



Open courses and resources are a valuable and practical solution to the numerous training issues and problems that arise when working with in the public safety sector. For example, rather than exclusively looking at learners who are currently in our programs, we look at designing for the long-term. An open resource website that allows policing students to access the legal elements of common criminal offences will also greatly benefit them when they are on the police force. Open design allows us to consider and explore the application of the resource inside and outside of the classroom.



In this session, using the JIBC student trajectory, we'll look at six key design considerations for open within the context of public safety post-secondary education, including:



1. Frequently changing regulations, standards and legislation

2. Widely-distributed learners

3. Mobile accessibility of resources

4. Sensitive material

5. Reducing costs to students

6. Reducing development cost

Speakers
KL

Krista Lambert

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
Senior Instructional Designer, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC)


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 5 - OER-Enabled Pedagogy
Over the past decade, the term Š—“Open Educational ResourcesŠ— has become clearly defined, in part by the 5Rs. In recent years the two terms Š—“Open Educational PracticesŠ— and Š—“Open PedagogyŠ— have been used in various ways, including as synonyms. In this presentation we propose distinctive definitions for these terms and provide examples of each.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Open Education Group at Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

University Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Resear... Read More →
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

A Story after Policy Approval: SBCTC's Infrastructure of Support for Open Licensing Policy Implementation

The implementation of a policy is considered as the most vital phase of the policy cycle as it is at this stage that the success or failure of a policy is determined. Adopted policies are put into effect and the proposed solution will be tested in the real world with all its organizational complexity. 

In late 2016, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) approved a comprehensive open licensing policy and offered a session that introduced the newly approved policy. SBCTC showcased how institutions’ open policies can be crafted, amended, and approved. 

This year's session will discuss SBCTC's year-long journey in the implementation and application of this policy. The session will highlight the infrastructure that SBCTC has established to support staff implementation of open licensing policy. This support system is composed of three interrelated elements including resources, professional development, and a community of practice.

In illustrating the support model used, the session will focus on sharing practical accounts and best practices learned through the implementation process. The strategies and principles used for each implementation stage will be presented with examples and templates. 

SBCTC considers this policy and implementation work as starting points for a more expansive/far reaching Open Policy that will eventually support not only the internal works but also all resources produced by fellow state government agencies. Presenters will discuss the longer-term goals of additional state agency outreach and uptake.


Speakers
avatar for Boyoung Chae

Boyoung Chae

Policy Associate, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges
MJ

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
OER policy development; system level open work and strategy.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Terrace D - F

11:00am

Table 6 - Making Change: Research on Educators' Attitudes Toward OER
The movement toward open educational materials has been slow to gain traction among the teaching mainstream. OERs are still not generally discussed in teacher education programs. According to a study by The Boston Consulting Group (2013), only 21% of educators report being äóìvery awareäó of what OERs are, indicating that they may not be comfortable using them themselves. These findings seem to indicate that educators simply need more education and background on what OERs are and how to use them.



In truth, however, it is not well-understood as to why open educational resources (OERs) have been slow to gain traction among the mainstream of educators. Is it because these OERs are somehow fundamentally flawed or not useful to teachers, or is it simply a lack of knowledge and preparation regarding the use of these materials? Little is known as to why teachers and faculty don't use OERs more frequently, especially because many educators express concern for lowering the cost of materials for their students, one of the primary problems solved by the use of OERs.



To better understand these problems, the presenters embarked on a research project to measure and interpret educator's attitudes towards OERs. This research was conducted using a open online course on finding and using open and free teaching materials. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether additional knowledge and preparation on the use of openly licensed materials helps teachers feel more comfortable using OERs for their own teaching and learning applications. In this session, we'll share our findings from this experience and discuss implications for persuading and training educators on the use of OERs in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Bradford

Katie Bradford

Director, Platform & Partnerships, Instructure
As Director of Platform & Partnerships Marketing at Instructure, Katie’s role is to guide innovation and open education initiatives at Instructure. She works across multiple teams to implement new processes and ideological shifts, marketing initiatives, and product changes that... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Loble

Melissa Loble

VP, Platform, Instructure, Inc.
As those who know me will tell you, I am passionate about using technology to do more than just provide alternatives to traditional teaching and learning practices. I sincerely hope that educational technology can lead the revolution for changing, and truly significantly impacti... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 7 - Motivating factors among faculty for adopting OER
Presenters will share results from a survey of 2014-16 applicants to Affordable Learning Georgia's (ALG) Textbook Transformation Grants, an OER and affordable materials adoption, adaptation, and creation-focused grant program. The survey asked respondents to identify and rank factors motivating their interest in adopting OER, from specific aspects of the ALG grant to a desire for improved student learning. Open-ended questions provided new information about the unanticipated challenges, benefits, and changes to teaching practices related to OER. ALG's strategic planning changes based on these survey results will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

Program Manager, Affordable Learning Georgia, University System of Georgia
avatar for Susan Hrach

Susan Hrach

Director, Faculty Center, Columbus State University
Areas of expertise: Open Educational Resources, study abroad & experiential learning, Renaissance literature, translation studies, 2013 Winner of USG Regents' Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award
avatar for Tomo Nagashima

Tomo Nagashima

Carnegie Mellon University
PhD student at Carnegie Mellon University interested in understanding how people learn online. Previously at Stanford Graduate School of Education working on Open Learning Initiative (OLI). 2016-18 OER Research Fellow. Member of Creative Commons Japan.



Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 8 - Frameworks and strategies for pursuing OER research
It has been shown that OER reduce cost of educational materials without risking academic success (Lovett et al., 2008; Hilton et al., 2013; Pawlyshyn et al., 2013; Bowen et al., 2014; Allen et al., 2015). Additionally, Hilton, Fischer, Wiley, and Williams (2016) demonstrate that students enrolled in courses with OER have a tendency to present higher course grades, are less likely to withdraw from the course, and have a higher chance of enrolling in more credit hours the following semester. While these initial findings are encouraging, studies also clearly acknowledge limitations within the research. In some cases, results are inconclusive and occasionally contradictory. Two factors that contribute to the complexity of studying OER are the nascency of this area of research and the difficulty of identifying causal relationship between OER and student learning and success outcomes.



While the literature shows the spectrum of benefits of OER, both financially at the institutional and student levels as well as facilitating access and student academic success, there is still a need for more research into the relationship between OER and student learning and success outcomes. The benefits of OER are not necessarily seen consistently across courses and institutions. This is confounded by the ever growing concerns around college completion.



This session provides a brief summary of current studies, focusing on methodologies and frameworks for research and identifies areas where more studies are needed. The rest of the session is set up like a workshop. It shares the developing research plan at SF State and includes interactive, hands-on time for participants to discuss their own research interests around OER. The workshop utilizes frameworks, guided questions, and templates to facilitate participant research plan development. Attendees will leave the session with tools to further develop and implement research at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Teggin Summers

Teggin Summers

Manager, Teaching and Learning with Technology, San Francisco State University
Dr. Teggin Summers has spent almost two decades working in educational technologies.  From teaching in an online MOO to leading exploration of emerging technologies for teaching and learning, Teggin has broad experience with tools and techniques for engaging faculty around techn... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 10 - Being Grateful for OER Courses
The science of gratitude shows us that being grateful has many positive benefits in our lives. Approaching OER with an attitude of gratefulness can rewire our brain and make us happier. By being grateful, you'll be more appreciative about the open content you use and be more willing to share your content in return.



In this presentation, I'm going to talk about what researchers have found about gratitude and the positive effects gratitude can have on our lives. You'll also have some tips that can help you become more grateful in your life.

Speakers
avatar for Eugene Jars

Eugene Jars

Instruction Designer, Pima Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 9 - Maintaining Mental Health While Leading Significant Change
Leading change is difficult. It's a constant uphill battle that takes a heavy toll physically, emotionally, and even spiritually. Come join a conversation about how to fight (and win!) the fight that never sleeps and stay healthy while doing it.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 11 - Using OER to Teach Human Resource Management
HR Management is very well suited to course redesign using open data and open resources. SHRM, ONET, salary websites such as salary.com, job search websites such as monster.com, online Department of Labor materials and some publishers can be combined to provide ample free and open material to permit teaching several HRM courses with the most up-to-date information and data. The session will share my experience creating no cost and low cost HRM courses in the areas Compensation, Staffing and Selection, Strategic HRM and Essentials of HRM at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the US, Asia, Europe and Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Norman

Thomas Norman

Associate Professor of Management, CSU, Dominguez Hills


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 12 - Faculty use of OER at Boise State University
This presentation will center on the creation of an Introduction for three areas; a Visual Arts course, a Foundational or General Ed.class, as well as, a class in the Literacy and Culture Program at Boise State University. The classes satisfy one of an undergraduates' core requirements in the Liberal Arts and is most often taken by incoming freshmen. This population is possibly least financially prepared for the cost of the texts and other fees they encounter upon entering college and those costs are often a significant factor in the inability of a student to continue. The texts required by freshmen are also most likely to be recycled or never referred to again in the student's academic career. Many of the students at Boise State are military, whose costs are partially funded by the government, but whose resources are often late in coming during the school year putting them at particular risk of falling behind. Other student groups for whom the cost of text may be particularly challenging are CAMP students who are first generation children of migrant workers or other migrant/immigrant populations. This was the primary impetus behind the instructor's decision to develop an OER text that could be offered at no cost to the students from the first day of instruction. The search for resources and the unexpected obstacles and opportunities encountered on the development of the text is the subject of this workshop.



Case studies on the development, refinement, and implementation of OER materials; focusing on the experience of faculty members, an Instructional Designer, and/or an Instructional Technologist collaborating to make OER come together for specific classes. Problems and solutions in locating, re-mixing, and considerations in licensing of OER will be presented. Issues in accessibility and creating OER material that meet and exceed requirements for accessibility will also be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Casper

Bob Casper

Instructional Design Specialist, Boise State University - IDEA Shop
Bob Casper has been at Boise State University, in Idaho's capital, for over a decade. He currently serves a unit of the University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) called Instructional Design and Educational Assessment (IDEA Shop) as an Instructional Design Specialist wo... Read More →
avatar for Muffet Jones

Muffet Jones

Lecturer, Boise State University
I am a lecturer in art history at Boise State University. I went to NYU and Columbia University and my primary areas of study are 19th and 20th Century American Art. At BSU I teach the Introduction to Art course which fulfills a requirement for undergraduates. The OER text I a... Read More →
avatar for Michael Strickland

Michael Strickland

Language Arts Instructor, INSPIRE Connections Academy
I have taught various classes at Boise State University over the last several years. These include several semesters of children’s literature as well as two years of teaching English to 10th and 11th graders in TRIO/Upward Bound. | | Last year, I was the parent-teacher f... Read More →
avatar for Laurel Traynowicz

Laurel Traynowicz

Associate Professor, Boise State University
Dr. Laurel Traynowicz, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Communication at Boise State University. She earned the MA and PhD in Communication Research at the University of Iowa, and has served as a faculty member at Boise State, University of Arizona and Southern Illinois-Carbonda... Read More →



Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 13 - Adjunct faculty: essential participants in OER adoption and use
More than half of courses in community colleges are taught by adjunct faculty, and institutions reliance on part-time instructors is growing. Often, part-time faculty are disconnected from their institutions and can be less able to effectively support students' use of campus resources, less knowledgeable about course sequences and program maps, and have fewer opportunities to participate in campus initiatives, such as the planning and development of OER degrees.



Faculty involvement has been critical to the success of past OER projects. However, despite the efforts of individual colleges, the field has not devised scalable strategies for more deeply integrating adjunct faculty into the strategic work of community colleges. In June 2016, Achieving the Dream launched the Engaging Adjunct Faculty in the Student Success Movement initiative to better understand both the opportunities and challenges faced by community colleges working to engage part-time faculty in their institutional student success efforts.



While this initiative is just over a year old, some early findings from the six pilot colleges have emerged that may be instructive for colleges hoping to involve adjunct faculty in OER projects. During this session, the presenters will introduce ATD's OER Degree and Engaging Adjunct Faculty Initiatives, provide a rationale for engaging adjunct faculty in the development of OER degrees, and offer several possible strategies, drawn from both ATD projects, for accomplishing this.

Speakers
JI

Jon Iuzzini

Associate Director of Teaching & Learning, Achieving the Dream
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Iitiative, Achieving the Dream, Inc.
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources.Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technol... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Doubling down: Bootstrapping an OER program through faculty- and student-focused initiatives at FSU
Our campus did not have a formal OER program until November 2016. Since then, a team from our Libraries launched two OER advocacy initiatives focused on students and instructors, respectively. This presentation will show how we drew on resources from the broader OER community to "bootstrap" our program in a short period of time. Specifically, we will discuss the formation and composition of our team, the resources we used to plan and develop our initiatives, practical challenges and lessons learned from program implementation, preliminary results from a student survey on textbook affordability, and our plans for future program development.

For our student-focused initiative, we partnered with our Student Government Association to organize two #textbookbroke tabling events during Open Education Week 2017. We provided a number of interactive activities to encourage student participation, including an engagement board and a short survey. With 350 students participating, this proved to be a very effective way to raise student awareness about OER and gather data on the impact of high textbook costs at our institution.

Concurrently with #textbookbroke, our team also implemented an Alternative Textbook Grants program to support instructors in their efforts to replace commercial textbooks with more open, affordable alternatives. Successful applicants received $1000 in grant funding as well as support from our team on material selection, copyright and licensing, and instructional design. Early projections suggest that the first round of grantees could save students up to $41,419 in textbook costs in the first year after implementing their alternative textbooks.

By sharing about the experience of launching these initiatives, we hope to provide both inspiration and a practical roadmap for colleagues at campuses that are just getting started with OER, as well as helpful data and points of comparison for those at institutions with more developed OER programs.

Speakers
JP

Jeffrey Phillips

Instruction and Learning Services Librarian, Florida State University
avatar for Devin Soper

Devin Soper

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Florida State University
avatar for Lindsey Wharton

Lindsey Wharton

Extended Campus & Distance Services Librarian, Florida State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Valencia

11:00am

Table 14 - The School Librarian's Role in the Adoption of Open Textbooks
Librarians in higher education are integral in the adoption and use of OER at their institutions.However, school librarians have a different role in the adoption process. This presentation aims to examine ongoing research on P12 schools' use of their librarians. #GoOpen schools agree to replace at least one traditional textbook with an open textbook within a year. Agreeing to participate in the initiative means the school will äóìidentify a district #GoOpen team who will work to develop a strategy for the implementation of openly-licensed educational materials, commit to replace at least one textbook with openly-licensed educational materials in the next year, and document and share their implementation processäó (#GoOpen Districts). For P12 schools the chance of locating an open textbook that meets their needs may be limited depending on the subject and level of the open textbook they are considering. Librarians are trained to locate, access, and evaluate resources; therefore, it would seem that the schools participating in this initiative would utilize their school librarians when undergoing this transition.

This presentation will report on findings based on the research questions:

(1) How many #GoOpen schools are using their school librarians in their open textbooks adopting process?

(2) How are school librarians being used in open textbook adoption process for schools participating in the #GoOpen campaign?

(3) Why are schools who are not using school librarians choosing to not include them in the open textbook adoption process?


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 15 - The hardest nut to crack: generating buy-in with your librarian colleagues
Libraries' involvement in leading and supporting open education initiatives is growing rapidly. Many librarians', however, find that their biggest obstacle to open education engagement on their campus is not faculty or administration--it's resistance from their colleagues in the library! Open education programs cannot gain the necessary traction on our campuses through the efforts of one person. How can we bring our colleagues on board, helping them see developing an open education program is more than a creating a libguide? How can we help them get past the idea that äóìthis is just one more thing I have to do?äó How can you facilitate conversations about open education, especially when you are not in a management position? This presentation will discuss strategies for generating buy in with the colleagues that aren't yet on board with open education. Attendees will gain steps to take at their local libraries. For libraries to successfully advance open education on our campuses, we need our colleagues to join us. Let's crack that nut!

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 16 - Connecter, Adviser, Creator: The Role of the Instructional Design Librarian in Campus OER Initiatives
In any affordable learning initiative there are many moving parts. There is the macro view where various campus units and departments must collaborate to market affordable learning/OER and to plan programs that facilitate faculty adoption into their courses. There is also the micro view: the technical aspects of adopting new course materials and integrating them into our learning management system, whether library-licensed content, OER, or something else altogether.

In this presentation, I will outline the skills and knowledge that facilitate my contributions to campus affordable learning initiatives as one university's Instructional Design Librarian. My background in instructional design and educational technology combined with my experience in library and information science positions me as a competent contributor to campus initiatives.

As Instructional Design Librarian at a large regional university, I work to build relationships that connect the library with the many units and departments that collaborate on our affordable learning initiative. I advise campus leaders, instructional designers, librarians, and faculty on how to navigate and evaluate their various options for affordable and open content. I answer questions on Fair Use and appropriate reuse of copyrighted instructional materials. I create online tutorials and deliver workshops on library-licensed content, OER, copyright and Creative Commons. I serve on committees to write OER-related grants and help plan campus events related to affordable learning.

The same skills and knowledge that help me advance my library's on-campus instruction and distance learning programs as Instructional Design Librarian also prove to be essential to helping our campus make progress on advancing affordable learning.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay O'Neill

Lindsay O'Neill

Instructional Design Librarian, California State University, Fullerton
I am the Instructional Design Librarian at Cal State Fullerton in southern California as well as a part-time faculty member in our Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology program. I design and develop online learning using Storyline, Captivate, and Camtasia, and... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 17 - OER 'Sustainable Learning' an effective Hands-on Workshop with Faculty
How much time does it take to effectively learn about, find and evaluate open educational resources? We found a 3 hour hands-on workshop with faculty is an effective way to promote awareness and adoption strategies within a faculty development program. We are interested in sharing the iterative design of our hands-on faculty workshop with librarians interested in advocating OERs. What has worked, what changes we have made to effectively support our faculty adopt, adapt, and author open educational resources. Basic outline of workshops; textbook conversation, creative commons, finding and evaluating OERs, leveraging library and HathiTrust, and authoring OERs with classroom activities to publishing with Humboldt State University Press.

Speakers
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 18 - Connect OER
The movement for OER in Canada and the United States has been accelerating, with numerous institutions launching initiatives to support the creation, adoption, adaptation and awareness of OER. While there are a number of successful efforts to organize networks, communities, and consortia, many activities also happen organically without visibility outside their institution.

Recognizing the need to better track and share information about the efforts institutions have taken to advance OER, SPARC developed Connect OER. This presentation will provide attendees with an opportunity to learn more about the project as well as key findings from our first Annual Connect OER Report.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. I've devoted my career to advocating for open education to benefit students — starting back when I was an undergraduate student myself frustrated with expensive textbooks in the information-rich world we live in. My ex... Read More →
avatar for Brady Yano

Brady Yano

Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC
Come chat with me about Connect OER, OpenCon, the OER Digest, libraries and student engagement!


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Making OER Easy and Preventing Lock-in With Tech Standards
Let's spend some time considering the full learning environments of faculty and learners when adopting OER and open pedagogy. A teacher doesn't have time to manage content, assessments, and homework across 3 systems. Forcing a learner to handle different systems for each class causes unnecessary stress and overhead to their semester. We can make this easier with open integration standards.

Sometimes you need to move between platforms and you don't want to have to redo all the work you put into customization. Or possibly even lose all the content! Your course should be portable regardless of whether you're using a custom local system, a common open source project, or an EdTech vendor's platform. We'll cover common portability standards and how you can understand the impact any given platform will have on your ability to migrate.

Speakers
avatar for Bracken Mosbacker

Bracken Mosbacker

Director of Development, Lumen Learning


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Imperial

11:00am

Table 19 - Remixing OER into the LMS
We'll discuss a practical approach to discovering OER, combining it with other OER and non-OER and then delivering it to students via the LMS.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 20 - Go Open with Google Apps
Learn about the new G Suite for Education, formerly Google Apps for Education, and how it can be integrated with Open Educational Resources. We will explore the free resources provided by Google and how to harness them for use with OERs in both classroom and professional settings. With uses ranging from collaborative documents to live hangouts, the G Suite provides a number of efficient, effective, and free tools to allow students to interact locally or remotely, synchronously or asynchronously.

Speakers
avatar for Edie Erickson

Edie Erickson

Instructional Designer, Bay de Noc Community College
Hi! I'm Edie and I'm an instructional designer and adjunct instructor from Michigan's Upper Peninsula. After spending almost 10 years as a third grade teacher, I've recently begun working as an instructional designer at Bay de Noc Community College. In this role, I have worked ex... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 21 - A Pressbooks Vision for Open Textbooks
Pressbooks is an open source book publishing platform, used by a growing number of Open Textbook projects.



In this talk, Hugh McGuire, founder of Pressbooks, will talk about why Open Textbooks offer such exciting technical possibilities for Pressbooks. He'll give an overview of the Pressbooks development roadmap, with a focus on Open Textbooks-specific features.



At Pressbooks, our primary objective is to build new features and improvements to meet the needs of the open textbook publishing community, and our roadmap is evolving accordingly.



In this talk, Pressbooks founder Hugh McGuire will talk about Š—“Pressbooks as a platformŠ—, with thoughts about a long-term technical vision for Open Textbook infrastructure, including:



1. Finding and Š—“cloningŠ— openly licensed Pressbooks books

2. APIs and Š—“service layersŠ—

2. Version control and feedback to original authors

3. Accessibility

5. Improving the web book interface

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 22 - Tradeoffs when aiming for multi-platform output targets
Open Up Resources and Illustrative Mathematics have designed a middle school math curriculum, and build a custom content management system and authoring environment. The system allows for a number of output formats, including print-ready PDF, HTML, and Common Cartridge for learning management systems.



The goal in creating the system was to be able to deliver OER to districts regardless of their technology readiness. Districts who need print can get print and districts who want a digital format have several to choose from.



While this approach has been successful, there are clearly tradeoffs that have implications to the broader OER community. For one, developing a content management system (or even adapting an existing one) is a resource-intensive project. And perhaps more importantly, this multi-platform approach can muddy the capability of downstream users to revise and remix the content.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 23 - Current developments of the OER World Map Project
We recently described the OER World Map as a Š—“project in its adolescenceŠ— [1], meaning that after two years of development it has reached a state, in which it starts to provide user value without having achieve full maturity yet.



One indicator of the growing acceptance of the platform is the increasing number of cooperations with other initiatives. The presentation will provide an update on several activities, which we will drive forward in 2017:



1) OERInfo: Germany started its first major OER program [2] at the end of 2016. As part of program, OER World Map participates in the generation of the Š—“Informationsstelle OERŠ—, a central information website on OER. One outcome will be a Š—“Country Map InterfaceŠ—, which shifts the focus of the platform to the national community. After successful implementation, we will provide this functionality for other countries as well.



2) Lighthouses: In preparation to UNESCO`s second OER World Congress we are planning to implement a Š—“lighthouse functionŠ— [3], which will allow users to like initiatives, which have proven to provide sustainable value. By doing so it will be possible to identify good practise examples, which can serve as role models for countries or institutions new to OER.



3) Cooperation with OEC: One of our current projects partnering the Open Education Consortium is to use the OER World Map as a tool to support ongoing OEC activity like the Year of Open, a CCCOER members map and Open Education Week. During the course of the project, automatic data import as well as the display of World Map elements in OEC websites will be refined and extended.



The presentation will also give an overview of the roadmap of its way to Š—“grow upŠ— in the near future!



[1] http://www.slideshare.net/JanNeumann4/oer-world-map-adolescence-of-a-community-platform

[2] https://oerworldmap.org/resource/urn:uuid:3f11cdbd-a74a-4aa4-83b3-b4148bfdbe82

[3] https://github.com/hbz/oerworldmap/issues/1128

Speakers
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 24 - OA Family and Community Engagement Curriculum for Higher Ed Teacher Prep Programs
Instructor-facing curriculum known as the "Framework for Community Embeddedness in Teacher Preparation" is a series of digitally-accessed instructional modules for university instructors to be embed into teacher prep coursework and clinical experiences. The modules' curriculum is designed to provide student teachers opportunities to engage with community members and families through a parent/teacher candidate home visit, and a series of community-based activities designed to make teacher candidates aware of the resources and support services available to them and the children and families they serve.



The framework and accompanying modules provide teacher preparation faculty with a series of intentional, systematic, instructional plans that facilitate TCs learning about communities, schools, families, and students while examining their own practice and its effects on student learning. Each module is framed using an inquiry framework, which asks student teachers to investigate local knowledge that is contextualized, relevant, and meaningful in the environment in which their students live and learn for the purpose of partnering with families and communities to promote the growth and development of the children they serve.



The ultimate goal is to widely share these modules with other teacher preparation programs at ASU and other institutions of higher education at no cost and with no restricted access.

Speakers
avatar for Lori Ellingford

Lori Ellingford

Director, iTeachAZ Community Embeddedness Project, Arizona State University, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 25 - Where the Wild Things Are: Virtually Open Education
The potential uses of virtual reality (VR) technology in education are boundless. Yet, there is almost no substantial research on best practices for developing VR for education nor on virtual reality open educational resources (VROERs). In this presentation, we overview cutting-edge open education practices using VR. We introduce our openly-licensed 3D spatial environment of British Columbia's Stanley Park. This 3D spatial environment is a first of its kind, experimental VROER developed at the University of British Columbia (UBC) by a collaborative group of geography faculty, UBC Studios filmmakers, digital media writers, professional VR developers (MetanautVR), and over a dozen undergraduate student researchers and developers. In 2016, a seed grant from BCCampus allowed our team to start experimenting with photogrammetry, drones, and open source software (scuh as Unity) to make and use VROERs. The aims of our team included creating VROER to overcome the the financial and logistic barriers to accessing field trip locations, leverage the imaginative potential of VR experiences to enhance learning gains, establishing best practices for VROER development, and developing VROER as part of an open pedagogy process. We will walk you through our challenges, successes, and lessons learned. We believe that VR is not simply another edtech fetish, but rather the basis of a revolutionary medium that learners and educators must begin to explore. The potential experiences we can create allow learners to transcend physical principles and traverse geography, scale, and temporal periods. Moreover, this exploration and playing where the wild things are, allows us to establish openly licensed content as a fundamental part of VR for education - a VROER ecosystem that encourages collaboration and focus on learning outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Gill Green

Arthur Gill Green

Professor, UBC
I work on property rights, GIScience, and Open Pedagogy. Three very different areas that have come to be symbiotic in my research and work. Would love to talk to fans of QGIS, people working on property rights, or people attempting to integrate open educational practices in their... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 26 - The OER Media Landscape and Our Collective Communications Imperative
OER is no longer a new movement - the media are now paying real attention. As awareness of OER continues to gain traction around the U.S. - and the world - journalists and the audiences they influence are trying to understand the benefits, complexities and nuances of this groundbreaking system for creating and using teaching and learning materials.



Join us for a high-level view of the news coverage around OER, in both trade and mainstream publications, to learn key findings about how reporters are covering the movement. In this session, we will unpack the methodology and learnings from a comprehensive media analysis to answer key questions, including which publications are covering OER, how reporters are framing their stories and defining OER, the sources they are using, and any inaccuracies that they may be spreading.



Learn how the findings from our media analysis provide concrete lessons on what it means for communications work in the OER field. Where are the opportunities for stakeholders from the OER community to engage with and influence reporters? Where are the possible threats to the movement, and how do we respond quickly to correct misinformation?



The media has proven receptive to voices from within the OER community, but has also been vulnerable to messaging from unfriendly stakeholders attempting to co-opt the definition of OER to serve their interests. That's why now is the time for the movement to solidify and amplify the definition and story of OER--at the heart of which is the many benefits that it offers to all students.

Join the conversation to understand how we can win more champions on behalf of OER.

Speakers
TH

Tanja Hester

Senior Vice President, GMMB


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 27 - Copyright Questions: Incorporating 3rd Party Quotations, Illustrations, and more into OER
As the demand for OER increases and states and districts work to create new OER, there are growing questions about how and when 3rd party materials can be incorporated into OER. Many subjects are difficult or impossible to teach without including quotations, illustrations and other third party materials in education and evaluation materials. This presentation will highlight examples of these uses and discuss how to understand when fair use, or other limitations to copyright law permit these uses.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Jacob

Meredith Jacob

Public Lead, Creative Commons USA
I work at American University Washington College of Law - at the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property - pijip.org. We're also the home of Creative Commons United States - the US Creative Commons Affiliate. I'm interested in public interest intellectual prope... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

Open Educational Resources Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

This Hidden Market is the New Majority: What OER Creators Need to Know About the Unique Needs of Adult Learners
Stemming from the ongoing Power in Numbers project from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), subject matter experts and program staff will come together to discuss the state of OER in adult education, and what OER creators need to know to serve the needs of this underserved market segment. With a focus on the unique needs and learning styles of adult learners - a massive and underserved market segment, the panel will communicate lessons learned from the project's research activities and teacher user groups. Panelists will include OER experts, adult learning experts, and representatives from federal work on OER in adult ed. Discussion topics will include the importance of resource contextualization, andragogy and adult learning style, and how materials can be adapted for the adult audience. Aimed at an educator and OER creator audience, this panel will give listeners actionable advice on bridging this crucial and underserved segment, as well as insight and wisdom gained from the panelists' collective years of passionate service to the adult learner community.

Speakers
avatar for Amee Evans Godwin

Amee Evans Godwin

Director, Innovation, ISKME
Director at ISKME in applied research and development focused on professional learning and collaboration. Founding Program Director of ISKME's digital public library, OER Commons. Advises on and directs the development and implementation of new programs, especially to support ope... Read More →
avatar for Gerry Hanley

Gerry Hanley

Assistant Vice-Chancellor, ATS, CSU Office of the Chancellor
Administrator for the California State University system of 23 campuses serving 479,000 students. Executive Director of MERLOT, a free and open educational library and service center for K-12 and higher education. Director of SkillsCommons, a free and open educational library... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Harper

Christopher Harper

Senior Analyst, Luminary Labs
Working with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education to enhance the teaching and learning of adult mathematics through OER. | Check out the Power in Numbers project: https://lincs.ed.gov/professional-development/federal-initiatives/p... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:55am
Grenada

11:00am

Building Faculty Communities of Practice through Community Hubs
Sharing is a key attribute of Open Education practice. Instructors who have chosen to adopt open textbooks for their college courses understand the value of sharing and sought a venue for offering the valuable resources they created to support their teaching.

To support this need and to further the creation of OER, Rice University's OpenStax and ISKME's OER Commons partnered to provide an online community hub where instructors can freely share and modify syllabuses, homework, study guides, and other open-copyright course materials that are made specifically for each of the free textbooks in OpenStax's growing catalog.

This community hub brings educators together in a new way, emphasizing their communities of practice though collaborative working groups. Educators are encouraged to share, discuss, and curate OER using this community hub, creating a dynamic environment for open education practice.

The OpenStax community hub on OER Commons launched in Fall 2016. Since that launch OpenStax and ISKME have partnered on several well attended webinars and continue to see the interest and engagement in the hub grow.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, OpenStax, Rice University
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college re... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:55am
Madrid

11:30am

Strategies for Adopting OER in a Reluctant Department
1. Beginnings of OER in one department

2. Initial objections to OER in the department and campuswide

3. Strategies for addressing department concerns

4. Strategies for addressing campus concerns

5. Expanding OER for an increasing number of courses


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Terrace A - C

11:30am

Table 1 - Sharing Hope A Million Miles from Home: A Fulbright Specialist in Krygyzstan
In April 2017 I will serve as a Fulbright Specialist on Open Education and Open Educational Resources at the University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. While I cannot say exactly what will happen, I can summarize my understanding of the context, my goals for the trip and hopes for its outcomes.

Nearly every indicator of education (literacy, enrollment, teacher wages, school building infrastructure, etc.) have declined in post-Soviet and newly democratic countries. Rigorous higher education is spoken about on administrative levels but remains out of reach for many students and most people. I hope in my short weeks at UCA to listen and serve well as outside expert, consultant, and advocate. Unlike the program I run here in the U.S. (because I didn't know any better) II hope to begin with open pedagogy as a foundational philosophy. Given the comparative lack of funds available and dearth of non-Soviet learning materials, I also anticipate training library staff and faculty regarding designing/building/attributing culturally relevant open course materials and in exploring tools for assessing campus-level opportunities for engagement in open educational practices.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Open Ed, Copyright & Scholarly Comm Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright, and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech. She works with faculty, administrators, and staff on local, state, national and international levels to inspire faculty to choose, adapt, and create learning resources which are m... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 2 - Embracing a Continuum of Openness: Faculty Perspectives Designing and Delivering a Graduate Program with Openness as Core Value
This presentation will share findings from a research study being conducted on the experience of faculty as they redesign a graduate program in Learning and Technology that has openness as a key design principle. Openness was adopted as a program goal predicated on the philosophical stance that openness and open educational practices facilitate collaboration and cultivate networked learning in its many forms as necessitated by the digital age. The graduate program under study prepares students to design, create, implement and evaluate contemporary digital learning environments that many may not have experienced themselves. By adopting openness as a key design principle, the program presents a model of a contemporary digital learning environment in the context of post-secondary education.

This research examines the faculty experience designing a graduate program along a continuum of openness at a post-secondary institution defined by a blended learning delivery model that to date has no formal institutional open education strategy or open policy in place. Initial findings of how embodying this view of openness impacted the experience of faculty in designing for, and facilitating in, these more open learning spaces will be shared. Research themes such as: the complexity of defining openness within the bounds of a graduate program; alignment between openness and an institutional learning and teaching model; faculty level of risk and comfort and, the impact on course design and delivery will be discussed. Examples of ways in which the 5 R's of openness: retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute (Wiley, 2014) have been applied at program and course level will be shared. Ways in which faculty perceive the digital learning environments they have created with respect to the spectrum of networked and open practices outlined by Paskevicius & Forssman (2017) will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Associate Professor, Director School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 3 - Walking the Walk for Open Pedagogy: Community Design of a Shared Open Educational Resource about Scholarly Communication for Librarians and Learners
Librarians have become a major stakeholder in the open education movement. However, many of the courses in which we are taught our craft are still bound by traditional commercial texts. The open, collaborative nature of OER lends them a unique ability to support community-driven learning and sharing, making them an ideal venue for introducing new learners to a dynamic, aspirational field like scholarly communication. Librarians from three institutions - Kansas, Illinois, and NC State - are developing an OER for training librarians and other learners about what scholarly communication librarianship is and what it has the potential to be.



This presentation describes our work developing a collaborative, community-driven, dynamic OER for introducing students and practitioners to scholarly communication. An open resource is critical to this approach because scholarly communication has a multiplicity of contexts and meanings so institutions, instructors, and learner need to be able tell their own stories. Openness creates a space in which voices historically excluded from presumed Š—“authorityŠ— can influence and even own the narrative, contributing stories which are inspirational and grounded in experiences often left out of traditional textbooks. Join us for an overview of a dynamic new OER project and an exploration of the transformative potential of open pedagogy in librarianship and scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education at KU. I recently became a presenter for the Open Textbook Network, about which I'm very excited. I'm deeply engaged in planning for an upcoming symposium at KU to explore the potential for an open p... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, UIUC
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointme... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, NCSU Libraries
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 4 - Six Key Design Considerations for Leveraging Open in Public Safety Education
The Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) is Canada's leading public safety educator. With 3 schools, 13 divisions and 45 programs, JIBC educates and trains public safety officials ranging from frontline social workers to police officers. Our students are lifelong learners who have numerous points of entry or return to our institution. Learners may enter our programs before employment, as part of their training once employed in the public safety sector or for continuing education and further professional accreditation. Our programs are truly integrated with our frontline worker and first responder communities where we work closely with them to design, develop and delivery our learning. For over five years, JIBC has used our unique student trajectory to design and implement open solutions for course delivery and life-long learning resources.



Open courses and resources are a valuable and practical solution to the numerous training issues and problems that arise when working with in the public safety sector. For example, rather than exclusively looking at learners who are currently in our programs, we look at designing for the long-term. An open resource website that allows policing students to access the legal elements of common criminal offences will also greatly benefit them when they are on the police force. Open design allows us to consider and explore the application of the resource inside and outside of the classroom.



In this session, using the JIBC student trajectory, we'll look at six key design considerations for open within the context of public safety post-secondary education, including:



1. Frequently changing regulations, standards and legislation

2. Widely-distributed learners

3. Mobile accessibility of resources

4. Sensitive material

5. Reducing costs to students

6. Reducing development cost

Speakers
KL

Krista Lambert

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
Senior Instructional Designer, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC)


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 5 - OER-Enabled Pedagogy
Over the past decade, the term Š—“Open Educational ResourcesŠ— has become clearly defined, in part by the 5Rs. In recent years the two terms Š—“Open Educational PracticesŠ— and Š—“Open PedagogyŠ— have been used in various ways, including as synonyms. In this presentation we propose distinctive definitions for these terms and provide examples of each.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Open Education Group at Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

University Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Resear... Read More →
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Brazil Open Education Initiative
Educadigital Institute and UNESCO Chair in Open Education Brazil has launched, during the Americas Regional Consultation, the Open Education Initiative. (www.aberta.org.br)

The idea is to join all the projects and outputs of the both institutions who have been working on this subject since 2007. The platform includes information on academic research, publications, productions of resources and repositories, as well as face-to-face and distance learning opportunities.

Open Education Initiative is already providing the first online course about OER to the Federal Universities which belongs to the UAB Program (Open University of Brazil) from Ministry of Education. UAB is a wide scale governmental program to provide higher education to the teachers on Basic Education in Brazil (Primary and High School). The technology used is Moodle, an open software.

One of the most important publications that is available on the new platform is the study about Open Innovation in Education: concepts and business model. It is the first report about the possibilities of integration between educational market and the economy for the common good.

The platform (www.aberta.org.br) also includes a new referatory/repository, called RE-li-A, for indicates only digital resources available in the internet with an open licences (CC), classified by type of medium, level of education, area of knowledge. RE-li-A is been developing with a crowdfunding campaign (www.catarse.me/relia).

As soon as it is ready, RE-li-A will be integrated with the new platform that Ministry of Education is providing to fulfil the implementation of the commitment 6 of OGP-Brazil 3rd National Plan. For the first time, OGP Brazil has a commitment related to OER, Open Education and decentralized curation. This commitment was elaborated in 2016 in a unprecedented cocriation process, with people from government, civil society, private foundations and edtech-startups.

Speakers
avatar for Priscila Gonsales

Priscila Gonsales

executive-director, Educadigital Institute
Ashoka’s fellow, I have a Master in Education, Family and Technology at Salamanca University (UPSA-Spain), a post-graduation in Communication Process Management at São Paulo University (USP-Brazil) and has graduated in Journalism at Cásper Líbero (Brazil). I've been working... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Terrace D - F

11:30am

Table 6 - Making Change: Research on Educators' Attitudes Toward OER
The movement toward open educational materials has been slow to gain traction among the teaching mainstream. OERs are still not generally discussed in teacher education programs. According to a study by The Boston Consulting Group (2013), only 21% of educators report being äóìvery awareäó of what OERs are, indicating that they may not be comfortable using them themselves. These findings seem to indicate that educators simply need more education and background on what OERs are and how to use them.



In truth, however, it is not well-understood as to why open educational resources (OERs) have been slow to gain traction among the mainstream of educators. Is it because these OERs are somehow fundamentally flawed or not useful to teachers, or is it simply a lack of knowledge and preparation regarding the use of these materials? Little is known as to why teachers and faculty don't use OERs more frequently, especially because many educators express concern for lowering the cost of materials for their students, one of the primary problems solved by the use of OERs.



To better understand these problems, the presenters embarked on a research project to measure and interpret educator's attitudes towards OERs. This research was conducted using a open online course on finding and using open and free teaching materials. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether additional knowledge and preparation on the use of openly licensed materials helps teachers feel more comfortable using OERs for their own teaching and learning applications. In this session, we'll share our findings from this experience and discuss implications for persuading and training educators on the use of OERs in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Bradford

Katie Bradford

Director, Platform & Partnerships, Instructure
As Director of Platform & Partnerships Marketing at Instructure, Katie’s role is to guide innovation and open education initiatives at Instructure. She works across multiple teams to implement new processes and ideological shifts, marketing initiatives, and product changes that... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Loble

Melissa Loble

VP, Platform, Instructure, Inc.
As those who know me will tell you, I am passionate about using technology to do more than just provide alternatives to traditional teaching and learning practices. I sincerely hope that educational technology can lead the revolution for changing, and truly significantly impacti... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 7 - Motivating factors among faculty for adopting OER
Presenters will share results from a survey of 2014-16 applicants to Affordable Learning Georgia's (ALG) Textbook Transformation Grants, an OER and affordable materials adoption, adaptation, and creation-focused grant program. The survey asked respondents to identify and rank factors motivating their interest in adopting OER, from specific aspects of the ALG grant to a desire for improved student learning. Open-ended questions provided new information about the unanticipated challenges, benefits, and changes to teaching practices related to OER. ALG's strategic planning changes based on these survey results will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

Program Manager, Affordable Learning Georgia, University System of Georgia
avatar for Susan Hrach

Susan Hrach

Director, Faculty Center, Columbus State University
Areas of expertise: Open Educational Resources, study abroad & experiential learning, Renaissance literature, translation studies, 2013 Winner of USG Regents' Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award
avatar for Tomo Nagashima

Tomo Nagashima

Carnegie Mellon University
PhD student at Carnegie Mellon University interested in understanding how people learn online. Previously at Stanford Graduate School of Education working on Open Learning Initiative (OLI). 2016-18 OER Research Fellow. Member of Creative Commons Japan.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 8 - Frameworks and strategies for pursuing OER research
It has been shown that OER reduce cost of educational materials without risking academic success (Lovett et al., 2008; Hilton et al., 2013; Pawlyshyn et al., 2013; Bowen et al., 2014; Allen et al., 2015). Additionally, Hilton, Fischer, Wiley, and Williams (2016) demonstrate that students enrolled in courses with OER have a tendency to present higher course grades, are less likely to withdraw from the course, and have a higher chance of enrolling in more credit hours the following semester. While these initial findings are encouraging, studies also clearly acknowledge limitations within the research. In some cases, results are inconclusive and occasionally contradictory. Two factors that contribute to the complexity of studying OER are the nascency of this area of research and the difficulty of identifying causal relationship between OER and student learning and success outcomes.



While the literature shows the spectrum of benefits of OER, both financially at the institutional and student levels as well as facilitating access and student academic success, there is still a need for more research into the relationship between OER and student learning and success outcomes. The benefits of OER are not necessarily seen consistently across courses and institutions. This is confounded by the ever growing concerns around college completion.



This session provides a brief summary of current studies, focusing on methodologies and frameworks for research and identifies areas where more studies are needed. The rest of the session is set up like a workshop. It shares the developing research plan at SF State and includes interactive, hands-on time for participants to discuss their own research interests around OER. The workshop utilizes frameworks, guided questions, and templates to facilitate participant research plan development. Attendees will leave the session with tools to further develop and implement research at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Teggin Summers

Teggin Summers

Manager, Teaching and Learning with Technology, San Francisco State University
Dr. Teggin Summers has spent almost two decades working in educational technologies.  From teaching in an online MOO to leading exploration of emerging technologies for teaching and learning, Teggin has broad experience with tools and techniques for engaging faculty around techn... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 10 - Being Grateful for OER Courses
The science of gratitude shows us that being grateful has many positive benefits in our lives. Approaching OER with an attitude of gratefulness can rewire our brain and make us happier. By being grateful, you'll be more appreciative about the open content you use and be more willing to share your content in return.



In this presentation, I'm going to talk about what researchers have found about gratitude and the positive effects gratitude can have on our lives. You'll also have some tips that can help you become more grateful in your life.

Speakers
avatar for Eugene Jars

Eugene Jars

Instruction Designer, Pima Community College


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 9 - Maintaining Mental Health While Leading Significant Change
Leading change is difficult. It's a constant uphill battle that takes a heavy toll physically, emotionally, and even spiritually. Come join a conversation about how to fight (and win!) the fight that never sleeps and stay healthy while doing it.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 11 - Using OER to Teach Human Resource Management
HR Management is very well suited to course redesign using open data and open resources. SHRM, ONET, salary websites such as salary.com, job search websites such as monster.com, online Department of Labor materials and some publishers can be combined to provide ample free and open material to permit teaching several HRM courses with the most up-to-date information and data. The session will share my experience creating no cost and low cost HRM courses in the areas Compensation, Staffing and Selection, Strategic HRM and Essentials of HRM at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the US, Asia, Europe and Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Norman

Thomas Norman

Associate Professor of Management, CSU, Dominguez Hills


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

A Model for OER Sustainability

With little question, OER have the potential to greatly improve affordability, access, and student success in education. Yet, to achieve the greatest impact, OER need to be successfully adopted at scale with intentional planning for sustainability. In this session, the authors present a model for identifying and defining eight dimensions of sustainability in OER adoption:

  • open content creation

  • institutional program management

  • initial course design and course refresh

  • faculty development

  • content sustainability and development

  • marketing and communications

  • technical support

  • research and reporting

The model will demonstrate how to prioritize these various dimensions, how their interrelated nature impacts sustainable OER adoption, and ultimately how each dimension facilitates OER adoption at scale for the greatest long-term impact. The model draws on the empirical examples from ongoing system-level higher education OER initiatives at the City University of New York (CUNY), the State University System of New York (SUNY), and the University System of Maryland (USM) to demonstrate real-world approaches to engaging with these various dimensions of institutional OER transformation.



Speakers
MB

MJ Bishop

Director, Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, University System of Maryland
AF

Ann Fiddler

Open Education Librarian, City University of New York
CH

Carey Hatch

Interim Sr. Assoc Provost, SUNY System Administration
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Library Senior Strategist, SUNY System Administration
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Barcelona

11:30am

Table 12 - Faculty use of OER at Boise State University
This presentation will center on the creation of an Introduction for three areas; a Visual Arts course, a Foundational or General Ed.class, as well as, a class in the Literacy and Culture Program at Boise State University. The classes satisfy one of an undergraduates' core requirements in the Liberal Arts and is most often taken by incoming freshmen. This population is possibly least financially prepared for the cost of the texts and other fees they encounter upon entering college and those costs are often a significant factor in the inability of a student to continue. The texts required by freshmen are also most likely to be recycled or never referred to again in the student's academic career. Many of the students at Boise State are military, whose costs are partially funded by the government, but whose resources are often late in coming during the school year putting them at particular risk of falling behind. Other student groups for whom the cost of text may be particularly challenging are CAMP students who are first generation children of migrant workers or other migrant/immigrant populations. This was the primary impetus behind the instructor's decision to develop an OER text that could be offered at no cost to the students from the first day of instruction. The search for resources and the unexpected obstacles and opportunities encountered on the development of the text is the subject of this workshop.



Case studies on the development, refinement, and implementation of OER materials; focusing on the experience of faculty members, an Instructional Designer, and/or an Instructional Technologist collaborating to make OER come together for specific classes. Problems and solutions in locating, re-mixing, and considerations in licensing of OER will be presented. Issues in accessibility and creating OER material that meet and exceed requirements for accessibility will also be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Casper

Bob Casper

Instructional Design Specialist, Boise State University - IDEA Shop
Bob Casper has been at Boise State University, in Idaho's capital, for over a decade. He currently serves a unit of the University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) called Instructional Design and Educational Assessment (IDEA Shop) as an Instructional Design Specialist wo... Read More →
avatar for Muffet Jones

Muffet Jones

Lecturer, Boise State University
I am a lecturer in art history at Boise State University. I went to NYU and Columbia University and my primary areas of study are 19th and 20th Century American Art. At BSU I teach the Introduction to Art course which fulfills a requirement for undergraduates. The OER text I a... Read More →
avatar for Michael Strickland

Michael Strickland

Language Arts Instructor, INSPIRE Connections Academy
I have taught various classes at Boise State University over the last several years. These include several semesters of children’s literature as well as two years of teaching English to 10th and 11th graders in TRIO/Upward Bound. | | Last year, I was the parent-teacher f... Read More →
avatar for Laurel Traynowicz

Laurel Traynowicz

Associate Professor, Boise State University
Dr. Laurel Traynowicz, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Communication at Boise State University. She earned the MA and PhD in Communication Research at the University of Iowa, and has served as a faculty member at Boise State, University of Arizona and Southern Illinois-Carbonda... Read More →



Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 13 - Adjunct faculty: essential participants in OER adoption and use
More than half of courses in community colleges are taught by adjunct faculty, and institutions reliance on part-time instructors is growing. Often, part-time faculty are disconnected from their institutions and can be less able to effectively support students' use of campus resources, less knowledgeable about course sequences and program maps, and have fewer opportunities to participate in campus initiatives, such as the planning and development of OER degrees.



Faculty involvement has been critical to the success of past OER projects. However, despite the efforts of individual colleges, the field has not devised scalable strategies for more deeply integrating adjunct faculty into the strategic work of community colleges. In June 2016, Achieving the Dream launched the Engaging Adjunct Faculty in the Student Success Movement initiative to better understand both the opportunities and challenges faced by community colleges working to engage part-time faculty in their institutional student success efforts.



While this initiative is just over a year old, some early findings from the six pilot colleges have emerged that may be instructive for colleges hoping to involve adjunct faculty in OER projects. During this session, the presenters will introduce ATD's OER Degree and Engaging Adjunct Faculty Initiatives, provide a rationale for engaging adjunct faculty in the development of OER degrees, and offer several possible strategies, drawn from both ATD projects, for accomplishing this.

Speakers
JI

Jon Iuzzini

Associate Director of Teaching & Learning, Achieving the Dream
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Iitiative, Achieving the Dream, Inc.
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources.Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technol... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Leaning into learning design: a Librarian's Guide to New Pedagogy
Librarians are integral change agents in education, particularly higher education. From being gatekeepers to what is in the library to the adoption of new methods of research. When it comes to Open Educational Resources, emerging research (Bueno-de-la-Fuente, Robertson, & Boon, 2012; Jensen & West, 2015) illustrate the centrality of libraries and librarian. In other words, in academia, if OER is to continue to grow, the role of the library and librarians will continue to hold significant value. Responding to diverse sets of stakeholders, librarians are challenged with teaching about teaching and instruction on instruction (Detlefsen EG, 2012). Well prepared to navigate the needs of these user groups, OER librarians require specific instruction for the specialized world of open educational resources.

In keeping with the theme of the conference (Sharing, Gratitude, and Hope), we propose to share a librarian guide to new pedagogy developed with the goal of advancing OER in the academy. The goal for this undertaking was to provide a practical guide for librarians as they traverse the landscape of open educational resources for pedagogical optimization. We aim to "share because we are grateful for what others have shared with us" in developing this guide "and we share because we hope to help to others" interested in engaging in similar projects.

Pedagogical experts agree that the communication of Learners has changes that have yet to be unveiled. Using the concept of WEB DuBois, the veil of the learner foreshadows the learning that is taking place. This presentation will identify the evolution of pedagogies with a brief history then focus on the current strategies of the learning design field. The librarians role in promoting access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks is limited only by their agency, the goal of the guide is to empower academic librarians to navigate the emerging field of OER.

Speakers
TI

Tutaleni I. Asino

Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Valencia

11:30am

Table 14 - The School Librarian's Role in the Adoption of Open Textbooks
Librarians in higher education are integral in the adoption and use of OER at their institutions.However, school librarians have a different role in the adoption process. This presentation aims to examine ongoing research on P12 schools' use of their librarians. #GoOpen schools agree to replace at least one traditional textbook with an open textbook within a year. Agreeing to participate in the initiative means the school will äóìidentify a district #GoOpen team who will work to develop a strategy for the implementation of openly-licensed educational materials, commit to replace at least one textbook with openly-licensed educational materials in the next year, and document and share their implementation processäó (#GoOpen Districts). For P12 schools the chance of locating an open textbook that meets their needs may be limited depending on the subject and level of the open textbook they are considering. Librarians are trained to locate, access, and evaluate resources; therefore, it would seem that the schools participating in this initiative would utilize their school librarians when undergoing this transition.

This presentation will report on findings based on the research questions:

(1) How many #GoOpen schools are using their school librarians in their open textbooks adopting process?

(2) How are school librarians being used in open textbook adoption process for schools participating in the #GoOpen campaign?

(3) Why are schools who are not using school librarians choosing to not include them in the open textbook adoption process?


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 15 - The hardest nut to crack: generating buy-in with your librarian colleagues
Libraries' involvement in leading and supporting open education initiatives is growing rapidly. Many librarians', however, find that their biggest obstacle to open education engagement on their campus is not faculty or administration--it's resistance from their colleagues in the library! Open education programs cannot gain the necessary traction on our campuses through the efforts of one person. How can we bring our colleagues on board, helping them see developing an open education program is more than a creating a libguide? How can we help them get past the idea that äóìthis is just one more thing I have to do?äó How can you facilitate conversations about open education, especially when you are not in a management position? This presentation will discuss strategies for generating buy in with the colleagues that aren't yet on board with open education. Attendees will gain steps to take at their local libraries. For libraries to successfully advance open education on our campuses, we need our colleagues to join us. Let's crack that nut!

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 16 - Connecter, Adviser, Creator: The Role of the Instructional Design Librarian in Campus OER Initiatives
In any affordable learning initiative there are many moving parts. There is the macro view where various campus units and departments must collaborate to market affordable learning/OER and to plan programs that facilitate faculty adoption into their courses. There is also the micro view: the technical aspects of adopting new course materials and integrating them into our learning management system, whether library-licensed content, OER, or something else altogether.

In this presentation, I will outline the skills and knowledge that facilitate my contributions to campus affordable learning initiatives as one university's Instructional Design Librarian. My background in instructional design and educational technology combined with my experience in library and information science positions me as a competent contributor to campus initiatives.

As Instructional Design Librarian at a large regional university, I work to build relationships that connect the library with the many units and departments that collaborate on our affordable learning initiative. I advise campus leaders, instructional designers, librarians, and faculty on how to navigate and evaluate their various options for affordable and open content. I answer questions on Fair Use and appropriate reuse of copyrighted instructional materials. I create online tutorials and deliver workshops on library-licensed content, OER, copyright and Creative Commons. I serve on committees to write OER-related grants and help plan campus events related to affordable learning.

The same skills and knowledge that help me advance my library's on-campus instruction and distance learning programs as Instructional Design Librarian also prove to be essential to helping our campus make progress on advancing affordable learning.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay O'Neill

Lindsay O'Neill

Instructional Design Librarian, California State University, Fullerton
I am the Instructional Design Librarian at Cal State Fullerton in southern California as well as a part-time faculty member in our Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology program. I design and develop online learning using Storyline, Captivate, and Camtasia, and... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 17 - OER 'Sustainable Learning' an effective Hands-on Workshop with Faculty
How much time does it take to effectively learn about, find and evaluate open educational resources? We found a 3 hour hands-on workshop with faculty is an effective way to promote awareness and adoption strategies within a faculty development program. We are interested in sharing the iterative design of our hands-on faculty workshop with librarians interested in advocating OERs. What has worked, what changes we have made to effectively support our faculty adopt, adapt, and author open educational resources. Basic outline of workshops; textbook conversation, creative commons, finding and evaluating OERs, leveraging library and HathiTrust, and authoring OERs with classroom activities to publishing with Humboldt State University Press.

Speakers
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 18 - Connect OER
The movement for OER in Canada and the United States has been accelerating, with numerous institutions launching initiatives to support the creation, adoption, adaptation and awareness of OER. While there are a number of successful efforts to organize networks, communities, and consortia, many activities also happen organically without visibility outside their institution.

Recognizing the need to better track and share information about the efforts institutions have taken to advance OER, SPARC developed Connect OER. This presentation will provide attendees with an opportunity to learn more about the project as well as key findings from our first Annual Connect OER Report.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. I've devoted my career to advocating for open education to benefit students — starting back when I was an undergraduate student myself frustrated with expensive textbooks in the information-rich world we live in. My ex... Read More →
avatar for Brady Yano

Brady Yano

Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC
Come chat with me about Connect OER, OpenCon, the OER Digest, libraries and student engagement!


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

An Approach to Implementing Nudging for Teachers and Students in OER Courses
Lumen's Waymaker platform provides faculty with email alerts about students who are struggling in the course. These emails provide teachers with a simple path to acting on this information. Teachers can act by sending a personal email to the student or by sending a pre-written email tailored to their particular needs.

Information was tracked to better understand faculty behavior with these email nudges, including whether they opened the email nudge or not, whether they sent a message to a student, and whether they enabled or disabled notifications for nudges. Teachers can also choose whether they would like to send a "coach" response or a "regular" response. A coach response is motivating and encouraging; a "regular" response simply relays the facts and invites the students to act.

In order to investigate the effectiveness of these nudges on student behavior and achievement, all student data was tracked as they interacted with resource pages, prior learning assessments, formative assessments, summative assessments, and instructor emails. Using observational study methodologies, we analyzed the data to determine what effect these teacher and student nudges had on student behavior and student achievement.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Bodily

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
My research focuses on xAPI and CALIPER enabled learning analytics dashboards. I am a co-founder of an open assessment company called Prendus with the purpose of increasing OER adoption.
RS

Ross Strader

Director of Learning Engineering, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Imperial

11:30am

Table 19 - Remixing OER into the LMS
We'll discuss a practical approach to discovering OER, combining it with other OER and non-OER and then delivering it to students via the LMS.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 20 - Go Open with Google Apps
Learn about the new G Suite for Education, formerly Google Apps for Education, and how it can be integrated with Open Educational Resources. We will explore the free resources provided by Google and how to harness them for use with OERs in both classroom and professional settings. With uses ranging from collaborative documents to live hangouts, the G Suite provides a number of efficient, effective, and free tools to allow students to interact locally or remotely, synchronously or asynchronously.

Speakers
avatar for Edie Erickson

Edie Erickson

Instructional Designer, Bay de Noc Community College
Hi! I'm Edie and I'm an instructional designer and adjunct instructor from Michigan's Upper Peninsula. After spending almost 10 years as a third grade teacher, I've recently begun working as an instructional designer at Bay de Noc Community College. In this role, I have worked ex... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 21 - A Pressbooks Vision for Open Textbooks
Pressbooks is an open source book publishing platform, used by a growing number of Open Textbook projects.



In this talk, Hugh McGuire, founder of Pressbooks, will talk about why Open Textbooks offer such exciting technical possibilities for Pressbooks. He'll give an overview of the Pressbooks development roadmap, with a focus on Open Textbooks-specific features.



At Pressbooks, our primary objective is to build new features and improvements to meet the needs of the open textbook publishing community, and our roadmap is evolving accordingly.



In this talk, Pressbooks founder Hugh McGuire will talk about Š—“Pressbooks as a platformŠ—, with thoughts about a long-term technical vision for Open Textbook infrastructure, including:



1. Finding and Š—“cloningŠ— openly licensed Pressbooks books

2. APIs and Š—“service layersŠ—

2. Version control and feedback to original authors

3. Accessibility

5. Improving the web book interface

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 22 - Tradeoffs when aiming for multi-platform output targets
Open Up Resources and Illustrative Mathematics have designed a middle school math curriculum, and build a custom content management system and authoring environment. The system allows for a number of output formats, including print-ready PDF, HTML, and Common Cartridge for learning management systems.



The goal in creating the system was to be able to deliver OER to districts regardless of their technology readiness. Districts who need print can get print and districts who want a digital format have several to choose from.



While this approach has been successful, there are clearly tradeoffs that have implications to the broader OER community. For one, developing a content management system (or even adapting an existing one) is a resource-intensive project. And perhaps more importantly, this multi-platform approach can muddy the capability of downstream users to revise and remix the content.

Speakers

Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 23 - Current developments of the OER World Map Project
We recently described the OER World Map as a Š—“project in its adolescenceŠ— [1], meaning that after two years of development it has reached a state, in which it starts to provide user value without having achieve full maturity yet.



One indicator of the growing acceptance of the platform is the increasing number of cooperations with other initiatives. The presentation will provide an update on several activities, which we will drive forward in 2017:



1) OERInfo: Germany started its first major OER program [2] at the end of 2016. As part of program, OER World Map participates in the generation of the Š—“Informationsstelle OERŠ—, a central information website on OER. One outcome will be a Š—“Country Map InterfaceŠ—, which shifts the focus of the platform to the national community. After successful implementation, we will provide this functionality for other countries as well.



2) Lighthouses: In preparation to UNESCO`s second OER World Congress we are planning to implement a Š—“lighthouse functionŠ— [3], which will allow users to like initiatives, which have proven to provide sustainable value. By doing so it will be possible to identify good practise examples, which can serve as role models for countries or institutions new to OER.



3) Cooperation with OEC: One of our current projects partnering the Open Education Consortium is to use the OER World Map as a tool to support ongoing OEC activity like the Year of Open, a CCCOER members map and Open Education Week. During the course of the project, automatic data import as well as the display of World Map elements in OEC websites will be refined and extended.



The presentation will also give an overview of the roadmap of its way to Š—“grow upŠ— in the near future!



[1] http://www.slideshare.net/JanNeumann4/oer-world-map-adolescence-of-a-community-platform

[2] https://oerworldmap.org/resource/urn:uuid:3f11cdbd-a74a-4aa4-83b3-b4148bfdbe82

[3] https://github.com/hbz/oerworldmap/issues/1128

Speakers
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 24 - OA Family and Community Engagement Curriculum for Higher Ed Teacher Prep Programs
Instructor-facing curriculum known as the "Framework for Community Embeddedness in Teacher Preparation" is a series of digitally-accessed instructional modules for university instructors to be embed into teacher prep coursework and clinical experiences. The modules' curriculum is designed to provide student teachers opportunities to engage with community members and families through a parent/teacher candidate home visit, and a series of community-based activities designed to make teacher candidates aware of the resources and support services available to them and the children and families they serve.



The framework and accompanying modules provide teacher preparation faculty with a series of intentional, systematic, instructional plans that facilitate TCs learning about communities, schools, families, and students while examining their own practice and its effects on student learning. Each module is framed using an inquiry framework, which asks student teachers to investigate local knowledge that is contextualized, relevant, and meaningful in the environment in which their students live and learn for the purpose of partnering with families and communities to promote the growth and development of the children they serve.



The ultimate goal is to widely share these modules with other teacher preparation programs at ASU and other institutions of higher education at no cost and with no restricted access.

Speakers
avatar for Lori Ellingford

Lori Ellingford

Director, iTeachAZ Community Embeddedness Project, Arizona State University, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 25 - Where the Wild Things Are: Virtually Open Education
The potential uses of virtual reality (VR) technology in education are boundless. Yet, there is almost no substantial research on best practices for developing VR for education nor on virtual reality open educational resources (VROERs). In this presentation, we overview cutting-edge open education practices using VR. We introduce our openly-licensed 3D spatial environment of British Columbia's Stanley Park. This 3D spatial environment is a first of its kind, experimental VROER developed at the University of British Columbia (UBC) by a collaborative group of geography faculty, UBC Studios filmmakers, digital media writers, professional VR developers (MetanautVR), and over a dozen undergraduate student researchers and developers. In 2016, a seed grant from BCCampus allowed our team to start experimenting with photogrammetry, drones, and open source software (scuh as Unity) to make and use VROERs. The aims of our team included creating VROER to overcome the the financial and logistic barriers to accessing field trip locations, leverage the imaginative potential of VR experiences to enhance learning gains, establishing best practices for VROER development, and developing VROER as part of an open pedagogy process. We will walk you through our challenges, successes, and lessons learned. We believe that VR is not simply another edtech fetish, but rather the basis of a revolutionary medium that learners and educators must begin to explore. The potential experiences we can create allow learners to transcend physical principles and traverse geography, scale, and temporal periods. Moreover, this exploration and playing where the wild things are, allows us to establish openly licensed content as a fundamental part of VR for education - a VROER ecosystem that encourages collaboration and focus on learning outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Gill Green

Arthur Gill Green

Professor, UBC
I work on property rights, GIScience, and Open Pedagogy. Three very different areas that have come to be symbiotic in my research and work. Would love to talk to fans of QGIS, people working on property rights, or people attempting to integrate open educational practices in their... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 26 - The OER Media Landscape and Our Collective Communications Imperative
OER is no longer a new movement - the media are now paying real attention. As awareness of OER continues to gain traction around the U.S. - and the world - journalists and the audiences they influence are trying to understand the benefits, complexities and nuances of this groundbreaking system for creating and using teaching and learning materials.



Join us for a high-level view of the news coverage around OER, in both trade and mainstream publications, to learn key findings about how reporters are covering the movement. In this session, we will unpack the methodology and learnings from a comprehensive media analysis to answer key questions, including which publications are covering OER, how reporters are framing their stories and defining OER, the sources they are using, and any inaccuracies that they may be spreading.



Learn how the findings from our media analysis provide concrete lessons on what it means for communications work in the OER field. Where are the opportunities for stakeholders from the OER community to engage with and influence reporters? Where are the possible threats to the movement, and how do we respond quickly to correct misinformation?



The media has proven receptive to voices from within the OER community, but has also been vulnerable to messaging from unfriendly stakeholders attempting to co-opt the definition of OER to serve their interests. That's why now is the time for the movement to solidify and amplify the definition and story of OER--at the heart of which is the many benefits that it offers to all students.

Join the conversation to understand how we can win more champions on behalf of OER.

Speakers
TH

Tanja Hester

Senior Vice President, GMMB


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 27 - Copyright Questions: Incorporating 3rd Party Quotations, Illustrations, and more into OER
As the demand for OER increases and states and districts work to create new OER, there are growing questions about how and when 3rd party materials can be incorporated into OER. Many subjects are difficult or impossible to teach without including quotations, illustrations and other third party materials in education and evaluation materials. This presentation will highlight examples of these uses and discuss how to understand when fair use, or other limitations to copyright law permit these uses.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Jacob

Meredith Jacob

Public Lead, Creative Commons USA
I work at American University Washington College of Law - at the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property - pijip.org. We're also the home of Creative Commons United States - the US Creative Commons Affiliate. I'm interested in public interest intellectual prope... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

Open Educational Resources Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

12:00pm

Unconference Orientation
Speakers
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent the last 19 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my c... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Royal Ballroom

12:35pm

Unconference Time
Thursday October 12, 2017 12:35pm - 4:35pm
Royal Ballroom

2:00pm

MyOpenMath Workshop
Speakers
JT

Justin Tolentino

Assistant Professor, Santa Ana College


Thursday October 12, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Terrace A - C

8:00pm

OpenEd Jam Session
Come make live music with your OpenEd colleagues! Join the OpenEd Jam Session to be part of our live, unrehearsed - and yet somehow not terrible - band. And if you don't play an instrument or consider yourself a singer, come spend an evening relaxing and listening to live music. 

The OpenEd conference provides a set of basic band instruments - drum kit, guitars, bass, keyboard, and microphones. You're encouraged to bring additional instruments - like a saxophone, trumpet, clarinet, harmonica, triangle, or cowbell - with you to the conference. Check this Google Doc to suggest a song or sign up to play an instrument:

http://bit.ly/opened17jamsesh

If necessary, please be sure to bring your phone or tablet so you'll be able to see the music for the songs we'll play!

This is one of the most fun parts of the conference - we hope to see you there!

Here's some video from the original OpenEd12 Jam Session to whet your appetite...

Thursday October 12, 2017 8:00pm - 11:00pm
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom
 
Friday, October 13
 

8:30am

Keynote Address: David Bollier
Speakers
DB

David Bollier

Co-Founder, Commons Strategies Group


Friday October 13, 2017 8:30am - 9:15am
Royal Ballroom

9:15am

Keynote Address: Cathy Casserly
Speakers
avatar for Cathy Casserly

Cathy Casserly

Catalyst at Nexus of Learning, Leadership & the Future, Hewlett/ Institute for the Future
Catherine M. Casserly, Ph.D. is a pracademic, working at the nexus of research and practice as a catalyst for openness, innovation and leadership. Casserly works with a portfolio of education organizations with a passion for learning eco-systems that support high quality educatio... Read More →


Friday October 13, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Royal Ballroom

10:00am

Break
Friday October 13, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Royal Ballroom

10:30am

Connecticut's Open Math Program
Sparked by three innovative faculty members, rising student advocacy, and a supportive legislature, the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System implemented a grant program to support the adoption of OER including MyOpenMath to reduce the cost of current commercial textbook & homework site solutions being implemented in 100 level Math courses across the 17 institution system. This session will review the selfless work of three community college instructors, the role of student advocacy and a legislative OER Task Force on the creation of the Open Math Grant program and the results of those efforts to date.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Corcoran

Kevin Corcoran

Executive Director, Connecticut Distance Learning Consortium
OER efforts in Connecticut and throughout the Northeast


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

10:30am

Moving from Affordable to Open: Struggles and Successes
Moving from a focus on saving students money on textbooks to a system that supports open pedagogy and innovative approaches to education is challenging and rewarding. In 2016, our campus renewed its focus on creating a more affordable learning experience through reducing the cost of textbooks. The first steps of this effort occurred with minimal work. Faculty were eager to join the project. In some cases, the mere act of showing faculty the cost of their textbooks was enough to get them to investigate new options. For others, conversations with peers or students did the trick. In one semester, we were able to get a commitment from faculty to save the students over $73,000.

As we moved towards this goal, we learned that much more can be gained if we go beyond affordable and dive into the benefits of open. We learned by focusing on OER and open pedagogy, that we not only can save students money, but also enhance their overall learning experience via improved digital literacy and increased classroom engagement. Our pivot proved to be the easy step. New challenges arose when we removed the concept and structure of the well loved textbook from our message.

Our team has landed on a approach that supports those that are ready to reduce cost, while also encouraging faculty that are ready to explore concepts of open. During this presentation, we will share our approach and ideas for how we are helping faculty move from affordable to open.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Leafstedt

Jill Leafstedt

Executive Director Teaching & Learning Innovations, CSU Channel Islands


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Barcelona

10:30am

The Digital Polarization Initiative: An Open Pedagogy Project for a Post-Truth World
The Digital Polarization Initiative, or DigiPo , is an attempt to build student web literacy by having students participating in a broad, cross-institutional project to fact-check, annotate, and provide context to the different news stories that show up in our Twitter and Facebook feeds. The effort is spearheaded by Mike Caulfield.

As a project that pushes students and faculty from a dozen different institutions into a single wiki community it forms a potential model for future cross-institutional open pedagogy work. As a project that focuses on the problems of our current "post-truth" moment, it shows ways in which open pedagogy -- the student and faculty production of openly licensed and published materials -- addresses concerns in ways that traditional pedagogy cannot.

Mike Caulfield will discuss the aims of the project, some of the sticking points of implementation, as well as how the pedagogy carries forward the best ideas of past open pedagogy projects to meet new challenges. Early assessments of the effort will be shared.

Spoiler alert: he will also attempt to recruit your class into the project. You have been warned.

Speakers
MC

Mike Caulfield

Director of Blended and Networked Learning, Washington State University


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Valencia

10:30am

Going Beyond Access: Can Cognitive Science Improve Student Learning of OER?
Since the inception of OER, the overwhelming focus has been on improving student access to educational materials. However, access to materials is only one piece of the educational puzzleäóîstudents still need to learn that information. Fortunately, research in cognitive science offers empirically validated techniques for improving learning. OER providers are uniquely positioned to improve learning by integrating these findings into their materials.

Over the last two years, we have been working to implement cognitive science principles into OpenStax textbooks. One such principle is retrieval practice. Retrieval practice refers to the act of recalling learned information from memory as part of the learning process (e.g., Answering practice questions). An overwhelming number of laboratory and classroom studies have found that practicing retrieval improves learning of text materialsäóîeven more than standard study strategies such as repeated rereading and concept mapping (Karpicke & Grimaldi, 2012).

Implementing retrieval practice within OER appears to be relatively straightforwardäóîsimply ensure that learning materials include practice questions for students to use. Indeed, including practice questions at the end of chapters within textbooks is standard practice. However, results from our early studies suggest that simply offering retrieval practice opportunities is not sufficient. First, students did not utilize the retrieval practice opportunity unless there was a grade incentive to do so. Second, students who answered the questions often engaged in maladaptive behaviors. For example, many students entered garbage responses in order to receive participation points or view the correct answer. Despite these challenges, students who properly utilized the retrieval opportunities saw improved learning outcomes. Thus, integration of cognitive science into OER appears to be a promising avenue for improving student learning, but there are significant challenges to consider.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Baraniuk

Richard Baraniuk

Victor E Cameron Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University
Richard G. Baraniuk is the Victor E. Cameron Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University and the founder and director of OpenStax. In 1999, Dr. Baraniuk launched Connexions (now OpenStax CNX), one of the world’s first and today one of the world’s largest &ldquo... Read More →
avatar for Debshila Basu Mallick

Debshila Basu Mallick

Postdoctoral researcher, OpenStax, Rice University


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Terrace A - C

10:30am

Students' Perceptions of Faculty Who Use Open Vs. Copyrighted Textbooks: An Exploratory Study
Research indicates students find open materials favorable, but there is no research regarding students' perceptions of the faculty who use open materials. In this small exploratory study, we examined college students' perceptions of faculty members based on their textbook use. Twenty-three participants read two passages--one about an instructor using an open textbook and another using a traditional copyrighted textbook--and rated each instructor on a range of characteristics through closed- and open-ended questions. Participants rated each professor on the characteristics of kindness, knowledgeability about their subject matter, enthusiasm, patience, encouragement, and creativity on a scale from 1 (a lot/very) to 5 (not at all). Participants also rated how likely they were to take a course with each professor, also on a scale of 1 (very likely) to 5 (very unlikely). Open-ended questions asked for justifications for each closed-ended response (On what basis did you make your judgment? ). T-test results showed that participants rated the faculty member using an open textbook as having higher levels of kindness, encouragement, and creativity than the faculty member using a traditional copyrighted textbook, and were more likely to want to take a class with the faculty member using an open textbook. Participants frequently cited personal characteristics, teaching styles, and textbook cost as positive characteristics of faculty who used open textbooks. Although a small study, these findings suggest that students find value in professors who use open materials, as it may reflect personal qualities, such as kindness and creativity, that students believe these professors possess. Limitations and future directions, including a larger sample size, different passages, and improved research method approaches, will be discussed, as well as the additional implications these research findings have on open textbook use in college classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Grissett

Judy Grissett

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgia Southwestern State University


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Imperial

10:30am

UN Sustainable Development Goals + OER + OEP
The world's nations have adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and committed to 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs

This session will explore how and why the global open education community can and should work with their national governments to mainstream open educational resources (OER) and open education practices (OEP) in support of solving the SDGs, our collective global grand challenges.

Why connect OER and OEP to the SDGs? (1) OER can be the education resources to teach the public about and are continuously updated by working on SDGs. (2) It would connect education institutions, educators and students to solving SDGs; forming a new, positive connection between governments and their public education systems. (3) Global challenges / SDGs are constantly changing and OER and OEP can be updated in real time. (4) As learning spaces shift to OEP, students can contribute to improving the open curriculum, work on complex and authentic SDG challenges, and have their work be used in their fields. (5) As working on SDGs is meaningful and the stakes are high (e.g., climate action, zero hunger, gender equality, no poverty, etc.), students are motivated to work smarter, learn more deeply, have an opportunity to contribute to society – by producing, revising, and sharing OER about SDGs - while they earn their degree.

I recently explored the OER + SDG4 connection at UNESCO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvfC8A1oW30 and I look forward to working with Open Education Conference participants to explore these ideas and opportunities more deeply.

Speakers
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Slides: https://www.slideshare.net/cgreen/open-education-un-sustainable-development-goals | | | Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significant... Read More →


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Madrid

10:30am

When the Unicorn Breaks A Leg: Using the CCCOER Community of Practice to Meet Challenges in Open Education
Open Education is somewhat “mythic" for many institutions, and our collaborative network has been helping to demystify challenges related to open education for a decade. As one of our central leaders at CCCOER points out, when your unicorn breaks a leg, you to need to grow some wings and become a pegasus. The CCCOER Community of Practice is a collaboration of institutions and OE Practitioners who support one another in learning about, planning for, and sustaining open education adoption to scale. Our goals are to inspire new leaders in open education while nurturing our longer-term members in their efforts to bring open education to the next level at their institutions. One major theme in our network is addressing challenges related to large-scale adoption of open education. During this panel new and long-term leaders in our organization will demonstrate how we work together to build capacity in addressing challenges to success in scaling open education projects.

Bring a favorite challenge to this session and see how the community can help you look at different ways to approach and successfully resolve.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER)
Open Education at Community Colleges
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER Project Manager, Lansing Community College
I'm a librarian and the OER Project Manager at Lansing Community College. I would love to talk to you about your OER projects and how it has impacted student learning and faculty's teaching in your campuses. I'm also one of the Open Education Group Research Fellow for 2017-2018... Read More →
avatar for Wm. Preston James

Wm. Preston James

Director, Northern Virginia Community College
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initia... Read More →
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. | | I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate in... Read More →


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 11:25am
Terrace D - F

10:30am

A Peep at the Geneseo Circus: Publishing, Program Development, and SUNY System Management on One Campus
This panel discussion will showcase the multi-faceted approach to expanding access and programmatic support of OER both locally and statewide. Ben Rawlins, Milne Library Director, will discuss communication and providing strategic support for OER service in the library and across campus.

Alexis Clifton, Executive Director of SUNY OER Services (SOS), will showcase efforts of coordination across the system's 64 community colleges and universities. SOS is utilizing a cohort model to build upon the existing expertise and share best practices. SOS offers virtual and in-person training, access to a digital publishing platform, data collection, and mentorship for individual campus needs in the development of sustainable OER adoption.

Allison Brown, Digital Project Services Manager, will talk about the transition of Open SUNY Textbooks to a service model, and how the growing and varied publishing projects out of Geneseo complement SUNY OER Services.

The presenters will show how this coordinated-effort approach has led to the successful development of an OER initiative at Geneseo and the SUNY system more broadly. We invite conversation with audience members around what Geneseo's model might offer other states and campuses looking to coordinate services.

Speakers
avatar for Allison Brown

Allison Brown

Digital Publishing Services Manager, SUNY Geneseo
avatar for Alexis Clifton

Alexis Clifton

Executive Director, SUNY OER Services
avatar for Ben Rawlins

Ben Rawlins

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 11:25am
Royal C - F

10:30am

The Rise of the Automatic Purchasing Program
It should come as no surprise that textbook affordability is a major gripe for students pursuing higher education. In recognition of this, there is growing interest in adopting programs that ensure students have immediate access to discounted, publisher produced course materials. While the names of all inclusive courseware models vary across higher education institutions, (eTexts, Include-Ed, U-Read, etc.) the general framework behind each remains the same.

This panel will explore the structure of the inclusive access model and its implications to the stakeholder groups they represent. With Pearson having announced that over 1,200 campus bookstores were piloting these models in fall 2016 alone, this timely discussion will leave attendees more aware of the implications of adopting these models. Attendees will also have a greater understanding of how this model compares to alternatives in the textbook market.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. I've devoted my career to advocating for open education to benefit students — starting back when I was an undergraduate student myself frustrated with expensive textbooks in the information-rich world we live in. My ex... Read More →
avatar for Robert Butterfield

Robert Butterfield

Director, Instructional Resources, University of Wisconsin-Stout
I am the Director of Instructional Resources for the University of Wisconsin-Stout. Instructional Resources provides print textbook rentals, e-texts, access codes and other resources in support of our curriculum supported by student fees. We also operate the campus OER program... Read More →
avatar for Cheryl Cuillier

Cheryl Cuillier

OER Coordinator, University of Arizona Libraries
I lead the Libraries' open educational resource (OER) initiatives.
avatar for Manuela Ekowo

Manuela Ekowo

Policy Analyst, New America
Manuela Ekowo is a policy analyst with the Education Policy program at New America. She provides research and analysis on policies related to higher education including innovations in higher education delivery, the use of technology, open educational resources (OER), and ensuring... Read More →
avatar for Katie Steen

Katie Steen

Open Education Fellow, SPARC
avatar for Kaitlyn Vitez

Kaitlyn Vitez

Higher Education Advocate, U.S. PIRG
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, OpenStax, Rice University
Daniel Williamson manages the day to day operations of OpenStax, using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination. A Rice University graduate, and passionate advocate of equity in educat... Read More →
avatar for Brady Yano

Brady Yano

Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC
Come chat with me about Connect OER, OpenCon, the OER Digest, libraries and student engagement!


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 11:25am
Grenada

11:00am

OER Ambassadors: Empowering Faculty to Support Faculty in the Adoption of OER
As a university with a deep commitment to social justice, SF State is striving to reduce the cost of course materials to students by encouraging greater use of OER on our campus. One of the challenges we face as we seek to promote adoption of OER has been how best to reach and support faculty in this process.

Most OER projects implemented on our campus to date have been faculty driven. Based on the diversity of projects put forth by these early adopters, we realized that there would be no one size fits all model of support. We needed to find a way to empower these early adopting faculty, who best know the needs and challenges of OER adoption within their disciplines, to communicate the value of OER other faculty and to support in the OER process. Our OER faculty ambassador program attempts to fill this support gap.

Additionally, because choice of instructional materials is considered a crucial part of academic freedom at SF State, a key aspect of reaching faculty has been conveying the value of OER adoption: to students, to our campus and to the faculty themselves. By arming faculty ambassadors with data, support materials, best practices and more, they are able take ownership over OER advocacy and reach faculty who might otherwise not become part of the conversation.

This session explores the terrain of providing support for faculty in adopting OER, and describes how SF State's OER team developed an ambassador program that cultivated faculty ownership of advancement of OER on our campus. Presenters will describe the collaboration between faculty ambassadors and instructional designers in planning and customizing each ambassador's model of support. Presenters will also report progress of ambassador led projects that are currently underway, including successes, challenges and lessons learned.

Speakers
GD

Gavin Deare

Lecturer, Business Communications, San Francisco State University
avatar for Heidi Fridriksson

Heidi Fridriksson

Instructional Designer, San Francisco State University
Heidi is an instructional designer with Academic Technology at San Francisco State University. She is also one of the OER coordinators working with faculty to drive OER adoption at SF State.


Friday October 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal A - B 18-20 Lisle St London, WC2H 7BA, United Kingdom

11:00am

On-Ramps, Packages, & Widgets: From Textbooks to Open Pedagogy
The LCC Open Learn Lab is a domains-of-one's-own project in a community college aimed at supporting the 5 R's and open ed practices. DoOO at teaching-oriented schools such as CC's (as opposed to research/grad uni's) face particular challenges. Faculty are so teaching focused and so not-research focused, that pitches about creating own scholarly identity or authoring your own stuff aren't effective. In addit