Loading…
OpenEd17: The 14th Annual Open Education Conference
October 11 – 13, 2017  ::  Anaheim, CA

Return to the Conference Website 



Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Open Pedagogy and Open Educational Practices [clear filter]
Wednesday, October 11
 

10:30am

Moving Beyond OER to OEP: Incorporating Learner-Generated Content into a Non-Traditional Textbook that Responds to the Learning Styles of Today's Students
Tired of using a traditional textbook in my Legal and Ethical Environment of Business course that some students did not purchase and more did not read, I began developing a digital textbook that I have now used in eight sections of the course in the past four semesters. In addition to some original content, the e-book currently has more than 700 links to online readings, videos, websites, and other free open-source web materials that appeal to the learning styles and preferences of today's college students and allows them to personalize their learning. The format and content of the book encourage students to be more self-directed, as it requires them to determine which links to review as they attempt to master the material. To add more interactive content to the book, I have assigned students to create study aids, exercises and assessment tools, as well as Infographics that visually summarize course content. With their permission, I have begun embedding this student work into the book for all users, transforming the initial OER project and moving to a format more aligned with Open Educational Practices. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the e-book and why we selected this format instead of simply adopting an existing OER textbook. While demonstrating the book, I will also show attendees assignments produced by students and embedded in the text, before sharing student feedback on how creating and using these course materials has enhanced their learning experience.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Salloom

Zoe Salloom

Instructional Design, Georgia State University
SW

Susan Willey

Georgia State University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Valencia

11:00am

OEP Loading...: Considering Open Pedagogy in Practice
What does open pedagogy look like in practice? Using open pedagogy to frame the discussion, presenters will share how they have designed their courses, Introduction to Sociology and Introduction to Literature, to create meaningful, engaging open learning opportunities for their students. The presenters will share reflections and insights gained from their teaching experiences as well as examples of open practices enabled by Open Educational Resources.

Speakers

Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Valencia

11:30am

Teaching Naked Behind Bars: Exploring the Empowerment of Needs-Based, Technologically Fluid, Open-Education Course Development in Prisons
Course development, teaching, and dissemination of academic materials is nothing if not unpredictable when it is executed in a College Prison Program. Around the country, each prison has different rules and every warden and state offer varying levels of support towards the idea of educating individuals who have been convicted of a felony. Lockdowns, funding controversies, access to textbooks outside of class, limited to no access to technology and micro-managing of time can all influence the type of education and assessment that is possible in the development of a college level course in a prison setting. This presentation explores the pedagogical process of building a college course in Sociology that is not only accessible to Prison Inmates but highly-relevant to their specific experiences and, works within the extremely regimented needs of the Prison. Based on the values of accessible education, a pedagogy of inclusivity and a theory of intersectionality, this author will explore ways in which we can compile an archive of sociological and educational materials pertinent to the realities of incarceration. By providing students materials that are relevant to their world and their needs we can create an educational experience that truly empowers students to cultivate their minds; even within a system when all other power in their lives has been muted.

Speakers
ZM

Zendina Mostert Mostert

Assistant Professor, Sociology, Salt Lake Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Valencia

1:00pm

Fake It Til You Make It: OER and Media Literacy in the Classroom
Today's fake news crisis and its connection to media literacy offers an opportunity to explore the concept of open pedagogy. In November 2016, at the height of the election season and in the midst of a national conversation on validity in media, the Stanford History Education Group released a report describing the capacity of students to appropriately interpret digital media. The results indicated an astounding lack of proficiency among students at all levels - far beyond what researchers anticipated. Overall, students in K-12 and higher education may be graduating without the capacity to properly evaluate digital sources of information.

With the rapid growth of digital media as an integral component of communication, students need explicit instruction in media literacy skills. However, institutions of higher education have not determined the means to provide this instruction, and the subject remains unattached to any specific discipline. At the same time, public faith in universities and colleges has dwindled, resulting in calls for educational reform. Students' difficulty in effectively navigating society's digital landscape may add to public concern that higher education isn't doing its job well.

In order to reinstill public faith, academia must embrace a focus on student learning and evidence-based pedagogical practice. An open approach to pedagogy may help the academy answer the public's call for reform. Openness has sustained innovations in the past such as the proliferation of innovations including scientific journals in the 16th century and the world wide web more recently.

Schmidt (2015) has recommended an interdisciplinary approach to media literacy instruction through the integration of brief media literacy tutorials embedded within the content lessons of various courses. In this brief session, three professors will discuss their pedagogical experiences integrating media literacy and OER into instruction.

Speakers
MG

Megan Gooding

Associate Professor of History, Odessa College
avatar for Mystic Jordan

Mystic Jordan

Chair of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Odessa College
DR

Daniel Regalado

History/Govt Faculty, Odessa College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Valencia

1:30pm

Complementary and Necessarily Bundled: Leveraging Partnerships to Bring Open Pedagogy to Scale
Open pedagogy is the future of open education because of the potential for an educational community to engage in the creation of the next generation of content while improving student learning. However, building open pedagogy to scale at most institutions has proven difficult, partially because of customized learning experiences and partially because of lack of faculty knowledge about how to support open pedagogy assignments. One way to increase adoption of open pedagogy is to leverage the existing infrastructure and institutional awareness around information literacy. The similarities in goals between open pedagogy and information literacy work represents a natural partnership that open practitioners can draw upon to support the increased adoption of both information-rich and renewable assignments in the curriculum. Panelists in this session will discuss a librarian's perspective on building programmatic support for open pedagogical practice, similar to how libraries have built programmatic support for information literacy. With a focus on scholarship of teaching and learning and open educational practices, we'll demonstrate how the work of open education practitioners and librarians is both complementary and necessarily bundled. When our professional, ethical, and teaching practices are united, open pedagogy can be better organized to scale.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Faye Cohen

Sarah Faye Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Amy Hofer

Amy Hofer

Statewide Coordinator, Open Oregon Educational Resources
Amy Hofer, Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library Services, is the OER librarian for Oregon's 24 community colleges and universities. You can visit the Open Oregon Educational Resources website at openoregon.org. By night she is a fiddler and square dance caller.
avatar for Michelle Reed

Michelle Reed

Open Education Librarian, University of Texas at Arlington
I lead efforts to support the adoption, adaptation, and creation of OER and advocate for the creation of experiential learning opportunities that foster collaboration, increase engagement, and empower students as content creators. Additionally, I’m a 2017-18 OER Research Fellow... Read More →
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 1:30pm - 2:25pm
Valencia

3:30pm

Perceived Effects of Open Textbook Usage on Secondary Science Classroom Practice
Open Educational Resources (OER) provide openly licensed alternatives to commercial instructional materials. Proponents of K-12 OER suggest that their benefits include cost savings, increased access, improved quality, and increased teacher professionalism or empowerment. While the small body of K-12 OER research is growing, perceived benefits of K-12 OER usage have not yet been thoroughly proven. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand whether certain potential benefits were being realized by a group of secondary teachers using open science textbooks. In surveys and interviews, teachers were asked to describe their classroom practice before and after adopting an open textbook, including practices relating to openness. Teachers were also asked to rate the quality of the open textbooks they were using and textbooks used previously. Early analysis suggests that while teachers appreciated the flexibility and low cost of their open textbooks, adoption of open textbooks did not greatly impact classroom practice, nor promote open practice. The researcher will present findings from the study and lead a discussion about the implications for educators, researchers, and the future of open textbooks.

Speakers
SM

Stacie Mason

Brigham Young University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Valencia

4:00pm

Yes We Can! OER Science Labs with Regional Flare
Developers of OER courses in the sciences are challenged by how to provide relevant, open laboratory content to students. The presenter will share how he overcame that challenge by creating a fully online OER version of BIO 100IN- Biological Concepts. He will share how he first altered an Open Stax textbook to include regional content, and how he created a series of open labs where students utilize common household items and processes to conduct in-home experiments. BIO 100IN is one course in the online, OER AA Liberal Arts degree pathway PCC faculty and staff are completing as an Achieving the Dream grantee.

Speakers
JK

Janice Kempster

Dean of Distance Education, Pima Community College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Valencia
 
Thursday, October 12
 

11:00am

Table 2 - Embracing a Continuum of Openness: Faculty Perspectives Designing and Delivering a Graduate Program with Openness as Core Value
This presentation will share findings from a research study being conducted on the experience of faculty as they redesign a graduate program in Learning and Technology that has openness as a key design principle. Openness was adopted as a program goal predicated on the philosophical stance that openness and open educational practices facilitate collaboration and cultivate networked learning in its many forms as necessitated by the digital age. The graduate program under study prepares students to design, create, implement and evaluate contemporary digital learning environments that many may not have experienced themselves. By adopting openness as a key design principle, the program presents a model of a contemporary digital learning environment in the context of post-secondary education.

This research examines the faculty experience designing a graduate program along a continuum of openness at a post-secondary institution defined by a blended learning delivery model that to date has no formal institutional open education strategy or open policy in place. Initial findings of how embodying this view of openness impacted the experience of faculty in designing for, and facilitating in, these more open learning spaces will be shared. Research themes such as: the complexity of defining openness within the bounds of a graduate program; alignment between openness and an institutional learning and teaching model; faculty level of risk and comfort and, the impact on course design and delivery will be discussed. Examples of ways in which the 5 R's of openness: retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute (Wiley, 2014) have been applied at program and course level will be shared. Ways in which faculty perceive the digital learning environments they have created with respect to the spectrum of networked and open practices outlined by Paskevicius & Forssman (2017) will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
GV

George Veletsianos

Royal Roads University


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 3 - Walking the Walk for Open Pedagogy: Community Design of a Shared Open Educational Resource about Scholarly Communication for Librarians and Learners
Librarians have become a major stakeholder in the open education movement. However, many of the courses in which we are taught our craft are still bound by traditional commercial texts. The open, collaborative nature of OER lends them a unique ability to support community-driven learning and sharing, making them an ideal venue for introducing new learners to a dynamic, aspirational field like scholarly communication. Librarians from three institutions - Kansas, Illinois, and NC State - are developing an OER for training librarians and other learners about what scholarly communication librarianship is and what it has the potential to be.



This presentation describes our work developing a collaborative, community-driven, dynamic OER for introducing students and practitioners to scholarly communication. An open resource is critical to this approach because scholarly communication has a multiplicity of contexts and meanings so institutions, instructors, and learner need to be able tell their own stories. Openness creates a space in which voices historically excluded from presumed Š—“authorityŠ— can influence and even own the narrative, contributing stories which are inspirational and grounded in experiences often left out of traditional textbooks. Join us for an overview of a dynamic new OER project and an exploration of the transformative potential of open pedagogy in librarianship and scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Kansas
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education programming at the University of Kansas. I'm a presenter for the Open Textbook Network and an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Ask me about the IMLS Grant I'm pursuing with Will Cross... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, NCSU Libraries
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 4 - Six Key Design Considerations for Leveraging Open in Public Safety Education
The Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) is Canada's leading public safety educator. With 3 schools, 13 divisions and 45 programs, JIBC educates and trains public safety officials ranging from frontline social workers to police officers. Our students are lifelong learners who have numerous points of entry or return to our institution. Learners may enter our programs before employment, as part of their training once employed in the public safety sector or for continuing education and further professional accreditation. Our programs are truly integrated with our frontline worker and first responder communities where we work closely with them to design, develop and delivery our learning. For over five years, JIBC has used our unique student trajectory to design and implement open solutions for course delivery and life-long learning resources.



Open courses and resources are a valuable and practical solution to the numerous training issues and problems that arise when working with in the public safety sector. For example, rather than exclusively looking at learners who are currently in our programs, we look at designing for the long-term. An open resource website that allows policing students to access the legal elements of common criminal offences will also greatly benefit them when they are on the police force. Open design allows us to consider and explore the application of the resource inside and outside of the classroom.



In this session, using the JIBC student trajectory, we'll look at six key design considerations for open within the context of public safety post-secondary education, including:



1. Frequently changing regulations, standards and legislation

2. Widely-distributed learners

3. Mobile accessibility of resources

4. Sensitive material

5. Reducing costs to students

6. Reducing development cost

Speakers
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
Senior Instructional Designer, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC)


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:00am

Table 5 - OER-Enabled Pedagogy
Over the past decade, the term Š—“Open Educational ResourcesŠ— has become clearly defined, in part by the 5Rs. In recent years the two terms Š—“Open Educational PracticesŠ— and Š—“Open PedagogyŠ— have been used in various ways, including as synonyms. In this presentation we propose distinctive definitions for these terms and provide examples of each.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Research... Read More →
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent over 20 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my colleagues... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 2 - Embracing a Continuum of Openness: Faculty Perspectives Designing and Delivering a Graduate Program with Openness as Core Value
This presentation will share findings from a research study being conducted on the experience of faculty as they redesign a graduate program in Learning and Technology that has openness as a key design principle. Openness was adopted as a program goal predicated on the philosophical stance that openness and open educational practices facilitate collaboration and cultivate networked learning in its many forms as necessitated by the digital age. The graduate program under study prepares students to design, create, implement and evaluate contemporary digital learning environments that many may not have experienced themselves. By adopting openness as a key design principle, the program presents a model of a contemporary digital learning environment in the context of post-secondary education.

This research examines the faculty experience designing a graduate program along a continuum of openness at a post-secondary institution defined by a blended learning delivery model that to date has no formal institutional open education strategy or open policy in place. Initial findings of how embodying this view of openness impacted the experience of faculty in designing for, and facilitating in, these more open learning spaces will be shared. Research themes such as: the complexity of defining openness within the bounds of a graduate program; alignment between openness and an institutional learning and teaching model; faculty level of risk and comfort and, the impact on course design and delivery will be discussed. Examples of ways in which the 5 R's of openness: retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute (Wiley, 2014) have been applied at program and course level will be shared. Ways in which faculty perceive the digital learning environments they have created with respect to the spectrum of networked and open practices outlined by Paskevicius & Forssman (2017) will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
GV

George Veletsianos

Royal Roads University


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 3 - Walking the Walk for Open Pedagogy: Community Design of a Shared Open Educational Resource about Scholarly Communication for Librarians and Learners
Librarians have become a major stakeholder in the open education movement. However, many of the courses in which we are taught our craft are still bound by traditional commercial texts. The open, collaborative nature of OER lends them a unique ability to support community-driven learning and sharing, making them an ideal venue for introducing new learners to a dynamic, aspirational field like scholarly communication. Librarians from three institutions - Kansas, Illinois, and NC State - are developing an OER for training librarians and other learners about what scholarly communication librarianship is and what it has the potential to be.



This presentation describes our work developing a collaborative, community-driven, dynamic OER for introducing students and practitioners to scholarly communication. An open resource is critical to this approach because scholarly communication has a multiplicity of contexts and meanings so institutions, instructors, and learner need to be able tell their own stories. Openness creates a space in which voices historically excluded from presumed Š—“authorityŠ— can influence and even own the narrative, contributing stories which are inspirational and grounded in experiences often left out of traditional textbooks. Join us for an overview of a dynamic new OER project and an exploration of the transformative potential of open pedagogy in librarianship and scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Kansas
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education programming at the University of Kansas. I'm a presenter for the Open Textbook Network and an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Ask me about the IMLS Grant I'm pursuing with Will Cross... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, NCSU Libraries
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 4 - Six Key Design Considerations for Leveraging Open in Public Safety Education
The Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) is Canada's leading public safety educator. With 3 schools, 13 divisions and 45 programs, JIBC educates and trains public safety officials ranging from frontline social workers to police officers. Our students are lifelong learners who have numerous points of entry or return to our institution. Learners may enter our programs before employment, as part of their training once employed in the public safety sector or for continuing education and further professional accreditation. Our programs are truly integrated with our frontline worker and first responder communities where we work closely with them to design, develop and delivery our learning. For over five years, JIBC has used our unique student trajectory to design and implement open solutions for course delivery and life-long learning resources.



Open courses and resources are a valuable and practical solution to the numerous training issues and problems that arise when working with in the public safety sector. For example, rather than exclusively looking at learners who are currently in our programs, we look at designing for the long-term. An open resource website that allows policing students to access the legal elements of common criminal offences will also greatly benefit them when they are on the police force. Open design allows us to consider and explore the application of the resource inside and outside of the classroom.



In this session, using the JIBC student trajectory, we'll look at six key design considerations for open within the context of public safety post-secondary education, including:



1. Frequently changing regulations, standards and legislation

2. Widely-distributed learners

3. Mobile accessibility of resources

4. Sensitive material

5. Reducing costs to students

6. Reducing development cost

Speakers
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of British Columbia
Senior Instructional Designer, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC)


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom

11:30am

Table 5 - OER-Enabled Pedagogy
Over the past decade, the term Š—“Open Educational ResourcesŠ— has become clearly defined, in part by the 5Rs. In recent years the two terms Š—“Open Educational PracticesŠ— and Š—“Open PedagogyŠ— have been used in various ways, including as synonyms. In this presentation we propose distinctive definitions for these terms and provide examples of each.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Research... Read More →
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent over 20 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my colleagues... Read More →


Thursday October 12, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Royal Ballroom
 
Friday, October 13
 

10:30am

The Digital Polarization Initiative: An Open Pedagogy Project for a Post-Truth World
The Digital Polarization Initiative, or DigiPo , is an attempt to build student web literacy by having students participating in a broad, cross-institutional project to fact-check, annotate, and provide context to the different news stories that show up in our Twitter and Facebook feeds. The effort is spearheaded by Mike Caulfield.

As a project that pushes students and faculty from a dozen different institutions into a single wiki community it forms a potential model for future cross-institutional open pedagogy work. As a project that focuses on the problems of our current "post-truth" moment, it shows ways in which open pedagogy -- the student and faculty production of openly licensed and published materials -- addresses concerns in ways that traditional pedagogy cannot.

Mike Caulfield will discuss the aims of the project, some of the sticking points of implementation, as well as how the pedagogy carries forward the best ideas of past open pedagogy projects to meet new challenges. Early assessments of the effort will be shared.

Spoiler alert: he will also attempt to recruit your class into the project. You have been warned.

Speakers
MC

Mike Caulfield

Director of Blended and Networked Learning, Washington State University


Friday October 13, 2017 10:30am - 10:55am
Valencia

11:00am

On-Ramps, Packages, & Widgets: From Textbooks to Open Pedagogy
The LCC Open Learn Lab is a domains-of-one's-own project in a community college aimed at supporting the 5 R's and open ed practices. DoOO at teaching-oriented schools such as CC's (as opposed to research/grad uni's) face particular challenges. Faculty are so teaching focused and so not-research focused, that pitches about creating own scholarly identity or authoring your own stuff aren't effective. In addition, CC faculty are so time-crunched (80% are struggling adjuncts & full-timers teach 32 cred hr loads/yr) that there's very little time for learning/exploring tech. To such faculty, domains and cPanels are fantasy talk. They need a short time-spent-learning-to-useful-impact cycle. They need innovations they can adopt in this class, this semester, RIGHT NOW.

Many faculty are receptive to OER-as-free textbooks. We extend that into remixing, sharing, and open ed practices through on-ramps or migration paths. Sophisticated techies can take the fast lane to their own WP multisites and domains. For the less tech savvy, we have a selection of tools/sites that create something useful for their classes on their own sites before having to fully understand WordPress or cPanel. They can grow and move along the on-ramp.

These quick-launch tools/sites are packages of themes/plugins/lyouts tailored to certain pedagogical uses. They play nice with the LMS. One of our most popular is simple course site for students to write-in-public . Faculty who start with this often then want to move to student blogs with RSS syndication to course hub designs.

We are building what we call packages or widgets : pre-formatted WP sites with set plugins/themes tailored to specific pedagogical needs. Think SPLOT with pedagogical suggestions. Our latest effort is a virtual lab notebook that pushes results to student sites.

The last part of this session will engage attendees in a discussion of strategies for better sharing such resources across schools, especially smaller, resource-str

Speakers
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Prof. Economics / Open Learning Lab, Lansing Community College
Open Learning, OER, OER publishing, Commons, CoOO, DoOO, Community Colleges, Higher Ed strategy, institutional structure/governance


Friday October 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:25am
Valencia

11:30am

Convos, comix, and creative pedagogues: make things for/in/through your contexts?
We will share our graphic open framework that creates instructional web comix using APIs, github, google sheets, graphics curation, and creative writing .

While detailing how this project began at #opened16 with the goal of sharing playful and meaningful exchanges centered on domain literacy, we aim at engaging others to adapt and use our framework in their own praxis and/or classrooms.

Our session will focus on practical implementations of how making web comix can open learning opportunities for audiences in and out of formal learning environments.

Speakers
avatar for Kin Lane

Kin Lane

API Evangelist, API Evangelist
I am the @APIEvangelist paying attention to the technology, business, and politics of APIs.


Friday October 13, 2017 11:30am - 11:55am
Valencia

1:00pm

You've Saved $175 Million - So What?
Adoptions and student savings are great outcomes of Open Educational Resources, but what OER really does for a community is provide freedom to do even more! Four leaders of OER programs will discuss how they took quality, already-existing OER content and utilized the freedom of open licensing to create and manage meaningful projects that go beyond the original textbook. Examples will include ancillaries, courseware, regionalization, and modification of OER.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design support... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, OpenStax, Rice University
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

Program Manager, Affordable Learning Georgia, University System of Georgia
avatar for Kathy Labadorf

Kathy Labadorf

Info Literacy, Open Ed Resources&Social Sci Lib, UConn Library
Leading a burgeoning OER Initiative at UConn. Excited about the Social Justice elements of Open and Creative Commons licenses. Talk to me about Open Pedagogy and how to grow that initiative at a Research 1 University!
avatar for Rahim Rajan

Rahim Rajan

Senior Program Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


Friday October 13, 2017 1:00pm - 1:55pm
Valencia